Chapter 9 (part 3)

Corporate Faithfulness and
Sanctification

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Proclaim liberty throughout all the land unto all the inhabitants thereof. (Leviticus 25:10a)

If ye continue in my word, [then] are ye my disciples indeed; And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you free. -- Jesus Christ (John 8:31b,32)

If the Son therefore shall make you free, ye shall be free indeed. -- Jesus Christ (John 8:36)

For other foundation can no man lay than that is laid, which is Jesus Christ. -- (1 Corinthians 3:11)

And the multitudes that went before, and that followed, cried, saying, Hosanna to the son of David: Blessed is he that cometh in the name of the Lord; Hosanna in the highest. (Matthew 21:9)
This was the Lord's public claiming of authority over Israel. He was the son of David, and so He was by natural right the King of the Jews. If He had taken possession of His own, He would have been sitting on the throne of the chosen dynasty of David by right of birth. Also as the Messiah, the Christ, He was the King of His people Israel. Concerning Him it had been said by the prophet, "Rejoice greatly, O Daughter of Zion; shout, O daughter of Jerusalem: behold! thy King cometh unto thee: he is just, and having salvation; lowly, and riding upon an ass, and upon a colt the foal of an ass" (Zechariah 9:9). Our Lord Jesus literally came to Zion in this way. As King He rode to His capital and entered His palace. In His priestly royalty the Son of God went to His Father's house, to the temple of sacrifice and sovereignty. Among the tribes of Israel He is seen to be "One chosen out of the people," whom the Lord had given to be a leader and commander for the people. They might afterwards choose Barabbas and cry that they had no king but Caesar, yet Jesus was their King, as Pilate reminded them when he said, "Shall I crucify your king?" And also His cross declared, it, bearing the legal inscription, "This is Jesus the King of the Jews." Before His trial and condemnation He had put in a public claim to the rights and prerogatives of Zion's king, whom God has set on His holy hill. Would to God all fully recognized our Lord's kingdom, yielding to His sway! Oh, that you would bow before Him, and put your trust in Him! Part of His intent in riding through Jerusalem was that we also who dwell in the isles of the sea might know Him and reverence Him as King of kings and Lord of lords." -- C.H. Spurgeon commenting on Matthew 21:9 in Devotional Classics of C.H. Spurgeon, p. 86

"Whereas, we all came into these parts of America with one and the same end and aim, to advance the Kingdom of our Lord Jesus Christ, and to enjoy the liberties of the Gospel in purity and peace." -- The New England Confederation, May 19, 1643

The roots of liberty and limited government are in the Protestant Reformation. We believe the key to the maintenance of liberty and limited government are to be found in the Scottish covenanting struggle.

The question of Paul, Is Christ divided? is one to which professing Christians have not given sufficient heed, and the evil consequences are abundantly apparent.
It was deemed essential to the salvation of men that their Redeemer should possess the powers at once of a prophet, a priest, and a king. These offices, while essentially distinct, are necessarily and inseparably connected with one another. Such a union has been by some utterly denied; and its denial has laid foundation for some capital errors, which have exerted a pernicious influence on the Christian church. By others it has been criminally overlooked; and the neglect with which it has been treated has occasioned vague and conflicting conceptions regarding the great work of man's deliverance from sin and wrath by the mediation of the Son of God.
If, as we presume will be readily admitted, the whole of Christ's offices are necessary to the salvation of fallen man, it follows that they are all essential to the character of the Saviour, and that, of course, we can not suppose him to have existed for a moment without any one of them, as this would suppose him to have been, for the time at least, no Saviour. -- William Symington

Briefly stated, where Christ is demoted or limited, His Kingdom and crown rights are limited and demoted. There is then a shift of sovereignty from God to man, which means the triumph of the state. The state as the new sovereign becomes god walking on earth, and the result is the rapid death of all freedom. -- R.J. Rushdoony

In the final analysis, all modern ills, spiritual and temporal, are traceable to our continuing departure from the principles of the Second Reformation. . . . In particular, I am convinced that the Lord will not bless a church at peace with his enemies. Our departure from truth has led to our undernourished condition as a church; truth, as Thornwell argued, is the only food that the soul can digest.
It does no good to blame society or the church for our deficiencies before the Lord because Christ holds men, not churches and states, accountable. In the words of Hugh Miller, "Churches, however false and detestable, are never to be summoned to the bar of judgment. . . . To Christ, as his head and king, must every man render an account."
The great heresy of our times is that all men are children of God. Those within the church have lost their identity as a people of God, united in spirit and purpose. We have adopted the half-truths of our fathers for which Judah faced punishment: "Because they have despised the law of the Lord, and have not kept his commandments, and their lies caused them to err, after which their fathers have walked" (Amos 2:4b). Nevertheless, Christ loves his church, and he will see to it that his bride is prepared (Ephesians 5:27) for the great banquet. Based on the history of God's people, the needed corrections will result from either prayer or persecution, leading the people to renew their covenant promises. Let us pray that God's kingdom come, and let us covenant to fulfill our obligations to be his people. When persecution comes, let us pray that we would stand as firm as did the Scottish Covenanters. When covenanting comes, let us praise the Lord, for only in him will we stand firm. Let us ever strive to make it possible for our children to utter one of James Nisbet's praises, "O my soul! Bless and praise the Lord that I was born in a land where the glad tidings of the everlasting gospel are published and pressed with so much purity and plainness." This should be our prayer, "Turn us again, O God, and cause thy face to shine; and we shall be saved" (Psalm 80:3). -- Edwin Nesbit Moore, from the conclusion to Our Covenant Heritage

Ye have seen what I did unto the Egyptians, and how I bare you on eagles' wings, and brought you unto myself. Now therefore, if ye will obey my voice indeed, and keep my covenant, then ye shall be a peculiar treasure unto me above all people: for all the earth is mine: And ye shall be unto me a kingdom of priests, and an holy nation. -- The Word of The Lord (Exodus 19:4-6a)
What a loving preface to the law! If anything could have engaged rebellious man to obedience, this would have done it, but, alas, the Lord has nourished and brought up children, and theyhave rebelled against him. -- C.H. Spurgeon commenting on Exodus 19:4-6a in Spurgeon's Devotional Bible, p. 92.


How does a nation protect itself against terrorists who commit suicide to murder innocent citizens?
It is the presence of The Holy Spirit in society, The Third Person of the Holy Trinity -- it is His presence alone, that restrains evil in society. It is His presence alone that stops men from murdering their neighbors and from completely destroying society. See John Owen, "God's Presence With a People the Spring of Their Prosperity; With Their Special Interest in Abiding in Him"
In the absence of The Holy Spirit there is no restraint of evil.
Therefore, a nation that struggles to remove The Holy Trinity, The Father, The Son, and The Holy Spirit, from all public life, that nation will lose all restrain of evil, and will succumb to self-destruction from within. It will also succumb to destruction from ememies without. It is the presence in a nation of The Holy One of Israel, The God of Abraham, Issac, and Jacob, the presence of The Triune God, that restrains evil, and that gives society order and life.
Honored citizens of The United States of America, your willful rebellion against Our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ has brought the judgment of God upon this nation. God punishes a people by putting godless leaders in command. All restraint of evil has disappeared from our nation, and our leaders are helpless to stop the spread of terrorism. Repent honored citizens of this beloved nation, partake of Christ, for you are the terrorists.
And now may the Grace, the Mercy, and the Peace, of God The Father, The Son, and The Holy Spirit, rest and abide with you now and forevermore. Amen.

The Treasury of David, Psalm 106
http://www.spurgeon.org/treasury/ps106.htm

Q. What kind of submission may be rendered to immoral and tyrannical governments, the ordinance of Satan, such as now exist?

A. Christians, in the exercise of their Christian liberty, and in the performance of the duty of "proving all things, and holding fast what is good," can submit to such governments "for wrath's sake," ONLY, which kind of submission has no respect to the power as legitimate authority, but simply, from dread of the cruelty of the tyrant, who pours forth his fury upon all who oppose his misrule. To God's moral ordinance as described, is allegiance due for conscience sake. Submission to this, is submission to God.

Q. When Christians reside under an immoral government, is not conformity to the general order of society a duty, provided this can be done without violating the divine law ?

A. If the constituted authorities of a nation are not in voluntary subserviency to the Mediator, but opposed to his authority, law, and religion, for the sake of peace and order, and for the sake of contributing as much as possible to the ease and happiness of society, and from a spirit of resignation to the Divine providence, and in order to make legitimate provision for themselves and relatives, so much conformity to the prevailing system as is consistent with their oath of allegiance to Messiah, is a duty conscientiously to be practiced, although very distinct from that obedience for conscience sake which they would render to the government of their choice, to the authority which has the sanction of the Divine approbation. Jer. xxix. 4-7, "Seek the peace of the city whither I have caused you to be carried away captives, and pray unto the Lord for it: for in the peace thereof shall ye have peace.:

Q. Whilst it is the duty of Christians thus to live a quiet and peaceable life in all godliness and honesty, in conformity to the laws of Christ, which are everywhere, and at all times, obligatory upon them -- is it not their duty publicly to declare their dissent from an immoral constitution of civil government, within the reach of whose power they may reside ?

A. This is, indeed, their duty. Because, 1. They are bound to defend God's moral ordinance of civil government, in the purity of which, God's own honor as "the Governor of the nations," is deeply involved. Rev. ii. 25, 26, "That which you have already hold fast till I come; and he that overcometh -- and keepeth my works unto the end -- to him will I give power in the nations," &c. Isa. viii. 16, "Bind up the testimony, seal the law among my disciples." 2. The purity of this holy ordinance cannot be preserved, if it is confounded with the existing immoral systems, and by an indiscriminate exercise of allegiance. 3. Christians are witnesses for God among men; and having in their possession "the testimony of God," in the Holy Scriptures, respecting the true character of civil government, and the duty of national subjection to Christ and his law, and respect for his holy religion, it is their duty to apply the doctrines of inspiration upon this subject, in stating and defending the truth, and condemning the existing immoral systems, and in bearing public testimony against all who uphold them. Isa. xliii. 10, "Ye are my witnesses, saith the Lord." Rev. xi. 3, "I will give power to my two witnesses, and they shall prophesy a thousand two hundred and three score days, clothed in sackcloth;" xii. 17, "And the dragon was wroth with the woman, and went to make war with the remnant of her seed, which keep the commandments of God, and have the testimony of Jesus Christ." See also Rev. xvii. 14, Acts v. 32, xxvi. 16, Micah iv. 8-18, Mark vi. 11. 4. The witnesses in Revelation are raised up not only to testify against the ecclesiastical apostasy, "The scarlet woman," or Roman church -- and "the image of the beast," -- the Papacy -- but also against "the seven-headed and ten-horned" beast -- or the civil powers -- upon which the woman rides. The nations which sustain Antichrist, and are equally, with "the man of sin," Antichristian, and are at war with the Lamb. See passages last quoted, together with Rev. xiii. 1, 2, xvii. 3-14, and xii. 11, "And they overcame him, (the devil embodied in the Roman church papacy, and civil powers,) by the blood of the Lamb and by the word of their testimony;" xvii. 14, "These, (the civil powers,) shall make war with the Lamb-and the Lamb shall overcome them: for he is Lord of lords, and King of kings: and they that are with him are called, and chosen, and faithful."

Q. Are not virtuous persons, who, in their private capacity, are endeavoring to further the true end of civil government -- the maintenance of peace and quietness in all godliness and honesty, although they dissent from the constitution of civil government of the nation in which they reside, entitled to protection ?

A. They certainly are entitled to protection in their lives, liberties, and property; "but they are not to act inconsistently with their declared dissent, and it would be tyranny to constrain them to such measures." Exod. xxii. 21, "Thou shalt neither vex a stranger nor oppress him." See also Rom. xiii. 3, 1 Tim. ii. 2, Jer. xxi. 12, Esther iii. 8, 9.

Q. Should not "Christians, testifying against national evils, and striving, in the use of moral means, to effect a reformation, relinquish temporal privileges, rather than do any thing which may appear to contradict their testimony, or lay a stumbling-block before their weaker brethren?"

A. This is unquestionably their duty. Because they cannot convince men of their own sincerity, and of the immorality of a principle or practice, whilst they themselves are found actually maintaining the immoral principle or practice, (by oath of allegiance, voting, and holding offices, &c.) and enjoying the emoluments of iniquity decreed by law. Heb. xi. 24, 26, 36, "By faith, Moses, when he was come to years, refused to be called the son of Pharaoh's daughter. Esteeming the reproach of Christ to be greater riches than the treasures in Egypt. And others had trials of cruel mockings and scourgings, yea, moreover, of bonds and imprisonments." Numb. xxiii. 9, "Lo, the people shall dwell alone, and shall not be reckoned among the nations." Rom. xiv. 21, "It is good neither to eat flesh, nor drink wine, nor anything whereby thy brother stumbleth, or is offended."

Q. Will not such a public dissent from immoral governments, and faithful testimony against them, ultimately prevail to their overthrow?

A. Yes. By these means the witnesses will prevail, however much they may suffer in the meantime, and will be the honored instruments of establishing the millennial kingdom of the Lamb. Rev. xii. 11 , "And they overcame him, by the blood of the Lamb and by the word of their testimony; and they loved not their lives unto the death." Dan. vii. 22, "The Ancient of days came, and judgment was given to the saints of the Most High; and the time came that the saints possessed the kingdom." Rev. xx. 4, "And I saw thrones, and they sat upon them, and judgment was given unto them; and I saw the souls of them that were beheaded for the witness of Jesus, and for the word of God, and which had not worshipped the beast, (the civil powers,) neither his image, (the Papacy,) neither had received his mark, (yielded allegiance,) upon their foreheads, or in their hands; and they lived and reigned with Christ a thousand years." -- William L. Roberts, The Reformed Presbyterian Catechism, p. 130-133

Traditionally, law was never construed as legalist. It was always construed as a result of covenant. If we can define the word covenant as bond, that lovely four letter word, b-o-n-d, then it's a relationship, it's a solidarity with God or with another person. And from that relationship flows duty. So we can think of convent as that marvelous combination of promise and duty. And so I really see law as a response to a relationship. -- Joseph Kickasola

True, the state as the policeman can be corrupt; in fact, if the society as a whole is corrupt, the state will also be corrupt. In a healthy and godly society, the state will function successfully to restrain the minority of evil-doers. The key to the situation is not the state but the religious health of the society. -- Rousas John Rushdoony, in Institutes of Biblical Law, p. 470

If I profess with the loudest voice and clearest exposition every portion of the Word of God except precisely that little point which the world and the devil are at that moment attacking, I am not confessing Christ, however boldly I may be professing Him. Where the battle rages, there the loyalty of the soldier is proven; and to be steady on all the battlefront besides is mere flight and disgrace if he flinches at that point. -- Martin Luther

It is a poor and pitiful kind of knowledge, to know many loose parcels, and broken members of truth, without knowing the whole, or the place and the relations which they have to the rest. To know letters and not syllables, or syllables and not words, or words and not sentences, or sentences and not the scope of the discourse, are all but an unprofitable knowledge. -- Richard Baxter (I:269)


Contents

Note: Author's names appearing in all caps indicates the title is available from Still Waters Revival Books.

The Westminster Confession of Faith (1647, Westminster Standards) and Related Works

Contents: Chapter 9, "Corporate Faithfulness and Sanctification" (parts 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5), interactive
http://www.lettermen2.com/bcrr9cha.html#index9

Combined Interactive Contents for The Web Edition of Biblical Counsel: Resources for Renewal
http://www.lettermen2.com/combtoc.html




Chapter 9 (part 2)

Corporate Faithfulness and
Sanctification




THE WESTMINSTER CONFESSION (1647, THE WESTMINSTER STANDARDS) AND RELATED WORKS

Many scholars consider alterations to the Westminster Confession of Faith (1647), originally compiled by the Westminster Assembly of Divines, to be a "reverse plagiarism," analogous to plagiarism. "Plagiarize: to steal and pass off (the ideas or words of another) as one's own use (a created production) without crediting the source; to commit literary theft: present as new and original an idea or product derived from an existing source." (Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary)
Revisers have altered the content of the original WCF (1647), have removed key doctrine related to Christ's Crown and Covenant, and yet have retained the name given by the Westminster Assembly. Consequently, revisers have deceived many in the Church into believing that their alterations are the work of the Westminster Assembly of Divines in 1647.
Most Presbyterian and Reformed denominations and seminaries today prescribe to the Westminster Confession of Faith (1879), the "American Version." Ideas have consequences. Because theology is truth, when men delete or alter key doctrines, or replace sound doctrine, deducted from God's infallible Word by logic, with human imaginations, then the course of history is changed.
For a detailed analysis of the devastating consequences to American history caused by non-Biblical alterations in the Westminster Confession of Faith and non-Biblical alterations to constitutional government in the United States see the following:
"A Theological Interpretation of American History"
http://www.lettermen2.com/bcrr9chc.html#stiahis
In Great Britain the Independents and Calvinistic Baptists edited the Westminster Confession (1647) for their own use, but they gave the new confessions a different name, the Savoy Declaration and the Baptist Confession. Certainly this was the honest procedure.
"In 1788 the U.S. Constitution and the revised Westminster Confession were ratified. For a detailed discussion see:
"Authority: Biblical, Confessional, Ecclesiastical" in Crossed Fingers: How the Liberals Captured the Presbyterian Church, by Gary North
http://entrewave.com/freebooks/docs/html/gncf/Chapter03.htm
See also the following:
American Revisions to the Westminster Confession of Faith (1789)
http://www.opc.org/documents/WCF_orig.html
Appendix A: Major Changes of the Savoy Declaration
http://www.bible-researcher.com/wescoappa.html
Appendix B: Major Changes of the PCUSA (1788-1958)
http://www.bible-researcher.com/wescoappb.html
Appendix C: Major Changes of the UPCUSA and PCUS (1958-1983)
http://www.bible-researcher.com/wescoappc.html

In the same establishment may be found believers in nearly every dogma of the Popish creed, who nevertheless have declared their faith in articles which are distinctly Calvinistic; and now last, and, to our minds, most sorrowful of all, it comes out that there are men to be found among Caledonia's once sternly truthful sons who can occupy the pulpits and the manses of an orthodox Presbyterian church, and yet oppose her ancient confession of faith. Our complaint is in each case, not that the men changed their views, and threw up their former creeds, but that having done so they did not at once quit the office of minister to the community whose faith they could no longer uphold; their fault is not that they differed, but that, differing, they sought an office of which the prime necessity is agreement. All the elements of the lowest kind of knavery meet in the evil which we now denounce. Treachery is never more treacherous than when it leads a man to stab at a doctrine which he has solemnly engaged to uphold, and for the maintenance of which he receives a livelihood. The office of minister would never wittingly be entrusted by any community to a person who would use it for the overthrow of the principles upon which the community was founded. Such conduct would be suicidal. A sincere belief of the church's creed was avowedly or by implication a part of the qualification which helped the preacher to his stipend, and when that qualification ceases the most vital point of the compact between him and his church is infringed, and he is bound in honor to relinquish an office which he can no longer honestly fulfill." -- Charles Spurgeon in "Ministers Sailing Under False Colours," Sword and Trowel, February, 1870, quoted by John W. Robbins, February 10, 2006

Carruthers, S.W. Westminster Confession of Faith: An account of the preparation and printing of the WCF's seven leading editions, to which is appended a critical text of the Confession, with notes thereon (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books).

Carson, John L. (editor), David W. Hall (editor) To Glorify and Enjoy God: A Commemoration of the 350th Anniversary of the Westminister Assembly (Banner of Truth).

*Hetherington, William, Hetherington (The History of the Westminster Assembly of Divines (Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books).
" 'Every person who has directed his attention to the events of the seventeenth century, whether with regard to their civil or their religious aspect, has felt that it was impossible fully to understand either the one or the other line of study, without taking into view the character of the Westminster Assembly, the purpose for which it met, and the result of its deliberations . . . The man who penetrates a little deeper into the nature of those unrevealed but powerful influences which move a nation's mind, and mould its destinies, will be ready to direct his attention more profoundly to the objects and deliberations of an assembly which met at a moment so critical, and was composed of the great master-minds of the age; and the theologian who has learned to view religion as the vital principle of human nature, equally in nations and in the individual man, will not easily admit that weak idea, that such an assembly could have been an isolated event, but will be disposed earnestly to inquire what led to its meeting, and what important consequences followed. And although the subject has not hitherto been investigated with such a view, it may, we trust, be possible to prove, that it was the most important event in the century in which it occurred; and that it has exerted, and in all probability will yet exert, a far more wide and permanent influence upon both the civil and the religious history of mankind than has generally been ever imagined,' writes William Hetherington in this book (SWRB, 1856, 2nd reprint edition, 1993, pp. 16-17, emphasis added). This book is probably the best popular historical account ever published regarding this unsurpassed Assembly. The history leading up to the Assembly is especially important and not only set the context for what became the major debates among the ministers present, but even dictated who was selected to this august body of scholars. These debates and their resolutions have defined and directed Christian thought and culture ever since their original ratification. Hetherington covers the period from 1531 to 1662. Many consider this era a historical high water mark for doctrinal and practical precision. Also included is a chapter on the theological productions of the Westminster Assembly and six valuable appendices (one containing six biographical notices of the Scottish Commissioners -- including Rutherford, Gillespie, Henderson and Baillie)." -- SWRB
History of the Westminster Assembly of Divines, by William Maxwell Hetherington, D. D., LL. D.
http://www.reformed.org/books/hetherington/west_assembly/index.html

Lee, Francis Nigel, Westminster Confession and Modern Society (Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books).
"How may we confess Christ, to a changing and hostile society, in the twentieth century? Dr. Lee leads us to the teaching of the WCF, showing how it addresses every area of life with its comprehensive and Biblically faithful testimony to the Truth!" -- SWRB

*Mitchell, Alexander F., *The Westminster Assembly: Its History and Standards (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books, 1997).
"William Hetherington has written: 'Every person who has directed his attention to the events of the seventeenth century, whether with regard to their civil or their religious aspect, has felt that it was impossible fully to understand either the one or the other line of study, without taking into view the character of the Westminster Assembly, the purpose for which it met, and the result of its deliberations... (T)he man who penetrates a little deeper into the nature of those unrevealed but powerful influences which move a nation's mind, and mould its destinies, will be ready to direct his attention more profoundly to the objects and deliberations of an assembly which met at a moment so critical, and was composed of the great master-minds of the age; and the theologian who has learned to view religion as the vital principle of human nature, equally in nations and in the individual man, will not easily admit that weak idea, that such an assembly could have been an isolated event, but will be disposed earnestly to inquire what led to its meeting, and what important consequences followed. And although the subject has not hitherto been investigated with such a view, it may, we trust, be possible to prove, that it was the most important event in the century in which it occurred; and that it has exerted, and in all probability will yet exert, a far more wide and permanent influence upon both the civil and the religious history of mankind than has generally been ever imagined.' (Hetherington , History of the Westminster Assembly, pp. 16-17). Beattie (Memorial Volume, p. xxxv, 1879) called this book, 'perhaps the best single popular book on the Assembly yet published.' Read this rare item and find out why. Limited stock remaining. When our hardcover stock is depleted we will substitute a 'bound photocopy' edition in its place, at the same low price, unless you instruct us otherwise.
"In the first three lectures, the author has given a succinct account of English Puritanism from its origin to the meeting of the Westminster Assembly, and in the tenth lecture, he has given a similar account of the history of doctrine in the British Churches during the same period. The seven intervening lectures were prepared in accord with the author's desire to complete his researches on the Westminster Assembly. Throughout this work, Mitchell has endeavored to give prominence to aspects of this magnificent period in Puritan history which have hitherto been generally overlooked and to treat more briefly of those which have been previously dwelt on -- making this the ideal companion volume to Hetherington's (THE HISTORY OF THE WESTMINSTER ASSEMBLY OF DIVINES and Gillespie's notes taken at this assembly (found in his Works). Moreover, Mitchell writes in an irenic manner, making this a perfect introductory volume to Puritanism and the work of the Assembly. Mitchell notes the importance of the Westminster Assembly in the following manner, 'Richard Baxter, who was perhaps as competent as any of their contemporaries to give an impartial verdict, does not hesitate to affirm that 'the divines there congregated were men of eminent learning and godliness, ministerial ability and fidelity; and being not worthy,' he modestly adds, 'to be one of them myself, I may the more freely speak that truth which I know, even in the face of malice and envy, that so far as I am able to judge bythe information of all history . . . the Christian world since the days of the apostles had never a Synod of more excellent divines.' (p. 118). Thus, it has been noted by many, that next to the Scripture itself, there is probably more to be gained from the study of this segment of history (and the works of the men God called to produce the Puritan intellect and the Westminster family of documents) than any other single period of history -- right up to the present era. Mitchell's account of this age of brilliance is a veritable information cornucopia in which all lovers of Puritanism, the Westminster Assembly, and especially the truth of Christ (which these our forefathers in the faith so boldly proclaimed) can readily take delight! 'The Westminster Assembly, if it does not form a landmark in the history of our common Protestantism, must at least be admitted to constitute an epoch, and a notable one, in the history of Puritanism,' notes Mitchell. Don't miss this fine historical account. Hardcover copies of this item will be send until our present stock is depleted." -- SWRB

Price, Greg, History of the Assembly at Westminster (Audio Cassette Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books).
"This lecture is probably the best introductory historical account of this unsurpassed Assembly in audio format. It fulfills the same purpose for which Hetherington noted he wrote his classic (THE HISTORY OF THE WESTMINSTER ASSEMBLY OF DIVINES (only it is in audio format and much shorter): In common with all true Presbyterians, I have often regretted the want of a History of the Westminster Assembly of Divines... Especially in such a time as the present, when all distinctive Presbyterian principles are not only called in question, but also misrepresented and condemned, such a want has become absolutely unendurable, unless Presbyterians are willing to permit their Church to perish under a load of unanswered, yet easily refuted, calumny. And as the best refutation of calumny is the plain and direct statement of truth, it is by that process that I have endeavored to vindicate the principles and the character of the Presbyterian Church (p. i.). The Puritan history leading up to the Assembly (which this lecture takes a in-depth look at) is especially important and not only set the context for what became the major debates among the ministers present, but even dictated who was selected to this august body of scholars. Civil wars, national upheavals, emigration to the `new world' and a host of other epoch making events surrounded this momentous period of history. These debates and their resolutions have defined and directed Christian thought and national cultures ever since their original ratification -- and Hetherington (in The History of the Westminster Assembly of Divines) is not shy about noting the significance of this Assembly when he writes,

But the man who penetrates a little deeper into the nature of those unrevealed but powerful influences which move a nation's mind, and mould its destinies, will be ready to direct his attention more profoundly to the objects and deliberations of an assembly which met at a moment so critical, and was composed of the great master-minds of the age; and the theologian who has learned to view religion as the vital principle of human nature, equally in nations and in the individual man, will not easily admit the weak idea, that such an assembly could have been an isolated event, but will be disposed earnestly to inquire what led to its meeting, and what important consequences followed. And although the subject has not hitherto been investigated with such a view, it may, we trust, be possible to prove, that it (the Westminster Assembly–RB) was the most important event in the century in which it occurred; and that it has exerted, and in all probability will yet exert, a far more wide and permanent influence upon both the civil and the religious history of mankind than has generally been even imagined (p. 17).
Many consider this era a historical high water mark for doctrinal and practical Puritan precision and this work is indispensable for understanding the work accomplished by the Westminster Assembly, Presbyterian and Independent history, Cromwell and much more. For example, consider the lofty and Christ honoring goal of the Assembly as summarized by Hetherington (in The History of the Westminster Assembly of Divines): There was one great, and even sublime idea, brought somewhat indefinitely before the Westminster Assembly, which has not yet been realized, the idea of a Protestant union throughout Christendom, not merely for the purpose of counterbalancing Popery, but in order to purify, strengthen, and unite all true Christian churches, so that with combined energy and zeal they might go forth, in glad compliance with the Redeemer's commands, teaching all nations, and preaching the everlasting gospel to every creature under heaven. This truly magnificent, and also truly Christian idea, seems to have originated in the mind of that distinguished man, Alexander Henderson. It was suggested by him to the Scottish commissioners, and by them partially brought before the English Parliament, requesting them to direct the Assembly to write letters to the Protestant Churches in France, Holland, Switzerland, and other Reformed Churches. . . . and along with these letters were sent copies of the Solemn League and Covenant, a document which might itself form the basis of such a Protestant union. The deep thinking divines of the Netherlands apprehended the idea, and in their answer, not only expressed their approbation of the Covenant, but also desired to join in it with the British kingdoms. Nor did they content themselves with the mere expression of approval and willingness to join. A letter was soon afterwards sent to the Assembly from the Hague, written by Duraeus (the celebrated John Dury), offering to come to the Assembly, and containing a copy of a vow which he had prepared and tendered to the distinguished Oxenstiern, chancellor of Sweden, wherein he bound himself 'to prosecute a reconciliation between Protestants in point of religion'. . . . [O]n one occasion Henderson procured a passport to go to Holland, most probably for the purpose of prosecuting this grand idea. But the intrigues of politicians, the delays caused by the conduct of the Independents, and the narrow-minded Erastianism of the English Parliament, all conspired to prevent the Assembly from entering farther into that truly glorious Christian enterprise. Days of trouble and darkness came; persecution wore out the great men of that remarkable period; pure and vital Christianity was stricken to the earth and trampled under foot. (pp. 337-339). Further demonstrating his grasp of the most important events of the second Reformation, Hetherington comments on the Solemn League (the epitome of second Reformation attainments), `no man who is able to understand its nature, and to feel and appreciate its spirit and its aim, will deny it to be the wisest, the sublimest, and the most sacred document ever framed by uninspired men' (p. 134). Price gives special attention in this study to the central place of the Solemn League and Covenant in the thinking and international vision for Biblical Reformation of the Westminster Divines. Anyone interested in the work of the Westminster Assembly -- and the men, teaching and events which were at the heart of the Puritan revolution against the forces of antichrist -- should read listen to this audio track at least once." -- SWRB
History of the Assembly at Westminster by Greg Price
http://sphynx.idontknow.com/swrb/historyoftheassembly.ram

*Symington, William, The Westminster Assembly of Divines
http://members.aol.com/RSICHURCH/west1.html

*Warfield, B.B., *The Westminster Assembly and Its Work (Edmonton, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books). 20286
"Much excellent and amazing information is contained in this volume defending the greatest of Reformed standards concerning many of its most important points. Extremely pertinent for today are the chapters dealing with inspiration, God's decree (absolute sovereignty), and the Holy Spirit." -- CBD

*Westminster Assembly (1643-1652), The Westminster Confession of Faith (Glasgow, Scotland [Free Presbyterian Publications, 133 Woodlands Road, Glasgow G3 6LE]: Free Presbyterian Publication, 1994). ISBN 0902506080 (casebound) and ISBN 0902506358 (paperback), Still Waters Revival Books, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Also available from Crown and Covenant Publications:
http://www.crownandcovenant.com/product_p/ds115.htm
" 'The product of Puritan conflict,' stated Shedd, reaching 'a perfection of statement never elsewhere achieved.' All that learning the most profound and extensive, intellect the most acute and searching, and piety the most sincere and earnest, could accomplish, was thus concentrated in the Westminster Assembly's Confession of Faith, which may be safely termed the most perfect statement of Systematic Theology ever framed by the Christian Church,' writes Hetherington (The History of the Westminster Assembly of Divines), p. 345. Concerning the Shorter Catechism, which is one of the items also included in this book, Mitchell notes: 'it is a thoroughly Calvinistic and Puritan catechism, the ripest fruit of the Assembly's thought and experience, maturing and finally fixing the definitions of theological terms to which Puritanism for half a century had been leading up and gradually coming closer and closer to in its legion of catechisms' (Westminster Assembly: Its History and Standards, p. 431). The Westminster Confession of Faith is the greatest of all the creeds of the Christian church. The church of Christ cannot be creedless and live. Especially in an age of doubt and confusion, it is her duty to define and proclaim the one true faith. Nowhere has the Reformed church done this so effectively as in the Westminster Confession and family of documents. This book represents Reformed thinking at its purest and best. It was intended, as part of the Covenanted Reformation taking place during its compilation, to be adopted as the binding confessional standard for every individual, family, court, church, and legislature in the British Isles." -- SWRB
This is considered to be the definitive publication of the Westminster family of documents. It includes the following:

  1. To the Christian Reader, Especially Heads of Families, Mr. Thomas Manton's Epistle to the Reader,
  2. The Confession of Faith (1646), the full and original edition with Scripture proofs written out,
  3. The Larger Catechism with Scripture proofs written out,
  4. The Shorter Catechism with Scripture proofs written out,
  5. The Sum of Saving Knowledge,
  6. The National Covenant,
  7. The Solemn League and Covenant,
  8. A Solemn Acknowledgement of Publick Sins and Breaches of the Covenant; and a Solemn Engagement to all the Duties Contained Therein
    CD #1, Reformation Bookshelf 30 CD Set
    http://www.swrb.com/Puritan/reformation-bookshelf-CDs.htm
  9. The Directory for the Public Worship of God,
  10. The Form of Presbyterial Church Government, and
  11. The Directory for Family Worship.
The Westminster Confession of Faith is said to be the finest summary of The Holy Bible available. It is recommended for daily devotions. Among the ten greatest works in the English language.
"The Westminster Confession of Faith (The Westminster Standards) and Related Works: A Study Guide"
http://www.lettermen2.com/suggest.html
For commentaries see the following topical listing:
"The Westminster Confession of Faith (The Westminster Standards) and Related Works"
http://www.lettermen2.com/bcrr9cha.html#wcf
Westminster Larger Catechism With Proof Texts
http://www.reformed.org/documents/wlc_w_proofs/WLC_frames.html
Westminster Confession of Faith With Scripture Proofs
http://www.reformed.org/documents/wcf_with_proofs/
Scripture Index to the Westminster Standards (The complete Scripture index to the Westminster Confession, Larger and Shorter Catechisms.)
http://www.swrb.com/newslett/actualnls/index01.htm
Bordwine, James, A Guide to the Westminster Standards: Confession of Faith and Larger Catechism (Unicoi, TN: (The Trinity Foundation, 1996).
Includes a unique, 100-page topical index to both the Confession and the Catechism.
The Westminster Confession of Faith (1646) with all its subordinate documents in searchable format are found on CD #1 of the Reformation Bookshelf 30 CD Set
http://www.swrb.com/Puritan/reformation-bookshelf-CDs.htm.
Westminster Assembly and Related Documents
http://www.covenanter.org/Westminster/westminsterhome.htm
The Significance of The Westminster Standards as a Creed
http://www.fpcr.org/blue_banner_articles/signific.htm
Heresies Defined and the Necessity of Heresies Explained, by George Gillespie, Scottish Commissioner to the Assembly of Divines at Westminster
http://www.truecovenanter.com/gillespie/ggilles09.html
The Shorter Catechism With Scripture Proofs (Carlisle, PA [P.O. Box 621, Carlisle 17013, USA]: The Banner of Truth Trust).
Arguably the greatest tract ever created, all factors considered.
http://www.reformed.org/documents/WSC_frames.html
Westminster Shorter Catechism Project
"Click on any of the individual questions below to get the answer and Biblical references, as well as links to works by John Flavel, Thomas Watson, Thomas Boston, James Fisher, and John Whitecross, and others."
http://www.shortercatechism.com/

See also: The Scottish ReformationSelection of covenant heads for positions of leadership, Sexual relationship

Related WebLinks

Westminster Assembly and Related Documents
http://www.covenanter.org/Westminster/westminsterhome.htm

The Significance of The Westminster Standards as a Creed
http://www.fpcr.org/blue_banner_articles/signific.htm

Westminster Assembly, Exhortation by the Westminster Assembly
http://www.truecovenanter.com/covenants/candcexhortwestassembly.html

The Westminster Assembly Project
The Westminster Assembly Project exists to publish The Minutes and Papers of the Westminster Assembly.
http://www.westminsterassembly.org/

Regulations at Yale College (1745)
Showing the centrality of Calvinism and the Westminster Confession in Colonial higher education.
http://www.constitution.org/primarysources/yale.html

Presbyterian History

The Reformation in England 1 of 2 (The Providential Historical Preparation for the Westminster Assembly), Hebrews 11:2; Ephesians 4:11
Dr. C. Gregg Singer, Presbyterian History, 44 min.
http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?SID=12607144153

The Reformation in England 2 of 2 (And America)
Dr. C. Gregg Singer, Presbyterian History, 76 min., Matthew 5:13-16; Luke 19:13
http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?SID=126071623510

John Knox, the Scottish Covenanters, and the Westminster Assembly 1/3 (History Notes on Presbyterianism, Reformation, and Theology)
Dr. C. Gregg Singer, Presbyterian History, 52 min., Acts 1:11; Romans 13, Still Waters Revival Books
http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?SID=124071413102

John Knox, the Scottish Covenanters, and the Westminster Assembly 2/3 (History Notes on Presbyterianism, Reformation, and Theology)
Dr. C. Gregg Singer, Presbyterian History, 46 min., Hebrews 11:39; 1 Peter 2:13-14
http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?SID=12607114250

John Knox, the Scottish Covenanters, and the Westminster Assembly 3/3 (History Notes on Presbyterianism, Reformation, and Theology)
Dr. C. Gregg Singer, Presbyterian History, 53 min., Daniel 4:35; Acts 13:17
http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?SID=12607114250

The Westminster Assembly
Dr. C. Gregg Singer, 50 min.
http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?SID=12160371617


Bible Research
http://www.bible-researcher.com/index.html

Historical Setting of the Confession
http://www.bible-researcher.com/wescon01.html

Bible Sermon's Online
Free Reformed sermons available online in audio and text format, with catalogue of sermons available on audio cassette. Most sermons are preached by Rev. Maurice Roberts, Inverness, who you may know as editor of the Banner of Truth Magazine.
http://www.bible-sermons.org.uk/



The Confession of Faith (1646)

*Westminster Assembly (1643-1652), The Westminster Confession of Faith (Glasgow, Scotland [Free Presbyterian Publications, 133 Woodlands Road, Glasgow G3 6LE]: Free Presbyterian Publication, 1994). ISBN 0902506080 (casebound) and ISBN 0902506358 (paperback), Still Waters Revival Books, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Also available from Crown and Covenant Publications:
http://www.crownandcovenant.com/product_p/ds115.htm
" 'The product of Puritan conflict,' stated Shedd, reaching 'a perfection of statement never elsewhere achieved.' All that learning the most profound and extensive, intellect the most acute and searching, and piety the most sincere and earnest, could accomplish, was thus concentrated in the Westminster Assembly's Confession of Faith, which may be safely termed the most perfect statement of Systematic Theology ever framed by the Christian Church,' writes Hetherington (The History of the Westminster Assembly of Divines), p. 345. Concerning the Shorter Catechism, which is one of the items also included in this book, Mitchell notes: 'it is a thoroughly Calvinistic and Puritan catechism, the ripest fruit of the Assembly's thought and experience, maturing and finally fixing the definitions of theological terms to which Puritanism for half a century had been leading up and gradually coming closer and closer to in its legion of catechisms' (Westminster Assembly: Its History and Standards, p. 431). The Westminster Confession of Faith is the greatest of all the creeds of the Christian church. The church of Christ cannot be creedless and live. Especially in an age of doubt and confusion, it is her duty to define and proclaim the one true faith. Nowhere has the Reformed church done this so effectively as in the Westminster Confession and family of documents. This book represents Reformed thinking at its purest and best. It was intended, as part of the Covenanted Reformation taking place during its compilation, to be adopted as the binding confessional standard for every individual, family, court, church, and legislature in the British Isles." -- SWRB
This is considered to be the definitive publication of the Westminster family of documents. It includes the following:
  1. To the Christian Reader, Especially Heads of Families, Mr. Thomas Manton's Epistle to the Reader,
  2. The Confession of Faith (1646), the full and original edition with Scripture proofs written out,
  3. The Larger Catechism with Scripture proofs written out,
  4. The Shorter Catechism with Scripture proofs written out,
  5. The Sum of Saving Knowledge,
  6. The National Covenant,
  7. The Solemn League and Covenant,
  8. A Solemn Acknowledgement of Publick Sins and Breaches of the Covenant; and a Solemn Engagement to all the Duties Contained Therein
    CD #1, Reformation Bookshelf 30 CD Set
    http://www.swrb.com/Puritan/reformation-bookshelf-CDs.htm
  9. The Directory for the Public Worship of God,
  10. The Form of Presbyterial Church Government, and
  11. The Directory for Family Worship.
The Westminster Confession of Faith is said to be the finest summary of The Holy Bible available. It is recommended for daily devotions. Among the ten greatest works in the English language.
"The Westminster Confession of Faith (The Westminster Standards) and Related Works: A Study Guide"
http://www.lettermen2.com/suggest.html
For commentaries see the following topical listing:
"The Westminster Confession of Faith (The Westminster Standards) and Related Works"
http://www.lettermen2.com/bcrr9cha.html#wcf
Westminster Larger Catechism With Proof Texts
http://www.reformed.org/documents/wlc_w_proofs/WLC_frames.html
Westminster Confession of Faith With Scripture Proofs
http://www.reformed.org/documents/wcf_with_proofs/
Scripture Index to the Westminster Standards (The complete Scripture index to the Westminster Confession, Larger and Shorter Catechisms.)
http://www.swrb.com/newslett/actualnls/index01.htm
Bordwine, James, A Guide to the Westminster Standards: Confession of Faith and Larger Catechism (Unicoi, TN: (The Trinity Foundation, 1996).
Includes a unique, 100-page topical index to both the Confession and the Catechism.
The Westminster Confession of Faith (1646) with all its subordinate documents in searchable format are found on CD #1 of the Reformation Bookshelf 30 CD Set
http://www.swrb.com/Puritan/reformation-bookshelf-CDs.htm.
Westminster Assembly and Related Documents
http://www.covenanter.org/Westminster/westminsterhome.htm
The Significance of The Westminster Standards as a Creed
http://www.fpcr.org/blue_banner_articles/signific.htm
Heresies Defined and the Necessity of Heresies Explained, by George Gillespie, Scottish Commissioner to the Assembly of Divines at Westminster
http://www.truecovenanter.com/gillespie/ggilles09.html
The Shorter Catechism With Scripture Proofs (Carlisle, PA [P.O. Box 621, Carlisle 17013, USA]: The Banner of Truth Trust).
Arguably the greatest tract ever created, all factors considered.
http://www.reformed.org/documents/WSC_frames.html
Westminster Shorter Catechism Project
"Click on any of the individual questions below to get the answer and Biblical references, as well as links to works by John Flavel, Thomas Watson, Thomas Boston, James Fisher, and John Whitecross, and others."
http://www.shortercatechism.com/

McKee, Charles B., An Analysis and Defense of the Doctrine of the Westminster Confession of Faith, 1832

Miller, Samuel, Doctrinal Integrity: The Utility and Importance of Creeds and Confessions and Adherence to Our Doctrinal Standards (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books, 1997).
"Miller deals with the necessity of written creeds and subscription to them. He shows that the principle doctrines of Scripture are proclaimed in the Westminster Standards and answers common objections against confessions. Creedalism is inescapable, thus this book is of prime importance for those interested in the purity and peace of the church. We bought out all the remaining stock of this title from the publisher, and we have less than 70 copies remaining. If you want a copy, please order soon to avoid disappointment, as it is unlikely that this title will be available again in the near future. Related items include: Gentry's USEFULNESS OF CREEDS or OUR REFORMATION HERITAGE." -- SWRB
http://www.swrb.com/newslett/actualnls/DI_ch0.htm

Shaw, Robert, An Exposition of the Confession of Faith of the Westminster Assembly of Divines, 1845 (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books).
" 'All that learning the most profound and extensive, intellect the most acute and searching, and piety the most sincere and earnest, could accomplish, was thus concentrated in the Westminster Assembly's Confession of Faith, which may be safely termed the most perfect statement of Systematic Theology ever framed by the Christian Church,' writes William Hetherington in (The History of the Westminster Assembly of Divines. The WCF is without a doubt the greatest human confession ever written, 'being the chiefest part of that uniformity in religion, which by the Solemn League and Covenant' the British Isles are bound, even to this day, to uphold and defend -- in both church and state! Shaw's Exposition is the standard work on the WCF, for he admittedly states 'that he has not found it necessary to differ from the compilers of the Confession in any one point of doctrine.' This edition includes an introductory essay by Hetherington defending the use of Confessions in general and the WCF in particular. Hetherington also gives a brief outline of the historical context of the period in which the WCF was composed while demonstrating the harmonious nature of the Reformational Creeds and Confessions." -- SWRB
The Reformed Faith: An Exposition Of The Westminster Confession Of Faith, by Robert Shaw with an introductory essay by WM. M. Hetherington
http://www.reformed.org/documents/shaw/index.html

Williamson, G.I., The Westminster Confession of Faith for Study Classes (Philadelphia, PA: The Presbyterian and Reformed Publishing Co., 1969). [31087]
"The Westminster Shorter Catechism is unrivalled as a faithful and concise expression of God's revelation in Scripture. For decades G.I. Williamson's study manuals have served as invaluable tools for instruction in the system of doctrine summarized in this amazing catechism . . ." -- SWRB
Westminster Shorter Catechism With Proof Texts
http://www.reformed.org/documents/WSC_frames.html Westminster Confession of Faith With Scripture Proofs
http://www.reformed.org/documents/wcf_with_proofs/ Scripture Index to the Westminster Standards (The complete Scripture index to the Westminster Confession, Larger and Shorter Catechisms.)
http://www.swrb.com/newslett/actualnls/index01.htm
A Guide to the Westminster Standards: Confession of Faith and Larger Catechism, James Bordwine, (Unicoi, TN: The Trinity Foundation, 1996).
Includes a unique, 100-page topical index to both the Confession and the Catechism.



The Epistle to the Reader

Mr. Thomas Manton's Epistle to the Reader of the Westminster Confession of Faith and Larger and Shorter Catechisms
http://www.swrb.com//newslett/actualnls/famworship.htm
Westminster Shorter Catechism With Proof Texts
http://www.reformed.org/documents/WSC_frames.html



The Shorter Catechism

*BOSTON, THOMAS, Commentary on the Shorter Catechism, 2 volumes (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books, 1993, 1853). A Christian classic.
" `Two large volumes of over 1300 pages! Boston's work is the most comprehensive reference set ever penned on THE WESTMINSTER SHORTER CATECHISM. Concerning THE SHORTER CATECHISM, A.F. Mitchell states '...it is a thoroughly Calvinistic and Puritan catechism, the ripest fruit of the Assembly's thought and experience, maturing and finally fixing the definitions of theological terms to which Puritanism for half a century had been leading up and gradually coming closer and closer to in its legion of catechisms' (The Westminster Assembly...). THE SHORTER CATECHISM is the `king of the catechisms' for shear power of expression, combining logical cogency with succinctness. Boston's exposition is unrivalled; there is nothing else like it. Here you have the cream of Puritan catechisms married to the cream of clear Puritan exposition! This is likely Boston's most important work. A set that will meet numerous needs, ranging from use in family worship, Christian education and personal study, to sermon preparation - and for help in settling debated questions on the Presbytery floor. A one-of-a-kind set of books that will serve your family for generations to come!" -- SWRB
Boston's Commentary on the Westminster Confession
http://www.best.com/~covenant/
Westminster Shorter Catechism With Proof Texts
http://www.reformed.org/documents/WSC_frames.html
Westminster Shorter Catechism Project
"Click on any of the individual questions below to get the answer and Biblical references, as well as links to works by John Flavel, Thomas Watson, Thomas Boston, James Fisher, and John Whitecross, and others."
http://www.shortercatechism.com/

*Brown, John (of Haddington) Essay Towards an Easy Explication of the Shorter Catechism (1845) (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books, 1997).
"The author has taken great care to correct, enlarge, and improve this edition of his catechism, particularly by adding a great number of Scripture texts in order to more clearly elucidate and confirm different points of doctrine and practice." -- SWRB

*Cotton, John (editor) and The Westminster Assembly, New England Primer: Improved for the More Easy Attaining the True Reading of English. To which is added The Assembly of Divines, and Mr. Cotton's catechism. A Christian classic.
"THE NEW ENGLAND PRIMER was the first textbook ever printed in America and was used to teach reading and Bible lessons in our schools until the twentieth century. In fact, many of the Founders and their children learned to read from THE PRIMER. This pocket-size edition is an historical reprint of the 1777 version used in many schools during the Founding Era." -- Book Description
"The New England Primer was one of the greatest books ever published. It went through innumerable editions; it reflected in a marvelous way the spirit of the age that produced it, and contributed, perhaps more than any other book except the Bible, to the molding of those sturdy generations that gave to America its liberty and its institutions."
"The Founding Fathers of this country and other Americans learned to read from this little treasure. There is much that we can learn about them and the way they thought by examining its contents. The true study of history should incorporate the study of what motivated people to do the things they did. This reprint makes for great classroom discussion. It makes for an excellent addition to any American History class at all grade levels and all ages. It is pocket-size, and kids and adults love it. I highly recommend it!" -- Reader Comment
"WEBSTER'S BLUE-BACKED SPELLING BOOK and the NEW ENGLAND PRIMER were basic, foundational textbooks used in the schools of our Republic in the 18th and 19th centuries.
"These two textbooks prove our founding fathers expected moral truths to be taught in every school subject." -- Reader Comment

*Henry, Matthew, The Catechising of Youth and Christ's Favour to Little Children Displayed, 1713 (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, canada: Still Waters Revival Books).
"The two sermons noted above form foundational teaching that every family should be aware of and practice. A faithful ministry and faithful parents, who catechize their children daily, will do more for true Reformation and godliness than just about any other means to this end. Here Henry also adds simple questions to each question of the Westminster Shorter Catechism to help explain it to beginners. Very practical!" -- SWRB
Westminster Shorter Catechism With Proof Texts
http://www.reformed.org/documents/WSC_frames.html

Kelly, Douglas F., Philip B. Rollinson, and Frederick T. Marsh, The Westminster Shorter Catechism in Modern English (Presbyterian & Reformed Publishing Company).
"Since its completion in 1647 the Westminster Shorter Catechism has been unsurpassed as a concise tool for teaching the Reformed understanding of Scripture. Though the truths of the catechism are unchanging, the English language has undergone many changes, which have made using the catechism in its original form increasingly difficult." -- Synopsis

Mitchell, Alexander F., Catechisms of the Second Reformation (1886) (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books, 1997).
"Part 1: The Shorter Catechism and its Puritan Precursors. Part 2: Rutherford's and other Scottish Catechisms of the same epoch. Includes a historical introduction and biographical notices. Explains the composition and sources of the Catechisms of the Westminster Assembly. Gives specimens of the Catechisms which were previously in use among the doctrinal Puritans in England and Scotland and those laid before the Assembly. Mitchell was Professor of Ecclesiastical History at the University of St. Andrews." -- SWRB
Westminster Shorter Catechism With Proof Texts
http://www.reformed.org/documents/WSC_frames.html

*Vincent, Thomas, Shorter Catechism Explained From Scripture (Puritan Paperback Series. Carlisle, PA: The Banner of Truth Trust), 1634, EEBO. [31078]
"Forty Puritans including John Owen, Thomas Manton, Thomas Brooks and Thomas Watson recommended this useful volume as a very worth aid for family instruction. This volume gives parents very simple explanations to take their children through the Westminster Shorter Catechism."
Vincent, Thomas. An explicatory catechism: or an explanation of the Assembly's shorter catechism. ... By Thomas Vincent, ... Glasgow, 1777. (ECCO) Gale Document Number CW3319412765
A Commentary on the Shorter Catechism, Thomas Vincent, Alternate title: A Commentary on the Shorter Catechism
http://www.e4.net
Westminster Shorter Catechism With Proof Texts
http://www.reformed.org/documents/WSC_frames.html
Westminster Shorter Catechism Project
"Click on any of the individual questions below to get the answer and Biblical references, as well as links to works by John Flavel, Thomas Watson, Thomas Boston, James Fisher, and John Whitecross, and others."
http://www.shortercatechism.com/

Vincent, Thomas, 1634-1678, An explicatory catechism, or, An explanation of the Assemblies Shorter catechism wherein all the answers in the Assemblies catechism are taken abroad in under questions and answers, the truths explained, and proved by reason and scripture, several cases of conscience resolved, some chief controversies in religion stated : with arguments aganst divers errors, itself, for the more and clear and through understanding of what is therein learned / by Thomas Vincent ..., 1673, EEBO.

*Watson, Thomas, 1620-1686 Body of Divinity (Carlisle, PA: The Banner of Truth Trust, 1965, 1890), EEBO.
"The first book published by the Trust, this has been one of the best sellers and consistently the most useful and influential of our publications . . . It deals with the foremost doctrinal and experimental truths of the Christian faith . . . It is based on the Westminster Assembly's Shorter Catechism, in which the main principles of Christianity that lie scattered in the Scriptures are brought together and set forth in the form of question and answer. This catechism is unsurpassed for its `terse exactitutde of definition' and `logical elaboration' of the fundamentals. . . . Watson conveys his thorough doctrinal and experimental knowledge of the truth in such an original, concise, pithy, pungent, racy, rich, and illustrative style that he is rightly regarded as the most readable of the Puritans." -- Publisher's Annotation
"As an introduction to Puritan theology, as a short and sweet course in Christian doctrine, as devotional reading, and as a preacher's gold-mine, Watson's work can hardly be praised too highly." -- J.I. Packer.
"Contains Watson's exposition of the Westminster Shorter Catechism, excluding the Lord's Prayer and the Ten Commandments." -- GCB
Westminster Shorter Catechism Project: Body of Divinity Contained in Sermons upon the Assembly's Catechism by the Rev. Thomas Watson
http://www.bpc.org/resources/vincent/wsc_vi_001.html
Westminster Shorter Catechism With Proof Texts
http://www.reformed.org/documents/WSC_frames.html
Scripture Index to the Westminster Standards (The complete Scripture index to the Westminster Confession, Larger and Shorter Catechisms.)
http://www.swrb.com/newslett/actualnls/index01.htm
Westminster Shorter Catechism Project
"Click on any of the individual questions below to get the answer and Biblical references, as well as links to works by John Flavel, Thomas Watson, Thomas Boston, James Fisher, and John Whitecross, and others."
http://www.shortercatechism.com/
A Guide to the Westminster Standards: Confession of Faith and Larger Catechism
(Unicoi, TN: The Trinity Foundation, 1996).
Includes a unique, 100-page topical index to both the Confession and the Catechism.
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0940931303/webedbiblicalcou

*Watson, Thomas, The Lord's Prayer (Carlisle, PA: The Banner of Truth Trust, 1960, 1890), EEBO. [31081]
"Watson's three works on the Westminster Shorter Catechism is concluded by his exposition of the Lord's Prayer. In this book he analyses in detail the Preface to the prayer and the six petitions which make it up. His treatment of the second petition ('thy Kingdom come') is exceptionally full and illuminating, This book affords instruction and practical help to praying Christians." -- SWRB
"A full and powerful Puritan exposition of the Lord's Prayer. So excellent that it may be without equal." -- GCB
"A part of the writer's famous BODY OF DIVINITY. An excellent exposition combining sound doctrine with practical application." -- Cyril J. Barber
Westminster Shorter Catechism With Proof Texts
http://www.reformed.org/documents/WSC_frames.html

*Watson, Thomas, The Ten Commandments (Carlisle, PA: The Banner of Truth Trust, 1962), EEBO. [31082]
"In this book Watson (c. 1620-1686) continues his exposition of the Shorter Catechism drawn up by the Westminster Assembly. Watson was one of the most popular preachers in London during the Puritan era . . . The series of three volumes, of which this is the second (the Body of Divinity is first and The Lord's Prayer third), makes an ideal introduction to Puritan literature. There are few matters about which the Puritans differ more from present-day Christians than in their assessment of the importance of the ten commandments. The commandments, they held, are the first thing in Christianity which the natural man needs to be taught and they should be the daily concern of the Christian to the last. In this book Watson examines the moral law as a whole as well as bringing out the meaning and force of each particular commandment. In view of the important function of the law in Christian life and evangelism, this is a most valuable volume." -- SWRB
"The most famous commentary on the Ten Commandments was by Lancelot Andrews (1555-1626), a huge folio. . . ." -- Jay P. Green, Sr.
"Excellent study. Highly recommended for personal and group study. The need for understanding the Law of God is always of great importance for the Christian. Watson is an excellent expositor of it." -- GCB
Commentary on the First Table of the Decalogue by Thomas Watson from THE TEN COMMANDMENTS by Thomas Watson in WESTMINSTER SHORTER CATECHISM, 3 volumes, including A BODY OF DIVINITY, THE LORD'S PRAYER, and THE TEN COMMANDMENTS (Carlisle, PA: The Banner of Truth Trust, 1965).
The Ten Commandments, Thomas Watson
http://www.iclnet.org/pub/resources/text/ipb-e/epl-watson-10cm.html

*Westminster Divines, Shorter Catechism with Scripture Proofs (Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books).
"Catechisms have been greatly employed in the Church since the days of the Apostles. A great revival of their use took place at the Reformation. None rivals the Westminster Assembly's Shorter Catechism, for extensive use, succinctness, or clarity. Richard Baxter said of it in his day, "It is the best Catechism I ever saw -- a most excellent sum of the Christian faith and doctrine, and a fit test to try the orthodoxy of its teachers." Excellent for training youth, it has been used with profit starting as early as three years of age." -- SWRB
Westminster Shorter Catechism With Proof Texts
http://www.reformed.org/documents/WSC_frames.html

Related WebLinks

The Shorter Catechism of the Westminster Assembly Explained and Proved from Scripture, by Thomas Vincent
http://www.bpc.org/resources/vincent/wsc_vi_001.html

Westminster Shorter Catechism Project
"Click on any of the individual questions below to get the answer and Biblical references, as well as links to works by John Flavel, Thomas Watson, Thomas Boston, James Fisher, and John Whitecross, and others."
http://www.shortercatechism.com/

Westminster Shorter Catechism With Proof Texts, EEBO.
http://www.reformed.org/documents/WSC_frames.html

Westminster Larger Catechism With Proof Texts, EEBO.
http://www.reformed.org/documents/wlc_w_proofs/WLC_frames.html

The Shorter Catechism Illustrated, John Whitecross
http://www.bpc.org/resources/whitecross/wsc_wh_001.html

A Commentary on the Shorter Catechism, Alexander Whyte
http://www.bpc.org/resources/whyte/wsc_whyte_001.html

An Exposition of the Assembly's Shorter Catechism, John Flavel
http://www.bpc.org/resources/flavel/wsc_fl_001.html

Bible Presbyterian Church Westminster Shorter Catechism Project
http://wsc.bpc.org/



The Larger Catechism

THE LARGER CATECHISM; Agreed upon by the Assembly of Divines at Westminster, with the assistance of Commissioners from the Church of Scotland, as a part of the covenanted uniformity in religion betwixt the Churches of Christ in the Kingdoms of Scotland, England, and Ireland and approved anno 1648, by the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland, to be a directory for catechising such as have made some proficiency in the knowledge of the grounds of religion, with the proofs from the Scripture. -- The long title for THE LARGER CATECHISM

*Edwards, Jonathan, 1703-1758 The End for Which God Created the World (Philadelphia: Printed and sold by R. Aitken & Son, no. 22 Market Street, 1791).
"Two dissertations ... / by the late reverend, learned and pious Jonathan Edwards, A.M., president of the college in New-Jersey. Concerning the end for which God created the world."
A Dissertation Concerning the End for Which God Made the World
http://www.ccel.org/e/edwards/works/vol1/end_of_world/end.htm

Edwards, Jonathan. A dissertation on God's last end in the creation of the world. By the late President Edwards, A.M. Revised and corrected by the Rev. C. De Coetlogon, A.M. London, 1788. (ECCO) Gale Document Number CW3320729743

Manton, Thomas, 1620-1677, A practical exposition of the Lord's-Prayer by ... Thomas Manton, 1684, EEBO.
Notes: Contains engraved portrait frontispiece.

Ridgeley, Thomas, Commentary on the Larger Catechism (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books).
"Originally entitled: A Body of Divinity: Wherein the Doctrines of the Christian Religion are Explained and Defended. Being the Substance of Several Lectures on the Assembly's Larger Catechism, we have re-titled it to better reflect its contents for contemporary readers. Consisting of over 1300 pages, this massive and extensive two-volume commentary on the Westminster Larger Catechism is unrivaled in scope or extensiveness. Ridgeley himself notes, in 'The Author's Preface' (p. ix), 'The work is large, but the vast variety of subjects will render it more tolerable. . . . especially since it is rather designed to be read in families than committed to memory . . .' The editor of this edition, John Wilson, pronounces Ridgeley's work as 'the best book of its class,' stating, 'no book in the English language, or, so far as I know, in any other, will serve so efficiently the purposes of a daily companion to a reflecting Christian in his inquiries into Divine truth, or a guide to a candidate for the Christian ministry in introducing him to his theological studies (p. xi). 'In 1731 appeared the first edition of Mr. Ridgeley's great work -- that in connection with which chiefly his name lives in history, and whose influence, as an instrument of good, will probably render him celebrated and useful for generations to come . . .(p. xxii).' Moreover he continues, 'a taste, however, for the racy and substantial theological writings of the days of Britain's moral giants has of late revived; and it will scarcely fail to adopt, as one of the richest dishes of its multifarious banquet for the intellect and the soul, Dr. Ridgeley's Body of Divinity (p. xxi).' Additionally, Wilson concludes his 'Life of the Author' with these words, 'His method of reasoning he has adapted to the capacities of those who are unacquainted with the abstruse terms made use of by metaphysicians and schoolmen, and when introduced into subjects of theology, have a tendency rather to perplex than to improve the mind. His scheme of divinity is evidently Calvinistic; but; then, he has explained his subjects with so much moderation and latitude, as to obviate many of the objections raised against the system of doctrines that passes under that name. Upon the whole, it is probable that the English language does not furnish a work of this nature that, for perspicuity of language, extent of research, accuracy of judgment, and judicious description of the numerous subjects that fall under examination, any way equals this work of Dr. Ridgeley . . . he was accounted one of the most considerable divines of his age' (emphasis added, p. xxiii)." -- SWRB
Westminster Larger Catechism With Proof Texts
http://www.reformed.org/documents/wlc_w_proofs/WLC_frames.html

*Robbins, John W., Ecclesiastical Megalomania: The Economic and Political Thought of the Roman Catholic Church (Unicoi, TN: The Trinity Foundation), ISBN: 0940931753 9780940931756.
The following presents, by contrast, what a Christian society should look like.
"This book is a detailed examination of the official statements of the Vatican on economic and political matters. It demonstrates the collectivism and totalitarianism of the Roman Catholic Church-State. It is the only such book written by a Christian in the twentieth century.
"This book explores the conflict between Roman Catholic social thought and human freedom, relying on official pronouncements from the Vatican to show that the political and economic theory of the Roman Church-State justifies feudalism, corporativism, liberation theology, the welfare state, and fascism.
"Dr. John W. Robbins attended Grove City College (A.B. 1969) and The Johns Hopkins University (M.A. 1970, Ph.D. 1973). He has served as chief of staff for a Member of Congress [Ron Paul of Texas], editor of The Freeman magazine, Economist for The Heritage Foundation, and Professor of Political Philosophy in The Freedom School." -- Publisher's Annotation

Power tends to corrupt and absolute power corrupts absolutely. Great men are almost always bad men, even when they exercise influence and not authority: still more when you superadd the tendency or the certainty of corruption by authority. -- John Emerich Edward Dalberg, Lord Acton (1834-1902) in a letter to Mandell Creighton, April 5, 1887 quoted by Gertrude Himmelfarb in Acton, Essays on Freedom and Power, pp. 335-36 (1972)
"As the world focuses it attention on the papacy, we ought to recall Lord Acton, the great Roman Catholic historian of the 19th century. Many have heard the aphorism, 'Power tends to corrupt; absolute power corrupts absolutely,' though it is usually misquoted as 'Power corrupts.' Few who have heard it, however, know who its author was: John Emerich Edward Dalberg, better known as Lord Acton. Fewer still realize that Acton used the aphorism in opposing the papacy, the absolute monarchy of the Roman Catholic Church.
"Acton's criticisms of the papacy and the Roman Church are some of most damning ever leveled against those institutions, and they are virtually unknown today. Yet to anyone seriously concerned about religious and political freedom, Acton’s views on the Roman Church, his own church, in particular his condemnation of the papacy, ought to be of great interest. Unfortunately, contemporary theological correctness has a taboo against criticism of Catholicism.
"Acton kept a notebook on the Inquisition in which he wrote:
[The] object of the Inquisition [was] not to combat sin -- for the sin was not judged by it unless accompanied by [theological] error. Nor even to put down error. For it punished untimely and unseemly remarks the same as blasphemy. Only unity. This became an outward, fictitious, hypocritical unity. The gravest sin was pardoned, but it was death to deny the donation of Constantine. [The Donation of Constantine was a document forged in the eighth century in which the Roman Emperor Constantine willed the Western Roman Empire to the Pope. The Roman Church taught that the Donation was genuine, and the legal basis for the pope's civil authority, for centuries. -- JR] So men learnt that outward submission must be given. All this [was] to promote authority more than faith. When ideas were punished more severely than actions -- for all this time the Church was softening the criminal law, and saving men from the consequences of crime: – and the Donation was put on a level with God's own law -- men understood that authority went before sincerity.
"Acton believed that the Inquisition was the institution by which the medieval papacy had to be condemned or acquitted. Just as a man charged with murder is judged for a single act, though be may be kind to his mother and a great philanthropist, so the papacy must be judged for the Inquisition. To Mandell Creighton, an Anglican priest, Acton wrote:
I cannot accept your canon that we are to judge Pope and King unlike other men, with a favourable presumption that they did no wrong. If there is any presumption it is the other way, against holders of power, increasing as the power increases. Historic responsibility has to make up for the want of legal responsibility. Power tends to corrupt, and absolute power corrupts absolutely. Great men are almost always bad men, even when they exercise influence and not authority: still more when you superadd the tendency or the certainty of corruption by authority. There is no worse heresy than that the office sanctifies the holder of it. . . . For many years my view of Catholic controversy has been governed by the following chain of reasoning: 1. A crime does not become a good deed by being committed for the good of a church. 2. The theorist who approves the act is no better than the culprit who commits it. 3. The divine or historian who defends the theorist incurs the same blame. . . . To commit murder is the mark of a moment, exceptional. To defend it is constant, and shows a more perverted conscience.
"Acton turned his attention to other crimes of the Roman Church as well. Beginning on Sunday, August 24, 1572, tens of thousands of French Huguenots were massacred by the Catholics. Overnight, thousands were murdered, and the murders continued for several months. The massacre began in Paris. The sign of the cross was everywhere, and the murders took on the air of a crusade, a holy war against the infidels. The banks of the Seine became a slaughterhouse. Men, women, children, and infants were stabbed or dragged by a rope around the neck to be thrown into the river. The murder, looting, and rape went on for days in Paris.
"The Pope, Gregory XIII, reacted immediately to this Catholic Holocaust: He delivered a complimentary speech, and commended the King of France, Charles IX, who 'has also displayed before our Most Holy Master and this entire assembly the most splendid virtues which can shine in the exercise of power.' The Pope commissioned a mural in honor of the great occasion; he ordered salutes fired for Charles; he had a commemorative seal struck; and in a horrible blasphemy he ordered a special Te Deum sung. Less than two years later, at the age of 24, King Charles died in extreme pain with blood oozing from his pores. His last words were pleas to God for pardon for the murders.
"The massacre was a matter of controversy in 1868 when Acton wrote an essay in the North British Review. He concluded his long essay by saying that there was no evidence to absolve the Roman Church of premeditated murder. Acton argued that it was not only facts that condemned the papacy for this heinous crime, but the whole body of casuistry developed by the church that made it an act of Christian duty and mercy to kill a heretic so that he might be removed from sin. Acton pointed out that only when the Roman Church could no longer rely on force but had to make its case before public opinion did it seek to explain away its murders. 'The same motive which had justified the murder now promoted the lie,' he wrote. A bodyguard of lies was fabricated to protect the papacy from guilt for this monstrous sin. Acton wrote:
The story is much more abominable than we all believed. . . . S.B. [St. Bartholomew's] is the greatest crime of modern times. It was committed on principles professed by Rome. It was approved, sanctioned, and praised by the papacy. The Holy See went out of its way to signify to the world, by permanent and solemn acts, how entirely it admired a king who slaughtered his subjects treacherously, because they were Protestants. To proclaim forever that because a man is a Protestant it is a pious deed to cut his throat in the night. . . .
"For three centuries the Roman church's canon law had affirmed that the killing of an excommunicated person was not murder, and that allegiance need not be kept with heretical rulers. Murder and treason were part of the Roman church’s official teachings. Charles IX was acting as a good Catholic, and he was highly praised by the pope for his murders.
"In 1867 Pope Pius IX summoned a general council of the Roman Church to be held in Rome in 1870. It was the first general council of the Roman Church since the sixteenth century Council of Trent, at which the schismatic Roman Church had condemned all the truths of the Reformation. This time the Pope was determined to establish himself as the infallible sovereign of the Roman Church.
"Acton thought that the time of the council would be better spent abolishing many of the 'reforms' made by the Council of Trent, reforms which had perpetuated in the Roman Church a spirit of intolerant absolutism and 'austere immorality.' He opposed the doctrine of papal infallibility, because, as an historian, he knew the popes were not infallible. Acton wrote:
A man is not honest who accepts all the Papal decisions in questions of morality, for they have often been distinctly immoral; or who approves the conduct of the Popes in engrossing power, for it was stained with perfidy and falsehood; or who is ready to alter his convictions at their command, for his conscience is guided by no principle.
"After studying the history of the popes, Acton wrote:
The papacy contrived murder and massacre on the largest and also on the most cruel and inhuman scale. They were not only wholesale assassins but they made the principle of assassination a law of the Christian Church and a condition of salvation. . . . [The Papacy] is the fiend skulking behind the Crucifix.
Massachusetts Attorney General, "The Sexual Abuse of Children in the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Boston," Thomas F. Reilly, Massachusetts Attorney General
"The mistreatment of children was so massive and so prolonged that it borders on the unbelievable," says the July 23 [2003] report of Massachusetts Attorney General Thomas F. Reilly. More than 1,000 minors were likely abused by priests over the past six decades."
This is the 79-page report in its entirety.
http://www.votf.org/ago/archdiocese.pdf
Martin Luther, John Calvin, John Knox, Samuel Rutherford, John Owen, Thomas Manton, The Westminster Assembly, James Renwick, Archibald Mason, Christopher Ness, Francis Turretin, The Reformed Presbytery, David Steel, James R. Willson, Alexander M'Leod, William L. Roberts, James Aiken Wylie, Andrew Wilet, Henry Wilkinson, James Wylie, Patrick Fairbairn, James Aiken, Andrew Wilet, Alexander Hislop, Francis Nigel Lee, Arthur W. Pink, and so forth, and so on, have all believed and argued in print that the seated Pope is the Anti-Christ of the Bible.
The Roman Church-State is "the world's oldest, largest, most powerful and most influential politico-ecclesiastical institution" and it "may also be the world's wealthiest." It is the ultimate model for every ruler who lusts for power and wealth. The playing out of its political and economic thought may be seen in nearly every institution or organization in the world.
Pope's visit means 3 White House firsts.
President says 'man of faith' and conviction deserves the special treatment

Associated Press, April. 13, 2008
"WASHINGTON - The leader of the world's 1 billion Roman Catholics has been to the White House only once in history. That changes this week, and President Bush is pulling out all the stops: driving out to a suburban military base to meet Pope Benedict XVI's plane, bringing a giant audience to the South Lawn and hosting a fancy East Room dinner.
"These are all firsts.
"A crowd of up to 12,000 is due at the White House on Wednesday morning for the pope's official, pomp-filled arrival ceremony. It will feature the U.S. and Holy See anthems, a 21-gun salute, and the U.S. Army Old Guard Fife and Drum Corps. Both men will make remarks before their Oval Office meeting and a send-off for his popemobile down Pennsylvania Avenue.
"The president explained the special treatment -- particularly the airport greeting.
" 'One, he speaks for millions. Two, he doesn't come as a politician; he comes as a man of faith,' Bush told the EWTN Global Catholic Network in an interview aired Friday. He added that he wanted to honor Benedict's conviction that 'there's right and wrong in life, that moral relativism has a danger of undermining the capacity to have more hopeful and free societies. . . .' "
"This week makes Bush the record-holder, with a total of five meetings with two popes. . . ."
"The current pope's approach may be softer than that of John Paul, who turned from Bush's presentation to him of the Medal of Freedom in 2004 to read a statement about his 'grave concern' over events in Iraq."
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/24096388/
Bush Scandals
An extensive resource. Includes websites for the Savings and Loan Scandal of the 1980s, considered the largest theft in the history of the world, involving Neil Bush, a brother of George W., the Florida's Voting Scandal of 2001 in which Al Gore lost the presidential election. Jeb Bush, another brother of George W., was Governor of Florida and had promised to deliver the state for his brother. Other sites treat George W. Bush's suspected involvement in 911 [911 is, of course, analagous to Roosevelt's Pearl Harbor]. Note particularly "Bush Family Machinations, 1918-2000," a time-line of Bush Family crimes prior to Election 2000.
http://news4florida.tripod.com/index1.html
The Panic of '08. Lew Rockwell Interviews Ron Paul, September 18, 2008
A podcast.
http://www.lewrockwell.com/podcast/?p=episode&name=2008-09-18_029_ron_paul_talks_to_lew_rockwell.mp3

Wishart, William, parson of Restalrigg, An exposition of the Lords prayer. Delivered in two and twenty lectures, at the church of Lieth in Scotland; by Mr William Wischart parson of Restalrigg, 1633, EEBO.

Related WebLinks

Westminster Larger Catechism With Proof Texts, EEBO.
http://www.reformed.org/documents/wlc_w_proofs/WLC_frames.html

Boston, Thomas, Boston's Commentary on the Westminster Confession
Thomas Boston
http://www.best.com/~covenant/



The Sum of Saving Knowledge

The Sum of Saving Knowledge: A brief sum of Christian doctrine contained in Holy Scriptures and holden forth in the Confession of faith & catechism agreed upon by the Assembly of Divines at Westminster and received by the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland., David Dickson and James Durham, EEBO.
http://www.covenanter.org/Westminster/sumofsavingknowledge.htm



The National Covenant

Henderson, Alexander, The National Covenant (1638) and Solemn League and Covenant (1643) (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books, 1997).
The National Covenant, a Scottish Presbyterian document, primarily composed by Alexander Henderson and Archibald Johnstone of Wariston. It was composed in opposition to the 'policies of Charles I. Written in the context of the riots resulting from the imposition of 'Laud's Liturgy' in 1637 and the King's refusal to receive the petitions of supplicants for redress, the National Covenant was an appeal . . . to defend the true Reformed religion, and to decline the recent innovations in worship decreed by the King.' (DICTIONARY OF SCOTTISH CHURCH HISTORY AND THEOLOGY, 620). Furthermore, it was 'an assertion by the Kirk of freedom from royal or state control, a personal oath of allegiance to Jesus Christ, the only Head of the Church, the King of kings, and a dedication of life to him. It stemmed directly from God's covenant of grace, was in the succession of those earlier bonds the Scots had made with God for his people's defence and deliverance, and represented a call in the Pauline sense to 'conduct themselves a citizens.' (Idem.) This covenant (and the Solemn League and Covenant described below) are still binding on all true Presbyterians and the hearty and steadfast renewal of these faithful documents would constitute a mighty means toward modern reformation, seeing that much of the contemporary church and all modern states have set themselves 'against the Lord, and against his anointed' (Ps. 2:2); excepting, maybe, the African state of Zambia, which seems to be presently reforming, but not yet covenanted to the Lord. The Solemn League and Covenant was first of all a religious covenant and secondly a civil league. 'After noting that they had one king and one Reformed religion and expressing their concern about the estate of both the Church and kingdom of England and Scotland, the signatories swear to preserve 'the Reformed Religion in the Church of Scotland' and the Reformation of religion in England and to bring the churches to the 'nearest Conjunction and Uniformity in Religion', confession, government, and worship. They also bound themselves to extirpate popery and prelacy as well as superstition, heresy and whatever is contrary to sound doctrine . . . to bring to trial all who hinder such reformation of religion or divide the king from his people and to continue such 'to all Posterity' and not suffer themselves to be withdrawn from 'this blessed Union and Conjunction' (Ibid, pp. 786-789). This covenant gave teeth to the work of the Westminster Assembly and united three nations under the Lordship of Jesus Christ. It was publicly taken by the Westminster Divines and the English parliament on September 25th. 'On the 9th of October the king issued a proclamation from Oxford, denouncing this document as 'in truth nothing else but a traitorous and seditious combination against us and the established religion of this kingdom;' straitly charging and commanding all his loving subjects, upon their allegiance, 'that they presume not to take the said seditious and traitorous Covenant.' And at last an order was issued by the Parliament, in February 1644, commanding the Covenant to be taken throughout the kingdom of England by all persons above the age of 18 years; which order was accompanied by an exhortation prepared by the Assembly of Divines. In Scotland, as soon as information was received of what had taken place in London, the Committee of Estates ordered the Covenant to be subscribed by all ranks and conditions of people, on penalty of the confiscation of property, or such other punishment as his Majesty and the parliament might resolve to inflict' (Hetherington (The History of the Westminster Assembly of Divines, pp. 127-128). Furthermore, Hetherington goes on to call this bond 'the wisest, the sublimest, and the most sacred document ever framed by uninspired men' (p. 134). If you want to understand Presbyterianism these two covenant documents offer as much light as any others we know of. They are inextricably linked to the Westminster standards, historical testimony and the covenanted reformation. Some still believe that they will once again be renewed on an international basis near the beginning of the millennium, in preparation for the days when the 'earth shall be full of the knowledge of the Lord, as the waters cover the sea' (Isa. 11:9). With this sentiment we wholeheartedly concur!" -- SWRB
Westminster Assembly, National Covenant
http://www.covenanter.org/Westminster/nationalcovenant.htm

Henderson, Alexander, Preparing for Covenant Renewal (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books, 1997). An audio cassette.
"Originally preached on the occasion of the swearing of the National Covenant of Scotland (1638). This sermon is read (by Lyndon Dohms) from the book Sermons, Prayers and Pulpit Addresses by Henderson. It is a representative example of the focus of the covenanted Reformation in its earlier stages.

*Price, Greg, The National Covenant of Scotland (Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books), 2 audio cassettes,
"This covenant has been considered (along with the Solemn League and Covenant) as one of two major historical covenants binding the moral person of the church -- since the days of the covenants of Old Testament Israel. Price gives a fascinating account of what led up to this watershed document, what is contained in it (and why) and shows why this is of great importance to the church today. If you are interested in the present testimony concerning the Lord's covenanted Zion, this is one of the best places to start. Teaching like this has not been heard in North America for some time and it marks the revival of the most consistent Calvinism that the church has attained thus far in history." -- SWRB

See also: Selection of covenant heads for positions of leadership



The Solemn League and Covenant

*CARYL, JOSEPH (1602-1673), The nature, solemnity, grounds, property and benefits of a sacred covenant: together with the duties of those who enter into such a covenant: delivered in a sermon at Westminster, at that public convention (ordered by the Honourable House of Commons) for the taking of the Covenant, by all such, of all degrees, as willingly presented themselves, upon Friday, Octob. 6 1643 (London, England: printed by E.G. for John Rothwell and Giles Calvert, 1643). Available on The Amazing Christian Library, DVD Six, CD #32. Available on Puritan Bookshelf 32 CD Set, #2 (Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books, 2001). Also available in EEBO, OCLC: 40236435.
A sermond on the Solemn League and Covenant, Nehemiah IX, 38.

*Greg Price, The Solemn League and Covenant (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books, 1997). An audio cassette.
"Hetherington, concerning the Solemn League and Covenant (the epitome of Second Reformation attainments) writes, 'no man who is able to understand its nature, and to feel and appreciate its spirit and its aim, will deny it to be the wisest, the sublimest, and the most sacred document ever framed by uninspired men' (The History of the Westminster Assembly of Divines, [1856] SWRB reprint 1993, p. 134). What took place during the days of the writing and international subscriptions to the Solemn League and Covenant has been cited before as a foretaste of the millennial glory to come. The Reformed Presbytery writes, 'These modern pigmies are too far dwarfed in intellectual stature to measure the altitude, of our glorious Covenanted Reformation -- a Reformation which, imbedded in the law and the covenant of God, has already brought civil and ecclesiastical freedom to many millions; and which is doubtless destined to be laid in the foundation of reconstructed society in the millennial period of the world' (A Short Vindication of Our Covenanted Reformation, [1879] SWRB reprint 1996, p. 4). In this lecture Price gives a brief history of the three major causes leading up to the Solemn League and Covenant. These were: 1.) the erroneous beliefs and practices associated with the so-called divine right of Kings; 2.) the apostasy of Prelacy in doctrine (e.g. the Arminianism of Rome), worship (tolerating and introducing anti-regulativist Romish superstitions), and government (against the divine right of Presbyterianism) -- all three of these areas being a practical denial of sola Scriptura in that man ordained elements were idolatrously adopted over those clearly prescribed in Scripture; 3.) the desire of the Reformers for a covenanted Presbyterian uniformity in church and state. Price shows how many of the national Protestant churches of the day (outside of the British Isles) were also looking into swearing this covenant (including the Netherlands, France, Switzerland and Sweden), as a means to biblical unity and uniformity. In fact, this covenant was framed (primarily by Alexander Henderson) with the intention of uniting Protestants worldwide. As Price shows, this goal quickly unraveled with the coming to power of that Judas of the Covenant (Cromwell), his army and the Independents. The descending obligation of this covenant is also covered, and application is made to modern nations (like the USA, Canada, etc.) who are the national posterity of the original covenanters. Application is also made to the apostate modern church (and Price names names). It is also shown how this covenant was a term of communion in the church and how negative civil sanctions were to be applied to those who publicly opposed the Solemn League and Covenant -- students could not even enter college without proof of subscription. Price uses various historical citations from The Acts of the General Assemblies of the Church of Scotland From the Year 1638 to the Year 1649 Inclusive (available from SWRB as a rare bound photocopy) to demonstrate these historical facts. Later defections from the covenanted Reformation, such as those by Charles II and William's civilly and ecclesiastically corrupted Revolution settlement are also dealt with. The second half of the tape summarizes the six articles of the Solemn League and Covenant; concentrating on the biblical (civil, ecclesiastical and individual) responsibilities that were sworn in this covenant. Application is made to our day and the tape closes with some questions regarding American history and government and the Canadian constitution. The Solemn League and Covenant (because it was agreeable to the Word of God) formed the foundation of the Second Reformation internationally (as is seen in the letter received by the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland on June 4, 1644, from the Scottish commissioners [Rutherford, Gillespie, et al] at the Westminster Assembly; cf. The Acts . . ., pp. 228, 250). This covenant still binds the church and many nations today, and until these 'moral persons' renew this covenant (in spirit and in truth) the Lord will continue to prosecute the quarrel of His covenant. Thus, this is an exceedingly important tape as it explains one of the major, modern causes of God's wrath upon the nations and the church. When the churches and nations are granted repentance in (or preparing for) the millennium they will be found 'going forth by the footsteps of the flock' (Song 1:8) and not turned 'aside by the flock of thy companions' (i.e. those that appear religious but are actually a hindrance to the work of the building of Christ's kingdom, Song of Solomon 1:7, cf. Douglas' Strictures on Occasional Hearing, [1820] SWRB reprint 1996); and there is no 'footstep of the flock' more clearly distinguished in the bedrock of history (since the second century) than the Solemn League and Covenant.
The Solemn League and Covenant by Greg Price
http://sphynx.idontknow.com/swrb/solemn.ram
The Solemn League and Covenant
http://www.swrb.com/newslett/actualnls/crtsol.htm

TRACT, A testimony to the truth of Jesus Christ and to our Solemn League and Covenant . . . , Ephes. 6:14,15; 2 Tim. 1:7,8, 1648, Additional Title: A testimony to the trueth of Jesus Christ, and to our Solemn League and Covenant, EEBO.

See also: The application of scripture to the corporate bodies of church and state, Selection of covenant heads for positions of leadership

Related WebLinks

Reformation Eschatology at Still Waters Revival Books
http://www.swrb.com/Puritan/reformation-eschatology.htm



The Directory for the Public Worship of God

*Westminster Assembly (1643-1652), The Westminster Confession of Faith (Glasgow, Scotland [Free Presbyterian Publications, 133 Woodlands Road, Glasgow G3 6LE]: Free Presbyterian Publication, 1994). ISBN 0902506080 (casebound) and ISBN 0902506358 (paperback), Still Waters Revival Books, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Also available from Crown and Covenant Publications:
http://www.crownandcovenant.com/product_p/ds115.htm
" 'The product of Puritan conflict,' stated Shedd, reaching 'a perfection of statement never elsewhere achieved.' All that learning the most profound and extensive, intellect the most acute and searching, and piety the most sincere and earnest, could accomplish, was thus concentrated in the Westminster Assembly's Confession of Faith, which may be safely termed the most perfect statement of Systematic Theology ever framed by the Christian Church,' writes Hetherington (The History of the Westminster Assembly of Divines), p. 345. Concerning the Shorter Catechism, which is one of the items also included in this book, Mitchell notes: 'it is a thoroughly Calvinistic and Puritan catechism, the ripest fruit of the Assembly's thought and experience, maturing and finally fixing the definitions of theological terms to which Puritanism for half a century had been leading up and gradually coming closer and closer to in its legion of catechisms' (Westminster Assembly: Its History and Standards, p. 431). The Westminster Confession of Faith is the greatest of all the creeds of the Christian church. The church of Christ cannot be creedless and live. Especially in an age of doubt and confusion, it is her duty to define and proclaim the one true faith. Nowhere has the Reformed church done this so effectively as in the Westminster Confession and family of documents. This book represents Reformed thinking at its purest and best. It was intended, as part of the Covenanted Reformation taking place during its compilation, to be adopted as the binding confessional standard for every individual, family, court, church, and legislature in the British Isles." -- SWRB
This is considered to be the definitive publication of the Westminster family of documents. It includes the following:
  1. To the Christian Reader, Especially Heads of Families, Mr. Thomas Manton's Epistle to the Reader,
  2. The Confession of Faith (1646), the full and original edition with Scripture proofs written out,
  3. The Larger Catechism with Scripture proofs written out,
  4. The Shorter Catechism with Scripture proofs written out,
  5. The Sum of Saving Knowledge,
  6. The National Covenant,
  7. The Solemn League and Covenant,
  8. A Solemn Acknowledgement of Publick Sins and Breaches of the Covenant; and a Solemn Engagement to all the Duties Contained Therein
    CD #1, Reformation Bookshelf 30 CD Set
    http://www.swrb.com/Puritan/reformation-bookshelf-CDs.htm
  9. The Directory for the Public Worship of God,
  10. The Form of Presbyterial Church Government, and
  11. The Directory for Family Worship.
The Westminster Confession of Faith is said to be the finest summary of The Holy Bible available. It is recommended for daily devotions. Among the ten greatest works in the English language.
"The Westminster Confession of Faith (The Westminster Standards) and Related Works: A Study Guide"
http://www.lettermen2.com/suggest.html
For commentaries see the following topical listing:
"The Westminster Confession of Faith (The Westminster Standards) and Related Works"
http://www.lettermen2.com/bcrr9cha.html#wcf
Westminster Larger Catechism With Proof Texts
http://www.reformed.org/documents/wlc_w_proofs/WLC_frames.html
Westminster Confession of Faith With Scripture Proofs
http://www.reformed.org/documents/wcf_with_proofs/
Scripture Index to the Westminster Standards (The complete Scripture index to the Westminster Confession, Larger and Shorter Catechisms.)
http://www.swrb.com/newslett/actualnls/index01.htm
Bordwine, James, A Guide to the Westminster Standards: Confession of Faith and Larger Catechism (Unicoi, TN: (The Trinity Foundation, 1996).
Includes a unique, 100-page topical index to both the Confession and the Catechism.
The Westminster Confession of Faith (1646) with all its subordinate documents in searchable format are found on CD #1 of the Reformation Bookshelf 30 CD Set
http://www.swrb.com/Puritan/reformation-bookshelf-CDs.htm.
Westminster Assembly and Related Documents
http://www.covenanter.org/Westminster/westminsterhome.htm
The Significance of The Westminster Standards as a Creed
http://www.fpcr.org/blue_banner_articles/signific.htm
Heresies Defined and the Necessity of Heresies Explained, by George Gillespie, Scottish Commissioner to the Assembly of Divines at Westminster
http://www.truecovenanter.com/gillespie/ggilles09.html
The Shorter Catechism With Scripture Proofs (Carlisle, PA [P.O. Box 621, Carlisle 17013, USA]: The Banner of Truth Trust).
Arguably the greatest tract ever created, all factors considered.
http://www.reformed.org/documents/WSC_frames.html
Westminster Shorter Catechism Project
"Click on any of the individual questions below to get the answer and Biblical references, as well as links to works by John Flavel, Thomas Watson, Thomas Boston, James Fisher, and John Whitecross, and others."
http://www.shortercatechism.com/

Related WebLinks

The Directory for the Public Worship of God, EEBO.
http://www.covenanter.org/Westminster/directoryforfamilyworship.htm



The Form of Presbyterial Church Government

The Form of Presbyterial Church Government
http://www.covenanter.org/Westminster/formofpresbygov.htm

See also: Selection of covenant heads for positions of leadership, Sexual relationship, Bad relationships as a cause of disease and death



The Directory for Family Worship

Family reformation is the easiest and the most likely way to a common reformation; at least to send many souls to heaven and train up multitudes for God, if it reach not to national reformation. -- Richard Baxter

Family worship was also, to the Puritans, vitally important. Every home should be a church, with the head of the house as its minister. Daily and indeed twice daily, the Puritans recommended, the family as a family should hear the word read, and pray to God. Sunday by Sunday, the family should seek to pool the profiting of its members from the public ordinances; day by day, its members should seek to encourage each other in the way of God. Parents must teach their children the Scriptures; all members of the household must be given time and a place to pray. Thus, informally, but conscientiously, the worship and service of God in the home must be carried on. -- J.I. Packer


*ALEXANDER, JAMES W.,
Family Worship: A Biblical Duty, 1847. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #22, ISBN: 0921148143 9780921148142. Alternate title: Thoughts on Family Worship (Morgan, PA: Soli Deo Gloria Publications, 1990, 1847). ISBN: 1573580813 9781573580816
First printed in 1847 by the Presbyterian Board of Education.
"No minister in our church was a more accomplished scholar. The pulpit was his appropriate sphere." -- Charles Hodge
"It would be almost impossible to overemphasis the importance of daily family worship. It is a blessed privilege for those who have known it as children and/or adults. It is foundational to any lasting revival or reformation. It is a duty commanded by God in Scripture, and to neglect it is, without a doubt, sinful. The Westminster Divines made it clear, in their amazing Directory for Family Worship, that obstinacy in the sin of neglecting family worship should lead where there are faithful elders to the head of the offending house being `suspended and debarred from the Lord's supper.' This book gives the nature, warrant, and history of family worship in easy to read large print." -- SWRB
"The author's goal is `extending the domestic worship of God's people and especially in arousing the children of the covenant to honor the God of their fathers.' To fulfill this purpose, Alexander traces family worship from Eden on through the Old and New Testaments and church history. The universal voice of the Church, in its best periods, has been in favor of family worship. . . .' He demonstrates that family worship is a means of intellectual improvement: `True piety improves the understanding. . . .' " -- Robert H. Duvall

*Book of Psalms for Singing (Edmonton, AB Canada: Still Waters Revival Books).
Matches all the audio cassettes and CD's of Psalm singing found in the Still Waters Revival Books catalog. Great for family worship and one of the best ways to memorize God's Word.

*Henry, Matthew, A Church in the House: A Sermon Concerning Family Religion (London, 1704), (Cerlox Bound Photocopies of Rare Books Series. Edmonton, Alberta, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books).
"Family worship is presently one of the most powerful weapons in a Christian parents arsenal of truth. Read this Puritan sermon and see why! In time past, when the churches saw the family as `little churches' within the church, elders saw to it that family worship was practiced daily and that offenders against this Godly order were censured. Daily family worship is a monumental blessing on the one hand and a serious sin of omission, when not practiced, on the other. Though Kevin Reed was speaking of public worship in the following quotation, the directive can easily be applied to family worship also. Reed notes, `[h]eads of households you husbands and fathers -- it is incumbent on you to lead your family in the narrow path which leads to life. Compromise in worship is a form of apostasy, which teaches children that we love family approval more than obedience to Christ... You have no right to set aside biblical principles of worship' (John Knox the Forgotten Reformer, forthcoming, p. 99). Furthermore, Ptacek has written that, `[t]he role of the head of the family was given the highest possible status by Matthew Henry. In a 1704 sermon on family religion, Henry followed Cawdrey in arguing that the head of the family holds all of the offices of Christ with respect to his household: prophet, priest and king. Henry's design for family religion is based on the exercise of these three offices. As a prophet the head of the family teaches doctrine through the reading of Scripture and catechizing. The head's priestly office is expressed in praying for his family. His exercise of discipline reflects the office of king, both in encouraging godly behaviour and discouraging sinful practices. Although Matthew Henry was the best known Puritan preacher of his time, he asserted without fear of controversy that his view of the role of the head of the family was one in which all agree' (Family Worship, pp. 52-53). For parents, and especially fathers, this may be one of the most important works you will ever read. When family worship is practised faithfully (and the responsibility for this rests with the head of the house primarily, and the elders of the church secondarily -- through encouragement, help and discipline of the unfaithful), nations and generations to come will be greatly influenced to bow humbly before the Lord Jesus Christ and serve Him alone!" -- SWRB

*WESTMINSTER DIVINES and OTHER PURITANS (Gouge, Gataker, et al.), The Westminster Annotations and Commentary on the Whole Bible, 6 volumes, (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books, 1998, 1657). Additional Title: Annotations Upon all the Books of the Old and New Testament: This Third, above the First and Second, Edition so enlarged, As they make an entire Commentary on the Sacred Scriptures: The like never before published in English. Wherein the Text is Explained, Doubts Resolved, Scripture Parallel'd, and Various Readings observed; By the Labour of certain Learned Divines thereunto appointed, and therein employed, As is expressed in the Preface, 1657, EEBO.

*Westminster Assembly (1643-1652), The Westminster Confession of Faith (Glasgow, Scotland [Free Presbyterian Publications, 133 Woodlands Road, Glasgow G3 6LE]: Free Presbyterian Publication, 1994). ISBN 0902506080 (casebound) and ISBN 0902506358 (paperback), Still Waters Revival Books, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Also available from Crown and Covenant Publications:
http://www.crownandcovenant.com/product_p/ds115.htm
" 'The product of Puritan conflict,' stated Shedd, reaching 'a perfection of statement never elsewhere achieved.' All that learning the most profound and extensive, intellect the most acute and searching, and piety the most sincere and earnest, could accomplish, was thus concentrated in the Westminster Assembly's Confession of Faith, which may be safely termed the most perfect statement of Systematic Theology ever framed by the Christian Church,' writes Hetherington (The History of the Westminster Assembly of Divines), p. 345. Concerning the Shorter Catechism, which is one of the items also included in this book, Mitchell notes: 'it is a thoroughly Calvinistic and Puritan catechism, the ripest fruit of the Assembly's thought and experience, maturing and finally fixing the definitions of theological terms to which Puritanism for half a century had been leading up and gradually coming closer and closer to in its legion of catechisms' (Westminster Assembly: Its History and Standards, p. 431). The Westminster Confession of Faith is the greatest of all the creeds of the Christian church. The church of Christ cannot be creedless and live. Especially in an age of doubt and confusion, it is her duty to define and proclaim the one true faith. Nowhere has the Reformed church done this so effectively as in the Westminster Confession and family of documents. This book represents Reformed thinking at its purest and best. It was intended, as part of the Covenanted Reformation taking place during its compilation, to be adopted as the binding confessional standard for every individual, family, court, church, and legislature in the British Isles." -- SWRB
This is considered to be the definitive publication of the Westminster family of documents. It includes the following:

  1. To the Christian Reader, Especially Heads of Families, Mr. Thomas Manton's Epistle to the Reader,
  2. The Confession of Faith (1646), the full and original edition with Scripture proofs written out,
  3. The Larger Catechism with Scripture proofs written out,
  4. The Shorter Catechism with Scripture proofs written out,
  5. The Sum of Saving Knowledge,
  6. The National Covenant,
  7. The Solemn League and Covenant,
  8. A Solemn Acknowledgement of Publick Sins and Breaches of the Covenant; and a Solemn Engagement to all the Duties Contained Therein
    CD #1, Reformation Bookshelf 30 CD Set
    http://www.swrb.com/Puritan/reformation-bookshelf-CDs.htm
  9. The Directory for the Public Worship of God,
  10. The Form of Presbyterial Church Government, and
  11. The Directory for Family Worship.
The Westminster Confession of Faith is said to be the finest summary of The Holy Bible available. It is recommended for daily devotions. Among the ten greatest works in the English language.
"The Westminster Confession of Faith (The Westminster Standards) and Related Works: A Study Guide"
http://www.lettermen2.com/suggest.html
For commentaries see the following topical listing:
"The Westminster Confession of Faith (The Westminster Standards) and Related Works"
http://www.lettermen2.com/bcrr9cha.html#wcf
Westminster Larger Catechism With Proof Texts
http://www.reformed.org/documents/wlc_w_proofs/WLC_frames.html
Westminster Confession of Faith With Scripture Proofs
http://www.reformed.org/documents/wcf_with_proofs/
Scripture Index to the Westminster Standards (The complete Scripture index to the Westminster Confession, Larger and Shorter Catechisms.)
http://www.swrb.com/newslett/actualnls/index01.htm
Bordwine, James, A Guide to the Westminster Standards: Confession of Faith and Larger Catechism (Unicoi, TN: (The Trinity Foundation, 1996).
Includes a unique, 100-page topical index to both the Confession and the Catechism.
The Westminster Confession of Faith (1646) with all its subordinate documents in searchable format are found on CD #1 of the Reformation Bookshelf 30 CD Set
http://www.swrb.com/Puritan/reformation-bookshelf-CDs.htm.
Westminster Assembly and Related Documents
http://www.covenanter.org/Westminster/westminsterhome.htm
The Significance of The Westminster Standards as a Creed
http://www.fpcr.org/blue_banner_articles/signific.htm
Heresies Defined and the Necessity of Heresies Explained, by George Gillespie, Scottish Commissioner to the Assembly of Divines at Westminster
http://www.truecovenanter.com/gillespie/ggilles09.html
The Shorter Catechism With Scripture Proofs (Carlisle, PA [P.O. Box 621, Carlisle 17013, USA]: The Banner of Truth Trust).
Arguably the greatest tract ever created, all factors considered.
http://www.reformed.org/documents/WSC_frames.html
Westminster Shorter Catechism Project
"Click on any of the individual questions below to get the answer and Biblical references, as well as links to works by John Flavel, Thomas Watson, Thomas Boston, James Fisher, and John Whitecross, and others."
http://www.shortercatechism.com/

*Westminster Assembly of Divines, The Directory for Family Worship, 1647 and The Directory for the Publick Worship of God, 1645 (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books).
"It doesn't get any better than this! These are the documents approved by the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland in her purest days. Reproduced in large print for easy reading. The Directory for Family Worship lays out the Biblical path to piety and uniformity in secret and private (family) worship, for godly edification. The Directory for Public Worship aimed at fulfilling the Reformation goals of covenanted uniformity in religion between the churches of Christ in the kingdoms of Scotland, England and Ireland. 'Behind its production lay extensive discussion of the proper application of the Puritan regulative principle reducing elements of acceptable worship to what is prescribed or necessarily deducible from Scripture alone. . . . It contains perhaps the finest brief description of expository preaching to be found in the English language' (Cameron, editor, DICTIONARY OF SCOTTISH CHURCH HISTORY AND THEOLOGY, p. 864). During the days of the Second Reformation Gillespie notes that '(t)he parliament hath also, by their ordinance dated the 23d of August 1645, imposed the Directory of Worship under certain mulcts and penalties to be inflicted upon such as do not observe it, or preach or write against it' ('Miscellany Questions' in Gillespie's Works, p. 87). Oh, for the days of comprehensive, full-orbed, God honoring Reformation like that again! An indispensable document for those who are Presbyterian's. However, it can also be very helpful to all those who seek to worship the LORD in spirit and in truth, regardless of denominational affiliation. These two fine historic documents have yet to be equalled in terms of the intent and purpose for which they were originally produced." -- SWRB
WESTMINSTER ASSEMBLY, Form of Presbyterian Church Government
http://www.covenanter.org/Westminster/formofpresbygov.htm

See also: Selection of covenant heads for positions of leadership, Family worship



The Covenanted Reformation of Scotland

The Covenanted Reformation of 17th century Scotland was the highest attainment of Christianity in history. It emphasized the following:
1. Reformation of the church -- reformation of the church must precede reformation of society,
2. Regulative principle of worship -- worship must be according to Scripture and reform is not possible without regulative principle of worship,
3. The preservation of true religion, corporate sanctification, and corporate faithfulness brought about by the ordnance of social covenanting. The well-being and progress of the individual Christian life is interdependent upon corporate sanctification. Conversely, absence of corporate sanctification limits the progress of the individual Christian.

"The Reformation in Scotland was certainly very complete -- in no other country in the world was it so complete... Though Scotland presents but a narrow field, yet the ecclesiastical element has there had a fuller and freer development than in any other country."
In the Church of Scotland we can discern "the blessings which flow from a pure creed and simple worship...." -- John Cunningham

John Cunningham acknowledges that the true church is "bound by the obligations of the Church of God in past times" and is still obligated to pay that it has vowed to the Lord in those magnificent attainments of the Second Reformation (the epitome of these attainments being embodied in the Solemn League and Covenant and the Westminster Standards)."

Social covenanting enabled "Protestant union throughout Christendom...in order to purify, strengthen, and unite all true Christian churches, so that with combined energy and zeal they might go forth, in glad compliance with the Redeemer's commands, teaching all nations, and preacing the everlasting gospel to every creature under heaven." -- William Hetherington

When corporate faithfulness and corporate sanctification are established by social covenanting, then righteousness flourishes and the individual's Christian life progresses under the positive sanctions of God. Indeed this is the state we should strive for in preparation for the Second Comming of Christ.

Freemasonry is the largest and most widely established fraternal order in the world. The masons' guilds were originally restricted to stonecutters, but with the completion of the building of the cathedrals in the 17th century, and especially in England during the Reformation, they admitted as members men of wealth or social status. The guilds thus became societies devoted to general ideals, such as fraternity, equality, and peace, and their meetings became social rather than business occasions. Four or more such guilds, called lodges, united in London on June 24, 1717, to form a grand lodge for London and Westminster, which, within six years, became the Grand Lodge of England. This body is the mother grand lodge of Freemasons in the world, and from it all recognized grand lodges have been derived. The Grand Lodge of All England was formed at York in 1725, that of Ireland at least by June of the same year, and of Scotland, in 1736. The York body came under the jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge at London later in the century.
As a result of the patronage of the order by members of the nobility, the rising British mercantile class looked upon Freemasonry as an adjunct to social success, and the order became popular. The Masonic ideals of religious toleration and the basic equality of all people were in keeping with the growing spirit of liberalism during the 18th century. One of the basic tenets of the Masonic orders throughout the English-speaking world has been that religion is the concern solely of the individual. -- ENCARTA MULTIMEDIA ENCYCLOPEDIA


Anonymous, A List of the Banished and Enslaved Presbyterian Christians, A.D. 1678-1688, for the Cause of the Reformation as Attained in the British Isles, A.D. 1638-1650.
http://members.aol.com/Puritanone/banished.html

ASSOCIATE SYNOD OF SCOTLAND, A Solemn Warning... Wherein the Great Sin, Danger, and Duty of the Present Generation in these Lands, Are Pointed Out and Declared (1758) (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books).
"A stinging rebuke against personal, ecclesiastical and national sins; with the intent to turn the readers of this title from these sins and thus avoid God's wrath: for `the LORD is the true God, he is the living God, and an everlasting king: at his wrath the earth shall tremble, and the nations shall not be able to abide his indignation' (Jer. 10:10) 64 pages." -- SWRB

Baillie, Robert, The Canterburians Self-Conviction: or an evident demonstration of the avowed Arminianisme, Poperie, and tyrannie of that faction, by their owne confessions. . . . , 1641 (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books).
"Baillie was one of the Scottish commissioners to the Westminster Assembly. An exceedingly rare item, this book was written as the storms of the religious wars between the Puritans and the Prelates were beginning to blow. These were days when nations adopted overtly religious presuppositions and books such as this became international defences of gospel principles against the ecclesiastical (and political) forces of Antichrist -- and his generation of vipers. After rehearsing some of the major incidents of Prelatical persecution against the saints of the most high God, and calling to the English for support of the Covenanted cause of Christ, Baillie gives this stirring summary of his motives in writing this book, 'behold I here first upon all hazard do break my pitcher, do hold out my Lamp, and blow my trumpet before the Commissioners of the whole Kingdom, offering to convince that prevalent faction by their own mouth, of Arminianism, Popery, and Tyranny.' These were brave and zealous words, for in that day such speech could eventuate in your death. This is not only a historically relevant item, but also a fine defense against the prevailing heresies of the flesh (heresy being a work of the flesh, cf. Gal 5:19-20). The two predominant heresies addressed by Baillie in this book still cover much of the professing Christian world today; these being: (1.) false, man-centered views of salvation (Arminianism and Pelagianism) and (2.) false man-centered views of worship (Liturgical innovationism: either high church or Charismatic). 'Baillie fought hard against Arminianism' noted Johnston, TREASURY OF THE SCOTTISH COVENANT, p. 310); making this book especially valuable for today! This is the third edition of 128 pages plus a 28 page postscript.

BAILLIE, ROBERT (David Laing, editor), Letters and Journals of Robert Baillie, 3 volumes, 1841 edition. Included in (Reformation Bookshelf CD #17). A Christian classic.
"Baillie was one of the Scottish delegates to the Westminster Assembly and these volumes cover the period from 1637 to 1662 -- some of the most momentous days in the history of the Reformed faith. These letters contain an intimate insider's look at these days of international religious drama, national covenants, and the writing of the greatest religious Confession ever given to men, the Westminster Confession of Faith. A major source for 17th century Church history and a totally unique compilation -- peering into the very heart of Reformation!" -- SWRB
Volume one only of above.
"Contains Baillie's letters and journal entries covering the period from 1637 to 1641. The appendix includes "Original Letters and Papers, Chiefly Relating to Ecclesiastical Affairs in Scotland, 1633 to 1639."
Volume two only of above.
"Contains letters covering the period from 1642 to 1646. The appendix includes 'Original Letters and Papers, Chiefly Relating to Ecclesiastical Affairs in Scotland, 1639 to 1646.'
Volume three only of above.
"Contains letters covering the period from 1647 to 1662. The appendix includes 'Original Letters and Papers, Chiefly Relating to Ecclesiastical Affairs in Scotland, 1647 to 1661.' This volume also includes a glossary, an index of names and the memoir of the life and writings of Robert Baillie. Of special note are pages 525-557, which contain 'Notices Regarding the Metrical Version of the Psalms Received By the Church of Scotland,' where we see the historical validity of the Reformed practice of exclusive Psalmody, from the place occupied by the Psalter printed in Geneva in 1556, right up to the 'Psalter debates' that took place during Westminster Assembly." -- SWRB

*BAILLIE, ROBERT (David Laing, editor), Letters and Journals of Robert Baillie, 3 volumes, 1841 edition. Included in (Reformation Bookshelf CD #17). A Christian classic.
"Baillie was one of the Scottish delegates to the Westminster Assembly and these volumes cover the period from 1637 to 1662 -- some of the most momentous days in the history of the Reformed faith. These letters contain an intimate insider's look at these days of international religious drama, national covenants, and the writing of the greatest religious Confession ever given to men, the Westminster Confession of Faith. A major source for 17th century Church history and a totally unique compilation -- peering into the very heart of Reformation!" -- SWRB
Volume one only of above.
"Contains Baillie's letters and journal entries covering the period from 1637 to 1641. The appendix includes "Original Letters and Papers, Chiefly Relating to Ecclesiastical Affairs in Scotland, 1633 to 1639."
Volume two only of above.
"Contains letters covering the period from 1642 to 1646. The appendix includes 'Original Letters and Papers, Chiefly Relating to Ecclesiastical Affairs in Scotland, 1639 to 1646.'
Volume three only of above.
"Contains letters covering the period from 1647 to 1662. The appendix includes 'Original Letters and Papers, Chiefly Relating to Ecclesiastical Affairs in Scotland, 1647 to 1661.' This volume also includes a glossary, an index of names and the memoir of the life and writings of Robert Baillie. Of special note are pages 525-557, which contain 'Notices Regarding the Metrical Version of the Psalms Received By the Church of Scotland,' where we see the historical validity of the Reformed practice of exclusive Psalmody, from the place occupied by the Psalter printed in Geneva in 1556, right up to the 'Psalter debates' that took place during Westminster Assembly." -- SWRB

*Brown, John (of Wamphray), An Exposition of the Epistle of Paul to the Romans, With Large Practical Observations; Delivered in Several Lectures, 1766 edition (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books).
"This commentary has been called, 'perhaps the best exposition of the Epistle yet to be found' (J.W.C., cited in Johnston, TREASURY OF THE SCOTTISH COVENANT, p. 341). Charles Spurgeon comments, 'By a Calvinist of the old school. Heavy, perhaps, but precious.' At the very least it should be considered a classic Covenanter's commentary. John Brown of Wamphray was one of Samuel Rutherford's favorite students. He was ejected in 1662, imprisoned and cruelly treated until he suffered exile to the Netherlands -- all for steadfastly maintaining the principles of the Covenanted Reformation. In fact, A.N. in the preface to this volume notes that, among other things, 'the particular grounds and causes why he was thus inhumanly and barbarously treated, was his strict attachment to, and maintaining the binding force and perpetual obligations of the nation's solemn vows and covenants; his refusing acceptation of the then sinful Indulgences; ... his public and zealous testifying against licentious tolerations,' etc. While in exile he wrote thirteen books. Johnston, TREASURY OF THE SCOTTISH COVENANT, p. 339), notes that Brown 'has been regarded the most important theologian of the second period of Scottish Presbyterianism.' This commentary gives us a good indication as to why Brown is so highly regarded among faithful Calvinists, godly historians and numerous commentators. 614 pages." -- SWRB

Brown, P. Hume, John Knox: A Biography (1895), 2 volumes (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books).
"Brown says of Knox, 'It would, indeed, be difficult to name another historical personage who in such degree as Knox revealed a nation's genius to itself, and at once vitalized and dominated its collective thought and action. To Present Knox in this twofold aspect, at once as a great Scotsman, and a figure of European importance, is the object of the present biography.' Moreover, Brown continues, noting that in Knox 'we have precisely what distinguishes the great religious leader from the mere religious visionary' and we 'have seen in Knox one of the great emancipators of humanity, whose work left undone would irremediably have injured the highest interests not only of his own country but of the community of civilized nations... For the mass of his countrymen, those who have shaped the nation's destinies in the past as they must shape them in the future, Knox is the greatest person their country has produced, and the man to whom in all that makes a people great they owe the deepest and most abiding debt. 'What I have been to my country,' he himself said when within sight of the end he looked back on the long travail of his life, 'what I have been to my country, albeit this unthankful age will not know, yet the ages to come will be compelled to bear witness to the truth;' and the consenting testimony of three centuries is the evidence and pledge that his assurance was not in vain.' An rare and extensive biography of over 700 pages. . . ." -- SWRB

Crookshank, William. The history of the state and sufferings of the Church of Scotland, from the Restoration to the Revolution. With an introduction, ... By William Crookshank, ... In two volumes. ... Vol. 1. London, 1749. 2 vols. (ECCO) Gale Document Number CW421448269
"William Crookshank (1712-1769), Scottish Presbyterian minister of a church in London. 'Crookshank is notable for his translation of Herman Witsius' classic work of federal theology, THE OECONOMY OF THE COVENANTS, and for producing an abridgement of Robert Wodrow's History entitled THE HISTORY OF THE STATE AND SUFFERINGS OF THE CHURCH OF SCOTLAND, 2 vols 1749'." - Dictionary of Scottish Church History and Theology.
"This volume begins in 1679 just before the rising at Bothwell and ends in 1688 with the execution of Mr. James Renwick and the 'glorious revolution'."

Seaman, Lazarus, d. 1675, The Second and last collection of the late London ministers farewel sermons preached by Dr. Seaman, Dr. Bates, Mr. Caryll, [brace] Mr. Brooks, Mr. Venning, and Mr. Mead ; to which is added a farewell sermon preached at Dedham in Essex by Mr. Matthew Newcomen ; as also Mr. Lyes sermon at the conclusion of the last morning-exercise at All-hallows in Lumbard-street, being a summary rehearsal of the whole monthly-lectures, 1663, EEBO.

*Church of Scotland. General Assembly. Commission, and Ker, A., Good counsell come from Scotland: or, A solemn and seasonable vvarning to all estates and degrees of persons throughout the land: for holding fast the League & Covenant with England, and avoyding every thing that may prove a snare and tentation to the breach thereof: by the Commissioners of the Generall Assembly. Edinb. 19. Decemb. 1646. The Commission of the General Assembly ordains this warning to be forthwith printed, and that thereafter it be sent to Presbyteries; requiring them, immediately after the receipt thereof, to cause every minister of their number read the same distinctly, and explain it to their people upon a Sabbath day in their severall kirks, and that they report accompt of their diligence with the first conveniencie: appointing in the mean time, that to morrow the same be read in all the kirks of this city. A. Ker, 1646, EEBO.

*CAMERON, NIGEL (editor) Dictionary of Scottish Church History and Theology (Edinburg, Scotland: T & T Clark, 1993).

*Covenanted General Assembly of the Church of Scotland (Alexander Peterkin, editor, Records of the Kirk of Scotland, Containing the Acts and Proceedings of the Generals Assemblies, From the Year 1638 Downwards, As Authenticated by the Clerks of Assembly; With Notes and Historical Illustrations, by Alexander Peterkin (1838 edition) (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books, 1997).
" 'The object of the present work is to present to the public, in a form that may be generally accessible, the history of one of the most interesting periods in the annals of our National Church, by the republication of the Acts and Proceedings, at and subsequent to the era of her Second Reformation; and, combined therewith, such historical documents and sketches as are calculated to preserve the memory of an important, and, ultimately beneficial revolution,, notes Peterkin in his introduction. This is one the most valuable publications we offer related to Second Reformation history and the many important questions that were debated (and oftentimes settled) during this watershed period -- before, during and after the sitting of the Westminster Assembly. It also contains some indispensable information on the Protester/Resolutioner controversy (which reveals many valuable lessons for Reformed Christians today), including excerpts from some lost books and papers written by the Protesting Covenanters. The excerpts from James Guthrie's The Waters of Sihor, or the Lands Defectione, in which Guthrie enumerates the errors of the Resolutioners, as well as the marks of malignancy, is one prime example. Other rare Protester documents (inveighing against the 'pretended Assemblies' of the Resolutioners), signed by the likes of Samuel Rutherford and Robert Traill are also included. Very rare and very valuable -- a gold mine for the serious student of the Second Reformation! 684 pages." -- SWRB

*Cunningham, William, The Scottish Reformation, Ter-Centenary of (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books, 1997).
" 'Contains papers read at this commemoration in August of 1860 by Cunningham, Begg, Symington, Hetherington, M'Crie, Wylie, Binnie and others. Notes that 'Next to the advent of our blessed Saviour, the Reformation from Popery is the most remarkable and glorious event recorded in modern history.' Shows how the Reformation affected every area of life in Scotland." -- SWRB

*Durham, James, The Law Unsealed; or, a Practical Exposition of the Ten Commandments. With a Resolution of Several Momentous Questions and Cases of Conscience (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books, 1802 edition, 1675), EEBO.
"Durham, a Scottish Covenanter, was known as a 'very candid and searching preacher,' who in an instant was 'in the inmost corners of your bosom,' though with the utmost 'caution and meekness, without giving any of his hearers the smallest ground to fret and repine at his freedom in dealing with them'" (Carstairs cited in the DICTIONARY OF SCOTTISH CHURCH HISTORY AND THEOLOGY, p. 266). John Owen, in his letter introducing the reader to this volume, writes, 'In the whole a full testimony is given, not only against the profligate lives of many, called Christians, but that barren careless profession also, which too many satisfy themselves withal, who pretend more unto the truth and power of religion. And as those who are sincere in their obedience may, in the examination of themselves, by the rules here laid down, discern the decays which possibly they have fallen under in this hour of temptation, which is come on the face of the earth, to try them that dwell therein, so also may they be directed in their Christian course unto the glory of God, and the comfort of their own souls.' Durham's lectures deal with each commandment in order and the volume contains 'An Alphabetical Table of the Principal Matters Handled in the Whole Book;' making it eminently practical, and a very useful aid to the study of God's holy, just, good and spiritual law (Rom. 7:12). 422 pages." -- SWRB

*Gilmour, Robert, Samuel Rutherford A biographical and historical study in the history of the Scottish Covenant (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books, 1997).
"In CRITICAL REVIEWS RELATING CHIEFLY TO SCOTLAND (also in this bound photocopy section), compiled by Hay Fleming, we read, 'Mr. Gilmour has produced an excellent volume, which is worthy of being placed alongside any of its predecessors . . . Scattered throughout its pages there are numerous quotations from Rutherford's own works . . . Rutherford's admirers will relish it, because of its keen sympathy with and high appreciation of him.' Rutherurd was a master scholar of Scripture, a great devotional writer (see his Letters), a devoted minister of Christ, one of the Scotch commissioners to the Westminster Assembly, and a world class political philosopher (whose LEX, REX forever changed the face of political thought). Gilmour writes, 'that, as regards religious fervour, scholastic subtlety of intellect, and intensity of ecclesiastical conviction, Samuel Rutherford is the most distinctively representative Scotsman in the first half of the seventeenth century.' Few saints in history were given the gifts this man possessed. (See under 'Rutherford,' in our 'rare bound photocopy sections' for a number of his works that have been out of print for many years.)" -- SWRB

Hall, David W. (editor) The Practice of Confessional Subscription
"David W. Hall is the author or editor of SAVIOR OR SERVANT? PUTTING GOVERNMENT IN ITS PLACE, THE ARROGANCE OF THE MODERN, PARADIGMS IN POLITY, ELECTION DAY SERMONS, and 10 other volumes." -- Publisher's Annotation
Table of Contents
http://capo.org/opeds/PCSTOC.html

Hay Fleming, David, Critical Reviews Relating Chiefly to Scotland (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books, 1997).
"Fascinating short reviews, in a book of over 600 pages, covering numerous books dealing with Scotland's Reformation and Reformers. Over eleven books on John Knox alone are dealt with. Other figures covered include Cromwell, the Covenanters, Samuel Rutherford, the Westminster Assembly and many others -- including lesser known, but none the less important and inspiring 'men of of the covenant.' Topics range from Scottish Presbyterian worship, the Camerionians and Mary Queen of Scots to the politics and religion of a reforming Scotland. A number of the books contained in this section of our catalogue are critically reviewed." -- SWRB

Hay Fleming, David, The Scottish Reformation (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books).
"In preparing this little handbook I have tried, above all things,' states the author, 'to be clear, brief, fair, and accurate. Although the authorities are not cited, it has been almost entirely drawn from state papers, official records, the works of those who took part in the struggle, and from other contemporary sources.' A good, short (112 pages), easy-reading introduction to the first Reformation in Scotland, Knox being one of the principle players during this period." -- SWRB

*Henderson, Alexander, Sermons, Prayers, and Pulpit Addresses (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books).
"Henderson lived 1583-1646, and was one of the Scottish commissioners to the Westminster Assembly. Baillie called Henderson 'the fairest ornament, after John Knox, of incomparable memory, that ever the Church of Scotland did enjoy'." -- SWRB

*Henderson, Alexander, Obedience is Better than Sacrifice (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books). An audio cassette.
"Read by Elder Lyndon Dohms from the book Sermons, Prayers and Pulpit Addresses. Henderson was one of the Scottish commissioners to the Westminster Assembly and the principal architect of the Solemn League and Covenant. Some consider him as only second to Knox in regard to his work as a Scottish Reformer. This sermon, on Psalm 40:6-8, was preached in Scotland just before Henderson left for the Westminster Assembly and exhorts Christians to zealousness -- especially in days of great declension." -- SWRB

*Hetherington, William, The History of the Westminster Assembly (Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books).
" 'Every person who has directed his attention to the events of the seventeenth century, whether with regard to their civil or their religious aspect, has felt that it was impossible fully to understand either the one or the other line of study, without taking into view the character of the Westminster Assembly, the purpose for which it met, and the result of its deliberations . . . The man who penetrates a little deeper into the nature of those unrevealed but powerful influences which move a nation's mind, and mould its destinies, will be ready to direct his attention more profoundly to the objects and deliberations of an assembly which met at a moment so critical, and was composed of the great master-minds of the age; and the theologian who has learned to view religion as the vital principle of human nature, equally in nations and in the individual man, will not easily admit that weak idea, that such an assembly could have been an isolated event, but will be disposed earnestly to inquire what led to its meeting, and what important consequences followed. And although the subject has not hitherto been investigated with such a view, it may, we trust, be possible to prove, that it was the most important event in the century in which it occurred; and that it has exerted, and in all probability will yet exert, a far more wide and permanent influence upon both the civil and the religious history of mankind than has generally been ever imagined,' writes William Hetherington in this book (SWRB, 1856, 2nd reprint edition, 1993, pp. 16-17, emphasis added). This book is probably the best popular historical account ever published regarding this unsurpassed Assembly. The history leading up to the Assembly is especially important and not only set the context for what became the major debates among the ministers present, but even dictated who was selected to this august body of scholars. These debates and their resolutions have defined and directed Christian thought and culture ever since their original ratification. Hetherington covers the period from 1531 to 1662. Many consider this era a historical high water mark for doctrinal and practical precision. Also included is a chapter on the theological productions of the Westminster Assembly and six valuable appendices (one containing six biographical notices of the Scottish Commissioners -- including Rutherford, Gillespie, Henderson and Baillie)." -- SWRB
History of the Westminster Assembly of Divines, by William Maxwell Hetherington, D. D., LL. D.
http://www.reformed.org/books/hetherington/west_assembly/index.html

*Hetherington, William H., The Independent Controversy, the Westminster Assembly and Cromwell (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books).
"Though Cromwell has been lauded by many in our day, faithful lovers of truth in his day rejected him and the attendant errors of his Independent abettors. Concerning Cromwell and company, the Act, Declaration and Testimony . . . by the Reformed Presbytery (1876 ed.) witnesses to the truth that Presbyterians, 'both refused subjection unto, and testified against the usurpation of Oliver Cromwell and his accomplices (the Independents-RB), his invading the land,' and 'his anti-christian toleration of all sectarian errors and heresies,' which were at that time 'threatening the ruin and destruction of the true religion, as well as liberty.' Cromwell's so-called 'tolerance' extended to the execution of one Presbyterian minister and the persecution of others. He played an instrumental part in scuttling the Christ honoring covenanted uniformity of the Reformed religion that was being fought for in the period covered by this book. The debates, especially between the Independents and the Presbyterians, in this eventful period, are still with us today and have changed very little, if at all. This is a good place to examine the historical context and the theological argumentation that is foundational to these two antagonistic systems.

*Hutchison, Matthew, The Reformed Presbyterian Church in Scotland: Its Origin and History, 1680-1876 (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books).
"This is the only book-length history covering the period after 1680 (to 1876), when the majority Synod of the Reformed Presbyterian Church of Scotland merged with the Free Church of Scotland. The history after 1822, when the Auchensaugh Renovation was removed as a term of communion, merely chronicles the wholesale backsliding of the church and eventual split in 1863; from which a majority emerged which joined with the Free Church of Scotland in 1876. A remnant of the minority of the Reformed Presbyterian Church of Scotland still exists, however they never returned to the original position of the church from which it began to depart in 1822 (with the removal of the Auchensaugh bond -- which bond is the Auchensaugh Renovation listed under the Reformed Presbytery in this catalogue). This book is a fine illustration of the 'footsteps of the flock,' (as seen in the Protesters [paleopresbyterians] and their spiritual posterity), during the period of which it deals, while at the same time serving as a clear warning to those who have declined from Reformation attainments (i.e. the Resolutioners [neopresbyterians] and those who continue their deformation of the faith). 'By the National Covenant,' notes Thomas Sproull, 'our Fathers laid Popery prostrate. By the Solemn League and Covenant they were successful in resisting prelatic encroachments and civil tyranny. By it they were enabled to achieve the Second Reformation... They were setting up landmarks by which the location and limits of the city of God will be known at the dawn of the millennial day... How can they be said to go forth by the footsteps of the flock, who have declined from the attainments, renounced the covenants and contradicted the testimony of 'the cloud of witnesses.'... All the schisms (separations) that disfigure the body mystical of Christ... are the legitimate consequences of the abandonment of reformation attainments -- the violation of covenant engagements.' Understanding where the faithful covenanted servants of Christ have been historically, not only helps individuals to separate between truly constituted churches and the those that are false (because they have constitutionally backslidden from Reformation attainments); but is a necessary component to the keeping the fifth commandment, as the Reformed Presbytery has pointed out: ' Nor otherwise can a Christian know the time or place of his birth, or the persons whom God commands him to honor as his father and mother, than by uninspired testimony; and the same is true of his covenant obligation, if baptized in infancy. Against all who ignorantly or recklessly reject or oppose history as a bond of fellowship, in the family, in the state, but especially in the church, we thus enter our solemn and uncompromising protest' (Excerpted from: The Act, Declaration and Testimony for the Whole of Our Covenanted Reformation... by the Reformed Presbytery, pp. 177-178 -- a SWRB rare bound photocopy [1761], reprinted 1995 from the 1876 edition). This edition of The Reformed Presbyterian Church in Scotland: Its Origin and History, 1680-1876 also contains an introductory note by William Goold (the editor of John Owen's Works). In introducing this book Goold writes, 'This volume may claim attention as supplying an essential link in the ecclesiastical history of Scotland. It is the history of that body of men who adhered to the civil part of the Second Reformation, according to which Presbytery was established and recognized by the State between 1638 and 1649... The Church of which this volume is a history took its rise in its distinctive character at this period, and on the ground that it could not, while acknowledging the relief from oppression which the Revolution (of 1688) afforded, acquiesce in the arrangements made by the State for the recognition of the Church and the due exercise of its authority within its own spiritual domain (because the so-called 'glorious revolution' was Erastian to the core and also denied the previous national covenant engagements -- RB).... Apart, however, from their testimony in regard to this evil and danger, resulting from a Civil Government in which Prelacy was continued as an essential element, those who dissented from the Revolution Settlement, and from whom the Reformed Presbyterian Church arose, were animated with an earnest zeal for the maintenance of religious ordinances. They strove to exist as a Church, and how far they succeeded, and what difficulties they had to surmount in the attempt, is the interesting story recorded in this volume' (pp. v-vi). In summary, this book (of 450 pages) is an one-of-a-kind chronicle of an integral part of the history of the battle for the 'Crown Rights and Royal Prerogatives of the Lord Jesus Christ'." -- SWRB

*Johnston (of Wariston), Archibald, Diary of Sir Archibald Johnston of Wariston, 3 volumes (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books, 1997).
"The introduction to this book cites Carlyle writing, 'Archibald Johnston of Wariston; . . . a Lord Register of whom all the world had heard. Redactor of the Covenanters' protests in 1637 and onwards; redactor perhaps of the Covenant itself; canny lynx-eyed Lawyer, and austere Presbyterian Zealot; full of fire, of heavy energy and gloom: in fact a very notable character.' The introduction further notes that Johnston was 'in some respects, one of the most interesting of the leading Scotsmen who lived in those troubled times which began with the Service Book riot, the swearing and subscription of the National Covenant, and the abjuration of Episcopacy in 1637-38, and ended with the overthrow of the Protectorate and the Restoration of the Monarchy in 1660 . . .' Calling Johnston the 'Covenanter politician,' the DICTIONARY OF SCOTTISH CHURCH HISTORY AND THEOLOGY, (Cameron, editor) states, 'From the start of the revolt against Charles I in 1637 he was at its centre, frequently acting as secretary to the rebel leaders and drafting their declarations. He and Alexander Henderson were joint authors of the National Covenant, and he frequently took part in negotiations with the King and the English Parliament in the years that followed. In 1638 he was appointed clerk to the General Assembly and procurator of the Church, and in 1641, he was knighted and appointed a Lord of Session. In 1643 he became one of Scotland's representatives at the Westminster Assembly, and in 1646 King's Advocate. He had from the start been identified with the most radical of the Covenanters, and in 1648 he helped inspire opposition to the Engagement. A leading figure in the Kirk Party regime of 1648-50, becoming Clerk Register in 1649, he was in the fore in demanding thorough purging and punishing of the ungodly in both Church and state. During the Cromwellian invasion of 1650-1 he supported the Western Remonstrance and the Protesters in virtually disowning the cause of Charles II. He refused to serve the regime of Oliver Cromwell at first, partly through opposition of the religious toleration it imposed (though he later backslid into accepting major positions under Cromwell's dictatorship -- RB) . . . After the Restoration he was denounced as a traitor for having served Cromwell, and fled into hiding abroad. He was discovered in France, brought back to Edinburgh and executed . . . being generally hated and despised. Yet through his remarkable diaries one can gain much understanding' (pp. 446-447). Johnston, TREASURY OF THE SCOTTISH COVENANT (pp. 404-405) provides us with more insight into this fascinating saint (and these unparalleled times) in the following two quotations. 'For the lay elders there was the redoubted Johnston of Warriston, the most able and zealous of a group of lay statesmen who were as thorough warriors in the ecclesiastical department of the great struggle as the clergy themselves . . . He looked at the Covenant as the setting of Christ on His throne, and so was out of measure zealous in it. He afterwards, in old age and physical weakness, sealed it with his blood, his last words being 'The Lord has graciously comforted me; O pray, pray; praise, praise' (Burton). 'Warriston was a religious statesman. The standard of his policy was the Word of God; his great and governing aim, the Divine glory. And on this account his name has suffered obloquy from a quarter where all who would follow his steps may expect similar treatment, so long as society is composed, as it still is to such an alarming extent, of the godless and unbelieving' (Dr. M'Crie). The TREASURY OF THE SCOTTISH COVENANT also notes that 'it is to Johnston that the world generally has attributed the project of renewing the Covenant (of 1638 -- RB). This was his master-stroke of policy.' It further informs us that 'on one occasion he continued in prayer during fourteen hours.' For a glimpse into the heart of the most thorough national (and international) Reformation thus far in history you will not get closer to the source than Johnston's rare three volume Diary! From the inner workings of the battle for the National covenant to Johnston's notes covering Cromwell, Owen's views on toleration, the Protester/Resolutioner controversy and much more, this is an exceedingly valuable historical resource. As the introduction so aptly puts it, 'the great Covenanter's Diary . . . contained many valuable passages with relation to the history of these times, nowhere else to be found.' Almost 1300 pages in total and indexed." -- SWRB

*JOHNSTON, JOHN C., Treasury of the Scottish Covenant (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books, 1997). Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #27, ISBN: 0921148240 9780921148241. Available on
The Amazing Christian Library, DVD Five, CD #25, ATLA 1988-6070. A Christian classic.
"A massive listing (over 671 pages) covering Covenanting literature from the period of the Reformation to its publication in 1887. Contains not only the principal literary productions of the Covenanters (in the course of the long-sustained and heroic resistance offered by them to the spiritual despotism thrust against them in both church and state), but all of the chief historical documents connected with this period of history. Inspiration and courage can be drawn from the memories and associations of these events and writings. Here is one example of what you will find (from page 349 in the book): '(Richard) Camerons' head and hands, cut from his body at Airsmoss, were taken to his father, then suffering in prison in Edinburgh for the Covenant. He was asked if he knew them. 'His words,' says Dr. Kerr, 'were surely the most touching of all the memories of that cruel time: 'I know, I know them! they are my son's, my dear son's! It is the Lord: good is the will of the Lord, who cannot wrong me nor mine, but has made goodness and mercy to follow us all our days.' After which, by order of the Council, his head was fixed upon the Netherbow Port, and his hands beside it, with the fingers upward, a kind of preaching 'at the entry of the city, at the coming in at the doors,' that told more for his cause and against the persecutors than all the words he could have spoken.' A must for every serious theological student, religious library, or rare book collector who has any interest in Reformation thought and/or literature. It is a veritable gold mine of information, facts, documents, book listings and more!" -- SWRB

*Kerr, James (editor), The Covenants and the Covenanters: Covenants, Sermons, and Documents of the Covenanted Reformation (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books).
"The Reformed Presbytery (in 1879) has well noted the following incongruity that is still with us today, 'We heard from various quarters the cry, "maintain the truth, stand up for the principles of the Second Reformation:" and yet many of those who are the most loud in uttering this cry, appear desirous to bury in oblivion those imperishable national and ecclesiastical deeds, by which the church and kingdom of Scotland became "married to the Lord",' (A Short Vindication of Our Covenanted Reformation, p. 20). This book should go a long way to remedying the above noted ignorance and hypocrisy among those who now call upon the name of the Lord especially those who claim a Reformation heritage and are still open to further growth as it spells out in no uncertain terms what lay at the heart of the second Reformation. Moreover, these covenants (landmarks of the Lord) stand as beacons to all nations of their continuing moral duty to bind themselves to Christ (first commandment) or suffer His avenging wrath (Ps. 2). And make no mistake about it, the Lord will utterly destroy all those who quarrel with His covenant bonds, whether individuals, churches or nations the mystery of iniquity will fall! The prefatory note to this magnificent volume well describes its value: The Covenants, Sermons, and Papers in this volume carry the readers back to some of the brightest periods in Scottish history. They mark important events in that great struggle by which these three kingdoms (England, Scotland and Ireland - RB) were emancipated from the despotisms of Pope, Prince, and Prelate, and an inheritance of liberty secured for these Islands of the Sea. The whole achievements of the heroes of the battlefields are comprehended under that phrase of Reformers and Martyrs, "The Covenanted Work of Reformation." The attainments of those stirring times were bound together by the Covenants, as by rings of gold. The Sermons here were the product of the ripe thought of the main actors in the various scenes -- men of piety, learning, and renown. Hence, the nature, objects , and benefits of personal and national Covenanting are exhibited in a manner fitted to attract to that ordinance the minds and hearts of men. The readers can well believe the statements of Livingstone, who was present at several ceremonies of covenant-renovation: "I never saw such motions from the Spirit of God. I have seen more than a thousand persons all at once lifting up their hands, and the tears falling down from their eyes." In the presence of the defences of the Covenants as deeds, by these preachers, the baseless aspersions of novelists and theologians fade out into oblivion. True Christians must, as they ponder these productions, be convinced that the Covenanters were men of intepreachers, the baseless aspersions of novelists and theologians fade out into oblivion. True Christians must, as they ponder these productions, be convinced that the Covenanters were men of intense faith and seraphic fervour, and their own hearts will burn as they catch the heavenly flame. Members of the Church of Christ will be stirred to nobler efforts for the Kingdom of their Lord as they meditate on the heroism of those who were the "chariots of Israel and the horsemen thereof;" and they will behold with wonder that 'to the woman were given two wings of And Statesman will discover how princes, parliaments, and peoples united in the hearty surrender of themselves to the Prince of the kings and kingdoms of the earth; and will be aroused to promote that policy of Christian Statesmanship which, illustrating the purpose and will of God, the Father, shall liberate Parliaments and nations from the bonds of false religions, and assert for them those liberties and honours which spring from the enthronement of the Son of man, and King of kings and Lord of lords. This volume of documents of olden times is sent out on a mission of Revival of Religion, personal and national, in the present times. It would do a noble work if it helped to humble classes and masses, and led them to return as one man to that God in covenant from Whom all have gone so far away. A national movement, in penitence and faith, for the repeal of the Acts Recissory and the recognition of the National Covenants would be as life from the dead throughout the British Empire. The people and rulers of these dominions shall yet behold the brilliancy of the Redeemer's crowns; and shall, by universal consent, exalt Him who rules in imperial majesty over the entire universe of God. For, "The seventh angel sounded, and there were great voices in heaven, saying, The kingdoms of this world are become the Kingdoms of our Lord and of His Christ.' Here we have some of the most moving sermons ever addressed to a people and their nations, given before the most solemn of occasions national covenant renewal! Alexander Henderson, Andrew Cant, Joseph Caryl, Edmond Calamy and a host of other Puritan Covenanters (even the turncoat Independent Philip Nye) are included here in easy to read modern (1895) type. Anyone interested in seeing the royal prerogatives of King Jesus once again trumpeted throughout the nations, on a national and international scale, needs this book for these men 'were setting up landmarks by which the city of God will be known at the dawn of the millennial day' (p. 38). 442 pages with illustrations." -- SWRB
The Covenants And The Covenanters
Project Gutenberg free etext online.
http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/19100

*KNOX, JOHN, Against an Anabaptist: In Defense of Predestination Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #19, ISBN: 092114895X 9780921148951. Also availabe as from (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books).
"Curt Daniel calls this 'Knox's major theological work.' Moreover, he states that this is 'more than a short answer (to the Anabaptist -- RB, 468 pages), it is a complete exposition and defense of the Reformed doctrine at the height of the Scottish Reformation' which helped 'guide early Presbyterianism and build the theological bridge between Edinburgh and Geneva.'
"Furthermore, Walker writes: 'Very far from being a mere iconoclast, he (Knox) was also a great teacher of his country men . . . the long and elaborate treatise on Predestination, in which the doctrines of grace and of divine sovereignty are so vigorously, yet upon the whole so wisely, asserted and maintained' (Theology and Theologians of Scotland). This work was much esteemed by Knox's Puritan friends in England and Calderwood, in summing up Knox's character, remarks: 'How profound he was in divinity, that work of his upon Predestination may give evidence' (Laing, editor, p. 17). Furthermore, Laing beautifully sets the context of this work, writing, 'at the period of the Reformation, there prevailed among Christians of all denominations the general belief, that the salvation of man depends on the free grace of God. But they differed on the question, whether the divine decree which has reference to this point is unconditional, or depends on the conduct of man, whether it is general or particular . . . Thus it happened, that Roman Catholics, Arminians, and most of all Socinians endeavoured, in the sense of Pelagianism, or Semi-pelagianism, to reconcile the divine decrees with human liberty. On the other hand, both Lutherans and Calvinists, following the example of Augustine, rejected the notion of the freedom of the will, and denied every co-operation on the part of man. Nevertheless it is a striking fact, that the Lutherans avoided the strict consequences of the Augustinian system, and asserted that the decrees of God are conditional, while the Calvinists not only admitted the necessity of those consequences, but having once determined the idea of Predestination, went so far as to maintain that the fall of man itself was predestinated by God (Supralapsarianism).' Quoting freely from Calvin, his major influence in this work, Knox lays low the heresy that man plays any part in his own salvation. This heresy, of man's pretended ability to save himself (in any way), is at the root of all defection from the sovereign God of Scripture and is rampant today! As Kevin Reed notes, in refuting this Anabaptist, Knox unequivocally states, 'For with the Pelagians and papists, you have become teachers of free will, and defenders of your own justice,' clearly recognizing that, 'the defense of man's free will, to do good and avoid evil,' is 'the damned heresy of Pelagius.' Moreover, regarding this work, Reed continues, 'A perceptive reading of this dispute will reveal the parallels between the Anabaptists and modern proponents of free will. Advocates for free will are commonly found among Baptists, 'evangelicals,' Charismatics, and cultists. Their line of argumentation is virtually identical to that of Knox's opponent'. (John Knox the Forgotten Reformer, forthcoming, pp. 219-20).
"This book contains significant information for defeating the forces of antichrist today; for he (especially ecclesiastical antichrist) continues to manifest the same spirit of error seen in the days of Knox, deceiving men into thinking that they, in some way (be it ever so small), are able to save themselves." -- SWRB

*KNOX, JOHN, Against Romish Rites and Political and Ecclesiastical Tyranny (1554), (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books).
"Formerly titled 'A Faithful Admonition to the Professors of God's Truth in England,' this letter is said to be 'undoubtedly the most important' of Knox's writings (up to that time) by W. Stanford Reid in Trumpeter of God (p. 114). Furthermore Reid notes that Knox's '[v]iews on the magistrate expressed in the 'Faithful Admonition,' were to have an important influence upon much of his future conduct, and upon the development of the Reformation in both England and Scotland.' The editor of Knox's Works states, '[t]he object of the Admonition was twofold. The one was to animate those who had made a good profession to perseverance, and to avoid the sin of apologetical, or appearing to conform to the 'abominable idolatry' re-established in England; the other, to point out the dangers to be apprehended in when the kingdom became subjected to the dominion of strangers.' Knox uses very strong language here, in the hopes of getting through to those who came to be termed Nicodemites (i.e. those who thought that they could 'keep faith secretly in the heart, and yet do as idolaters do,' in Knox's own words). Written at a time when the true church had been driven underground by Roman Catholic persecution, it was said concerning this letter that 'many other godly men besides have been exposed to the risk of their property, and even life itself, upon the sole ground of either having had this book in their possession, or having read it.' Kevin Reed gives an excellent summary of this letter in Selected Writings of John Knox, when, in part, he writes, '[w]hile acknowledging the risk of persecution to the faithful, the reformer perceives a greater danger in compromising with idolatry. Government persecution may bring disfavour of men, loss of personal goods and, in some cases, physical death; but idolatry brings down the wrath of God, resulting in grievous punishments, now and through eternity. Idolatry also invites a curse upon the posterity of the nation. In an intense pastoral appeal, Knox strongly admonishes his readers to avoid conforming to the Romish rites of worship' (p. 220). For those who would rather read many of these Knox items with contemporary spelling, punctuation, and grammar we highly recommend the Selected Writings of John Knox." -- SWRB
http://www.swrb.com/newslett/actualnls/FaithAdm.htm
Additional Title???: An Admonition or warning that the faithful Christians in London, Newcastel, Barwycke, and others, may avoide God's vengeance; A godly letter sent to the fayethfull in London, Newcastell, Barwyke, and to all other within the realme off Englande, that love the comming of oure Lorde Jesus by John Knox, EEBO.

*Knox, John, First and Second Books of Discipline (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books, 1997).
" 'Knox and five others drafted the Book of Discipline (1560), which set forth a blueprint for the ideal Christian society,' notes the ENCYCLOPEDIA OF THE REFORMED FAITH. 'THE BOOK OF DISCIPLINE was used in conjunction with Calvin's Catechism and the book of order previously used by the English congregation in Geneva,' writes Reed (JOHN KNOX THE FORGOTTEN REFORMER, p. 31). This version includes Calderwood's fiery preface to the 1621 edition. The FIRST BOOK contains an extensive treatment of church polity reflecting principles pertaining to this formative period concerning the Scottish church. Another prominent feature of the FIRST BOOK is its visionary program for Christian education. Furthermore, it 'asserted the authority of Scripture, and it demonstrates that the regulative principle of worship is merely a natural application of the sola scriptura rule of Protestant theology' (Ibid., p. 76). The SECOND BOOK, often called the 'MAGNA CARTA OF PRESBYTERIANISM,' focuses more specifically on matters of polity relating to an established and reformed church, laying out the key tenets of Presbyterian government. It also gives attention to the doctrine of the civil magistrate. Both books prefigure the WESTMINSTER STANDARDS in many respects, as well as exhibiting the genius of Scottish Presbyterianism (as noted in the helpful Publisher's Introduction by Kevin Reed). Contains contemporary spelling, punctuation and grammar." -- SWRB

*Knox, John, On Rebellion, Roger Mason, editor (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books, 1997).
"This compilation brings together, for the first time, all of Knox's most important political writings. It shows, in Knox's own words, how he directly and faithfully confronted the problem of resistance to tyranny. It is especially illustrative in regard to how Knox made application of Scripture to the specific circumstances of the Scottish Reformation and the rule of Mary, Queen of Scots. It includes his First Blast of the Trumpet against the Monstrous Regiment of Women, the Appellation to the Scottish Nobility, his confrontations with Lethington (the Queens's secretary) during the General Assembly, and much more. Reconstructionists, and all serious students of the Reformation, will welcome this volume, as it conclusively proves that Knox held to some very specific points related to Theonomic ethics. Knox even went so far as to call for the execution of the Queen, because she was publicly promoting sedition (against Christ the King) in her celebration of the idolatrous Popish Mass. He based his reasoning, including negative civil penal sanctions, on Old Testament case law. B.K. Kuiper says of him, "After Knox returned to Scotland the Reformation in that land swept forward . . . The preaching of Knox was like a spark in a keg of gunpowder. Wherever he preached there followed an iconoclastic explosion. Images were broken and monasteries stormed by the mob. He wrote: 'The places of idolatry were made level with the ground, the monuments of idolatry consumed with fire, and priests were commanded under pain of death to desist from their blasphemous mass . . . The pope's authority and all jurisdiction by Catholic prelates was abolished, and the celebration of the mass was forbidden. Maintenance of the true religion was declared to be the prime duty of government . . .' (The Church in History, pp. 217-18). This book will leave no doubt in your mind as to why Knox has been called "Calvin with a sword." It will light a fire in your soul for righteousness in civil matters -- something the Reformers often addressed!" -- SWRB

MacInnes, Allan, Charles I and the Making of the Covenanting Movement 1625-1641

*Manton, Thomas, The Complete Works of Thomas Manton, 22 volumes (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: ).
"Manton was 'one of the most eminent of the Nonconformist divines.' He was born in 1620 and died in 1677. He was chosen to write The Epistle to the Reader: Especially Heads of Families' of the famous Westminster standards. Received 'Episcopal Institution' in 1661. Resigned in 1662, on account of the Act of Uniformity (which among other wicked, Satanic enactments, its principal terms required a 'declaration of unfeigned assent and consent' to everything contained in the BOOK OF COMMON PRAYER, re-ordination for those not episcopally ordained and, most evil of all, 'a renunciation of the Solemn League and Covenant. Knowing that the Puritans would not submit to such terms, the Authorities framed the Act to secure their expulsion' (cf. Sermons of the Great Ejection by Iain Murray [Banner of Truth, reprinted 1962]). He was a man of great learning and extensive reading, of a sound judgement, and had the art of reducing volumes of divinity into a narrow compass. According to Charnock, he was the best collector of sense of the age. Dr. Bates says , 'A clear judgement, rich fancy, strong memory, and happy elocution, met in him, and were excellently improved by diligent study'" (James Darling, Cyclopaedia Bibliographica, 1854, pp. 1953-1954). Includes Manton's better known volumes, such as his commentary on James and Jude and his Sermons on Psalm 119, as well as a host of other practical preaching, teaching and Scriptural exposition. The 22nd volume contains two large indices (by subject and text). A full list of everything included in this massive set is at http://www.swrb.com/catalog/M.htm
The Thomas Manton Home Page
http://www.smartlink.net/~phillipj/manton/manton.htm

*M'Crie, Thomas, Life of Knox, 1831 (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books). ATLA 1988-1305.
"Iain Murray, in his stirring introduction to Cunningham's Historical Theology writes, `The third event marking the commencement of this spiritual movement was the publication of a book in 1811. It was the biography of John Knox by Thomas M'Crie. All over Scotland this work was used to revive the memory of the great Reformer and nothing could have been a more telling protest against the stifling influence of Moderatism. It brought many a student and minister into the experience once described by James Fraser of Bera in his Memoirs: "When I read Knox, I thought I saw another scheme of divinity, much more agreeable to the Scriptures and to my experience than the modern." M'Crie followed this up in 1819 with a biography of Knox's great successor, Andrew Melville, and these two books became known as the "Iliad and Odyssey of the Scottish Church." Just as Homer's heroes fired the hearts of many imitators so M'Crie's biographies aroused a holy ambition in many to follow the noble example of these two spiritual giants.' M'Crie's work is an undisputed classic regarding this fiery reformer. It exhibits information on Knox and the Scottish Reformation which has been hid in manuscripts and books which are now little known or consulted. Knox may be the most pertinent Reformer to study in our day of widespread idolatry, pluralism, anti-Christian government, humanistic law, relativism, and the revival of that `masterpiece of Satan,' Roman Catholicism. Read everything that you can get your hands on -- either by or about Knox; you'll never be the same again!" -- SWRB

*M'Crie, Thomas, Jr., Scottish Church History: Embracing the Period from the Reformation to the Revolution Adapted to a popular audience and written in a conversational tone, 2nd edition, 1843 (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books, 1997, 1843).
" 'The object of the volume' states the author (a Presbyterian of the old school), 'is to exhibit the more prominent and characteristic features of our Church History, than to enter into details, or to develop the internal character of the Church in her ecclesiastical acts and proceedings'."

*McFeeters, James Calvin, Sketches of the Covenanters (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books).
"Stirring accounts of sacrifice and martyrdom for the Reformed Faith that will bring tears to eyes of all but the backslidden. Follows the chain of events which gave Scotland two Reformations and a Revolution. Knox, the National Covenant, the Westminster Assembly, the Field Meetings, and much more is covered. The history of great battles for Christ and His royal rights are recounted in this moving history book. Sheds much light upon the warfare with the dragon for true liberty. One of our best history books, highly recommended!" -- SWRB

*McKnight, W.J., Covenanting, Communion and Confessions: With a Short Summary of the Westminster Confession of Faith Deals With the Terms of Communion as They Relate to the Reformation Creeds and the Westminster Confession (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books).
"Defends creedalism and the historic progress evident in the faithful creeds. Touches on covenanting. Contains a useful summary of every chapter of the WCF. In classic Reformed Presbyterian style, the author notes the testimony of the martyrs in leaving 'a noble example for us and our posterity to follow, in contending for all divine truth, and in testifying against all contrary evils, which may exist in the corrupt constitutions of either church or state'."" -- SWRB

McWard, Robert, Earnest Contendings for the Faith (1723) (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books).
"McWard 'strongly opposed the Resolutions' and 'for a sermon preached at Glasgow from Amos 3:2, in February, 1661, he was banished to Holland . . . He collected and arranged the papers of his preceptor, Samuel Rutherford, and gave to the world his 'Letters' (Johnston, TREASURY OF THE SCOTTISH COVENANT, p. 342). DICTIONARY OF SCOTTISH CHURCH HISTORY AND THEOLOGY, p. 537-38 also notes that McWard 'studied at St. Andrews where he was a favorite of Samuel Rutherford' and that 'when Rutherford went to London as a Commissioner to the Westminster Assembly, McWard accompanied his as an amanuensis . . . was a zealous Protester . . . in 1661 he preached against an overturning of the Covenanted Reformation by Parliament, entering a protest in heaven that he desired to be free from the guilt thereof. He was imprisoned 'for sedition and treasonable preaching . . . he helped with the editing and publication of Rutherford's Examen Arminianismi (Utrecht, 1668) . . . wrote several tracts to encourage resistance to those whom he believed were usurpers of power in the Church of Scotland. He asserted that is was not, as then constituted, 'of the genus Church at all, -- that, by its mere physical force-raid on the real Church of Scotland, it has proved itself to be absolutely devoid of ecclesiastical rights.' . . . such publications rendered McWard, with his close friend John Brown of Wamphray, odious to the regime of Charles II, and diligent efforts were made to have him expelled from Holland . . . He continued zealous against the Indulgences, opposing the efforts of Robert Fleming, his successor, at conciliation (see Earnest Contendings for the Faith) . . . Wodrow characterized him as 'a person of great knowledge, zeal, learning, and remarkable ministerial abilities'." The answers to Robert Fleming's proposals for union with the indulged (found in Earnest Contendings and as set in the historical context noted above) exhibit the true spirit of the covenanting movement in regard to numerous church issues (such as separation, schism, covenanted obligations, the nature of the visible church, attainments, etc.). The principles set forth by McWard, as a faithful defender of the Covenanted Reformation, can be easily applied to the current state of declension in the modern Presbyterian and Reformed churches. This makes McWard's book a exceedingly helpful aid, regarding a broad spectrum of practical church issues, for those seeking to maintain the original (as held to by most of the Westminster Divines) covenanted testimony in our day. 416 pages, this book contains a glossary and index." -- SWRB

*Mitchell, Alexander F., Minutes of the Sessions of the Westminster Assembly of Divines While Engaged in Preparing Their Directory for Church Government, Confession of Faith, and Catechisms (November 1644 to March 1649), 1874 edition (Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books).
"Warfield states, 'The fundamental authority for the study of the work of the Assembly for the period covered by it is, of course, the volume of its Minutes edited by Drs. A.F. Mitchell and John Struthers.' This work was also called the best book concerning the Assembly by Gregg Singer. It was compiled from transcripts originally procured by a committee of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland. An invaluable aid for all those who love creedal Christianity. A very rare resource that should contribute much to the ongoing Reformation." -- SWRB

*Mitchell, Alexander F., The Scottish Reformation: Its Epochs, Episodes, Leaders, and Distinctive Characteristics (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books, 1997). ATLA 1988-1015
"David Hay Fleming (editor) who states that 'the present volume is valuable in several ways, not the least of these being that it embodies, on many obscure and important points, the matured views of one of the most competent and cautious of historical students -- one who grudged no time and spared no labour in eliciting and elucidating the truth.' Contains a biographical sketch of the author by James Christie. Hits all the high points of Reformational development in Scotland, including Hamilton, Wishart, Knox, the 1560 Confession, the First and Second Books of Discipline, etc." -- SWRB

*Mitchell, Alexander F., The Westminster Assembly: Its History and Standards (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books, 1997).
"William Hetherington has written: 'Every person who has directed his attention to the events of the seventeenth century, whether with regard to their civil or their religious aspect, has felt that it was impossible fully to understand either the one or the other line of study, without taking into view the character of the Westminster Assembly, the purpose for which it met, and the result of its deliberations... (T)he man who penetrates a little deeper into the nature of those unrevealed but powerful influences which move a nation's mind, and mould its destinies, will be ready to direct his attention more profoundly to the objects and deliberations of an assembly which met at a moment so critical, and was composed of the great master-minds of the age; and the theologian who has learned to view religion as the vital principle of human nature, equally in nations and in the individual man, will not easily admit that weak idea, that such an assembly could have been an isolated event, but will be disposed earnestly to inquire what led to its meeting, and what important consequences followed. And although the subject has not hitherto been investigated with such a view, it may, we trust, be possible to prove, that it was the most important event in the century in which it occurred; and that it has exerted, and in all probability will yet exert, a far more wide and permanent influence upon both the civil and the religious history of mankind than has generally been ever imagined.' (Hetherington The History of the Westminster Assembly of Divines, pp. 16-17). Beattie (Memorial Volume, p. xxxv, 1879) called this book, 'perhaps the best single popular book on the Assembly yet published.' Read this rare item and find out why. Limited stock remaining. When our hardcover stock is depleted we will substitute a 'bound photocopy' edition in its place, at the same low price, unless you instruct us otherwise.
"In the first three lectures, the author has given a succinct account of English Puritanism from its origin to the meeting of the Westminster Assembly, and in the tenth lecture, he has given a similar account of the history of doctrine in the British Churches during the same period. The seven intervening lectures were prepared in accord with the author's desire to complete his researches on the Westminster Assembly. Throughout this work, Mitchell has endeavored to give prominence to aspects of this magnificent period in Puritan history which have hitherto been generally overlooked and to treat more briefly of those which have been previously dwelt on -- making this the ideal companion volume to Hetherington's THE HISTORY OF THE WESTMINSTER ASSEMBLY OF DIVINES and Gillespie's notes taken at this assembly (found in his Works). Moreover, Mitchell writes in an irenic manner, making this a perfect introductory volume to Puritanism and the work of the Assembly. Mitchell notes the importance of the Westminster Assembly in the following manner, 'Richard Baxter, who was perhaps as competent as any of their contemporaries to give an impartial verdict, does not hesitate to affirm that 'the divines there congregated were men of eminent learning and godliness, ministerial ability and fidelity; and being not worthy,' he modestly adds, 'to be one of them myself, I may the more freely speak that truth which I know, even in the face of malice and envy, that so far as I am able to judge bythe information of all history . . . the Christian world since the days of the apostles had never a Synod of more excellent divines.' (p. 118). Thus, it has been noted by many, that next to the Scripture itself, there is probably more to be gained from the study of this segment of history (and the works of the men God called to produce the Puritan intellect and the Westminster family of documents) than any other single period of history -- right up to the present era. Mitchell's account of this age of brilliance is a veritable information cornucopia in which all lovers of Puritanism, the Westminster Assembly, and especially the truth of Christ (which these our forefathers in the faith so boldly proclaimed) can readily take delight! 'The Westminster Assembly, if it does not form a landmark in the history of our common Protestantism, must at least be admitted to constitute an epoch, and a notable one, in the history of Puritanism,' notes Mitchell. Don't miss this fine historical account. Hardcover copies of this item will be send until our present stock is depleted." -- SWRB

Morrill, John (editor), The Scottish National Covenant in Its British Context, 1638-1651

Ogden, Greg, The New Reformation: Returning the Ministry to the People of God
"Ministry is to be by the people and for the people, and this book explains why it is needed and how it can be done." -- Synopsis

Parliament, The First Parliament During the Reign of James VI of Scotland, CHRIST'S TRIUMPHANT ENTRY INTO SCOTLAND; Or, The Subjugation of the People, Laws, Liberties, & Crown of Scotland to HIS SUPREME MAJESTY JESUS CHRIST, King of Kings, and Lord of Lords; Being, The Complete Text of all of the Acts of the First Parliament During the Reign of James VI of Scotland.
http://truecovenanter.com/official/acts_of_parliament_scotland_james_vi_p01.phtml

Paul, Robert S., The Assembly of the Lord: Politics and Religion in the Westminster Assembly and the Grand Debate (Herndon, VA: Books International, Incorporated). [20283]
"Too bad this excellent book is so expensive. It is the kind of book that anybody interested in the background of the Westminster Assembly would enjoy reading. Detailed, scholarly, and thoroughly documented. We think it is well worth the price for the understanding that it imparts." -- GCB

*Price, Greg, The Auchensaugh Renovation (Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books, 1997), 2 audio cassettes.
"This is the story of the renewal of the National and Solemn League and Covenant, which took place under the leadership of John Macmillan (cf. The Cameronian Apostle by Reid) at Auchensaugh, July 24, 1712. Events leading up to this renewal are especially pertinent, as they expose the Satanic tactics which often become most useful to the devil in attacking all revivals and those seeking to return to covenanted attainments. Price notes how Cromwell's tolerationism opened the floodgates of iniquity and helped pave the way (though not intended by the covenant breaking Cromwellians) for the tyranny of Charles II. This set the stage for the corrupted and defective revolution of 1688 and the malignant Revolution church, which left the covenanted Reformation buried under the debris of William's Erastianism, Prelacy (in England and Ireland) and the compromised Presbyterianism of the Revolution Church in Scotland (cf. Clarkson's Plain Reasons for Presbyterians Dissenting from the Revolution Church of Scotland; this Revolution church was the root of much modern day Presbyterian defection and this book still eloquently denounces this defection). The Auchensaugh Renovation cleared away all the Reformation denying rubbish that had accumulated from 1649 to 1712, and 'being agreeable to the Word of God' became part of the terms of communion of the Reformed Presbyterian church on Nov. 3, 1712 (cf. Terms of Ministerial and Christian Communion in the Reformed Presbyterian Church, point 4 of 6). It is also interesting to note that at the Lord's Supper (on July 27, 1712) following this covenant renewal, Macmillan, in 'fencing the tables' proclaimed, 'I excommunicate and debar from this Holy Table of the Lord, all devisers, commanders, users, or approvers, of any religious worship not instituted by God in His Word, all tolerators and countenancers thereof; and by consequence I debar and excommunicate from this Holy Table of the Lord, Queen and Parliament, and all under them, who spread and propagate or tolerate a false and superstitious worship, ay, and until they repent.' Furthermore, concerning those who opposed the covenants and the work of reformation, Macmillan trumpeted these faithful words, 'I excommunicate and debar all who are opposers of our covenants and covenanted Reformation, and all that have taken oaths contrary to our covenants, and such particularly as are takers of the Oath of Abjuration, whether Ministers or others, until they repent' (Reformed Presbytery, The Auchensaugh Renovation . . ., p. 55). Beyond the fascinating and detailed story of the history and reasons for the Auchensaugh renovation of the covenants, these studies also clearly and biblically explain the continuing obligation to renew lawful covenants, makes application to our day, and demonstrates how covenanting was foundational to the Second Reformation. A fine (and unique) set of tapes defending the attainments of our covenanted Reformation! For more information see our bound photocopy The Auchensaugh Renovation . . . by the Reformed Presbytery." -- SWRB
The Auchensaugh Renovation
http://www.covenanter.org/RefPres/auchensaugh.htm

*Reformed Presbytery, A Short Vindication of our Covenanted Reformation, 1879 (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books, 1997).
"Until the church comes to terms with what is written in this book it will remain weak and divided. Covenant breakers will not prosper, as this rare item demonstrates from both Scripture and history. The power packed ordinance of covenanting (the National and Solemn League and Covenant in particular), was foundational to the Second Reformation and the work of the Westminster Assembly. 'By the National Covenant our fathers laid Popery prostrate. By the Solemn League and Covenant they were successful in resisting prelatic encroachments and civil tyranny. By it they were enabled to achieve the Second Reformation . . . They were setting up landmarks by which the location and limits of the city of God will be known at the dawn of the millennial day . . . How can they be said to go forth by the footsteps of the flock, who have declined from the attainments, renounced the covenants and contradicted the testimony of 'the cloud of witnesses.'All the schisms (separations) that disfigure the body mystical of Christ . . . are the legitimate consequences of the abandonment of reformation attainments, the violation of covenant engagements.' If you are interested in knowing how to recognize a faithful church (or state), when and why to separate from unfaithful institutions, who has held up the standard of covenanted Reformation attainments and who has backslidden (and why), what it means to subscribe to the Westminster Confession (and why most that say they do so today do not have any idea of what that means), and much more concerning individual, family, church and civil duties, this is one of the best books you will ever lay your hands on. It chronicles 'some instances of worldly conformity and mark(s) some steps of defection from our 'covenanted unity and uniformity,' noting how 'it is necessary to take a retrospect of our history for many years; for we did not all at once reach our present condition of sinful ignorance and manifold apostasy.' Presbyterian and the Reformed churches lay under the heavy hand of God's judgement in our day, because of the very defections noted throughout this fine work. 'We heard (hear) from various quarters the cry, 'maintain the truth, stand up for the principles of the Second Reformation;' and yet many of those who are the most loud in uttering this cry, appear desirous to bury in oblivion those imperishable national and ecclesiastical deeds, by which the church and kingdom of Scotland became 'married to the Lord.' Are we married to the Lord, or have we thrown off the covenants of our forefathers; are we the chaste bride of Christ, or a harlot who is found in the bedchambers of every devilish suitor (whether ecclesiastical or civil) who tempts us with the favors of this world? Let us cry out, as with 'the noble Marquis of Argyle, upon the scaffold,' when he said, 'God hath tied us by covenants to religion and reformation. These that were then unborn are yet engaged, and it passeth the power of all the magistrates under heaven to absolve them from the oath of God. They deceive themselves, and it may be, would deceive others, who think otherwise.' Not for the weak of heart." -- SWRB
A Short Vindication of our Covenanted Reformation, Reformed Presbytery
http://www.covenanter.org/RPCCov/shortvindication.htm

*RENWICK, JAMES, ALEXANDER SHIELDS AND OTHER "SOCIETY PEOPLE," An Informatory Vindication (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books, 1687)
"Informatory Vindication (1687), a statement of principles issued by the Society People (see Societies, United) during James VII's reign. Prepared mainly by James Renwick, latterly in consultation with Alexander Shields, it was published in Utrecht. Its full title reflects something of the contents: 'An Informatory Vindication of a Poor Wasted Misrepresented Remnant of the Suffering Anti-Popish Anti-Prelatic Anti-Erastian Anti-Sectarian True Presbyterian Church of Christ in Scotland united together in a General Correspondence. By Way of Reply to Various Accusations in Letters Informations and Conferences given forth against them.' It refuted charges brought against the 'Remnant' of schism (in their eyes a great evil)... The Vindication mourned the estrangement from other Presbyterians who had accepted the government's Indulgences or Edicts of Toleration, and expressed love for them as fellow-ministers 'with whom again we would desire to have communion in ordinances'. The separation had been forced upon the Society People by the tyranny and temper of the times, but it did not affect their position as being in the succession of the historic Kirk of Scotland. The document aimed to clear away the hostility and misunderstanding about them that had grown up in Scotland and Holland." (Cameron, editor, DICTIONARY OF SCOTTISH CHURCH HISTORY AND THEOLOGY, p. 429) "In proof of the catholic, unsectarian, Christian spirit of Renwick and his followers, the clear statements of the INFORMATORY VINDICATION, the work which most fully and clearly defines their position, may be referred to... In these noble utterances, we have strikingly exemplified the true spirit of Christian brotherhood... This is the genuine import of the vow of the Solemn League and Covenant, which binds Covenanters to regard whatever is done to the least of them, as done to all and to every one in particular. While firmly holding fast all Scriptural attainments, and contending "earnestly for the faith once delivered to the saints," we should cordially rejoice in the evidences of grace in Christ's servants wherever we find them. We should love them as brethren, fulfil the law of Christ by bearing their burdens, wish them God speed in all that they are doing for the advancement of His glory, and fervently labour and pray for the coming of the happy period when divisions and animosities shall cease, and when there shall be one King, and His name one in all the earth. The testimony of Renwick and his associates is of permanent value and of special importance in our day, as it was directed against systems of error and idolatry, which serve to corrupt the Church and enslave the State. Against Popery in every form Renwick was a heroic and uncompromising witness. At the peril of life, he publicly testified against the usurpation of the papist James, and rejected him as having no claim to be regarded as a constitutional sovereign, and as utterly disqualified to reign in a Protestant reformed land. This was the main ground of his objection against James' toleration, for which the Indulged ministers tendered obsequious thanks to the usurper. Yet this edict of toleration was issued for the purpose of opening the way for the practice of Rome's abominations, and for the advancement of papists to places of power and trust in the nation. None of the Cameronians would, for any earthly consideration, even to save their lives, for a moment admit that a papist had any right to exercise political power in a reformed land. Our martyred forefathers we regard as worthy of high respect and imitation, for their deeply cherished dread of the growing influence of Popery, and for their determined resistance to its exclusive and extravagant claims. The system of Popery is the abnegation of all precious gospel truth; and is a complete politico-religious confederacy against the best interests of a Protestant nation. The boast of its abettors is that it is semper eadem ever the same. Rome cannot reform herself from within, and she is incapable of reformation from external influences and agencies. The Bible never speaks of Antichrist as to be reformed, but as waxing worse and worse till the time when he shall be completely subverted and irrecoverably destroyed. Whatever changes may be going on in some Popish countries, whereby the power of the Papacy is weakened, it is evident that the principles and spirit of the Romish priesthood, and of those who are under their influence, remain unchanged. The errors of the Antichristian system, instead of being diminished, have of late years increased. Creature worship has become more marked and general. The Immaculate Conception has been proclaimed by Papal authority as the creed of Romanism. In these countries, and some other Protestant lands, the influence of Popery in government and education, and so on the whole social system, has been greatly on the increase. Among those who have most deeply studied inspired prophecy, there is a general expectation that the period of Babylon's downfall is hastening on, and is not far distant. There is a general presentiment too, that the Man of Sin, prior to his downfall, will make some dire and violent attempt through his infatuated followers against the truth, and against such as faithfully maintain it. The 'Slaying of the Witnesses," which we are disposed to regard as yet future may take place, not so much by the actual shedding of blood, though it is plain that Jesuit policy and violence will not hesitate to re-enact former persecution and massacre, to accomplish a desired purpose. It may mainly be effected, as Scott, the expositor, suggests, by silencing the voice of a public testimony in behalf of fundamental truths throughout Christendom; and of this there are at present unmistakable signs not a few, throughout the churches in various countries. The Protestant church in all its sections should be thoroughly awake to its danger from the destructive errors, idolatry and power of its ancient irreconcilable enemy; and should, by all legitimate means, labour to counteract and nullify its political influence. The ministry and the rising youth of the church should study carefully the Popish controversy, and should be intimately acquainted with the history of the rise and progress of the Papacy its assumed blasphemous power its accumulated errors and delusions, and its plots, varied persecutions and cruel butcheries of Christ's faithful witnesses. Above all, they should set themselves earnestly, prayerfully and perseveringly to diffuse the Bible and Gospel light in the dark parts of their native country, and among Romanists in other lands. By embracing fully and holding fast, in their practical application, the principles of the British Covenants, and by imbibing the spirit of covenanted martyrs men like Renwick and the Cameronians, we will be prepared for the last conflict with Antichrist. The firm and faithful maintenance of a martyr-testimony will be a principle instrument of the victory of truth over the error and idolatry of Rome. 'They overcame him by the blood of the Lamb, and the word of their testimony; and they loved not their lives unto the death,' (Rev. 12:11.) Finally, the testimony of Renwick is valuable, as throwing light on great evils connected with systems of civil government, and with Protestant churches, and as pointing out clearly the duty of faithful witnesses in relation to them. Two great principles, the one doctrinal, and the other practical, were essential to it, or rather constituted its whole specialty. These were, first, that, according to the national vows, and the reformation attainments, the whole civil polity of the nation should be conformed to the Scriptures, and secondly, the positive duty of distinct separation from whatever systems in the state and church that are opposed to entire allegiance to Messiah the Prince" (Houston, The Life of James Renwick, pp. 52-55). "Some of them, particularly in Scotland, loved not their lives unto death for the word of God, and for the testimony which they held. Rev. vi. 9. These refused to have communion in public ordinances not only with prelatical ministers, but even with the acceptors of indulgences or licenses from the civil power, to exercise their ministry under certain limitations. The Informatory Vindication, which certainly contains the genuine principles of church communion, held by the sufferers for the cause of Christ in that period, declares, that they could by no means own or countenance the administrations of the indulged ministers; because they considered the indulgence, in any of the forms in which it was granted by the civil power, as derived from the supremacy claimed by that power in ecclesiastical matters; as laying the office of the ministry under unwarrantable restriction; and as tending, in a great measure, to suppress and bury the covenanted reformation, cf. Informatory Vindication, Head iv." (Anderson, Alexander and Rufus; or a Series of Dialogues on Church Communion [1862], p. 294) "To the friends of evangelical truth, and the faithful witnesses for the redeemer's royal prerogatives, the services of Renwick, at the crisis in which he exercised his public ministry, were invaluable. He was eminently the man for the time. Through the influence of the unhappy Indulgence, the strict Covenanters were reduced to what they style themselves in the Informatory Vindication, a 'wasted, suffering, anti-popish, anti-prelatic, anti-erastian, anti-sectarian remnant.' By the death of Cargill and Cameron, they were left as 'sheep without a shepherd,' broken and scattered. Through the fierceness of persecution, and the machinations of enemies, they were in danger of falling into confusion, and of being entirely wasted and destroyed. We admire the gracious providence of God in preparing, at this particular crisis, an instrument of such rare and suitable endowments for feeding 'the flock in the wilderness,' and for unfurling and upholding so nobly the 'Banner of truth' amidst hosts of infuriated enemies. James Renwick, though a very youth when he entered on his arduous work, and trained under great outward disadvantages, had a powerful and well-cultivated mind. He was endowed with singular administrative talent, and had great tact and skill in managing men. He was an acute and logical thinker, an eloquent and attractive public speaker, and was distinguished by fertility and force as a writer. The Informatory Vindication his testimony against king James' toleration, with his 'Letters,' and 'Sermons and Lectures,' bear ample evidence of his sound judgment, comprehensive mind, and ability as an author. His prudence, meekness and loving disposition, combined with his sanctified zeal, and heroic courage, deservedly gave him great influence among those to whom he ministered. He was eminently fitted to be 'a first man among men.' The Lord held him in the hollow of his hand, and made him a 'polished shaft in his quiver.' The services which Renwick rendered to the Protestant cause were invaluable. He organized the scattered remnant, and imparted new life and ardour to their proceedings. He set forth clearly the principles of the 'Society people;' and in a number of able and logical papers, clearly defined their plans of action. He rendered it, in a great measure, impossible for enemies to misrepresent and accuse them falsely to the Government. He was their Secretary in their correspondence with foreign churches; and he did much to evoke the prayerful sympathy of Protestants in other lands in behalf of the victims of persecution in Scotland. The presence and influence of Renwick among the suffering Presbyterians were of the highest importance in his own day; and not to them alone, but also to the whole church of Christ in these lands, and to the constitutional liberties of the nation. So far as we can see, but for the singular power and devoted spirit of Renwick, and the firm and unyielding position which the Cameronians through him were led to assume, the cause of truth would have been completely borne down, and Erastianism, and Popery, and Despotism had triumphed. Renwick and his followers were the vanguard 'in the struggle for Britain's liberties, and for the Church's spiritual independence.' Though, like other patriots born before their time, they were doomed to fall, yet posterity owes to them a large part of the goodly heritage which they enjoy. (Houston, The Life of James Renwick [1865], pp. 36-37). Emphases added throughout the preceding quotations. This is a very rare and valuable specimen of Paleopresbyterian (Covenanter) thought don't miss it! 142 pages, plus new material added by the present publisher." -- SWRB
An Informatory Vindication, 1687, James, Renwick, Alexander Shields and Other "Society People"
http://www.truecovenanter.com/societies/informatory_vindication.html
Renwick, James. An informatory vindication of a poor, wasted, misrepresented remnant of the suffering, anti-popish, anti-prelatick, anti-erastian, anti-sectarian, true Presbyterian Church of Christ in Scotland. United together in a general correspondence. By way of reply to various accusations, ... Written at the Leadhills in the year 1687, conjunctly by Mr. James Renwick and Mr. Alexander Shiells ... Edinburgh, 1744. (ECCO) Gale Document Number CW3320326202

*RENWICK, JAMES, The Right of Dissent From an Immoral Civil Government (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books). Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #26, ISBN: 0921148224 9780921148227.
"Maintains the hard-core covenanter position, the great principle of dissent and separation from immoral civil governments. Argues that mere existence does not qualify a civil government as 'the ordinance of God' (Romans 13:2). Answers common objections to this position, including how Joseph, Nehemiah and Daniel could hold office under immoral civil governments. Renwick was a hunted Covenanter minister, who was martyred (at 26 years of age) for his uncompromising defense of the work of covenanted reformation. Willson's book, CIVIL GOVERNMENT and Samuel B. Wylie's softcover book TWO SONS OF OIL: OR, THE FAITHFUL WITNESS FOR MAGISTRACY AND MINISTRY UPON A SCRIPTURAL BASIS." -- SWRB

Roberts, William L., The Duty of Covenanting, and the Permanent Obligation of Religious Covenants, 1853 (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books, 1997).
"Excerpted from the Reformed Presbyterian Catechism below, this book deals with an almost forgotten ordinance of God. It explains what covenants are, while contrasting them with oaths, vows and law. Furthermore, it distinguishes between civil and religious covenants and shows how the individual, family, church or nation can (and should) enter into covenants -- especially religious covenants. Explains why, when and how covenants are binding on posterity, citing abundant Scriptural proof for each assertion made. Here is a sample argument from this book, demonstrating how even covenants made between men are viewed as binding upon posterity by God himself: 'Another instance in which posterity is recognized in covenant obligation is found in Joshua 9:15. This covenant was made between the children of Israel and the Gibeonites. Between four and five hundred years after that time, the children of Israel are visited with a very severe famine, in the days of David. 2 Sam. 21:1. And it is expressly declared by the Lord that, 'It is for Saul, and for his bloody house, because he slew the Gibeonites.' And at the same time, v. 2, that very covenant is recognized, and the breach of it is stated, as being the formal reason of the divine displeasure. Now, had it not been for this covenant, the extirpation of the Gibeonites would not have been imputed to Israel as a thing criminal; for they were comprehended in Canaanitish nations, which God had commanded them to root out' (pp. 139-140). Take the time to look these verses up. This subject has great bearing on the unity of the church, the Christian's response to godless covenant-breaking nations, hermeneutics, the family and general faithfulness to God (because many today -- individually, ecclesiastically, and nationally -- are breaking covenants which God still views as binding though they are oblivious to this obligation)." -- SWRB
The Duty of Covenanting, and the Permanent Obligation of Religious Covenants
http://www.swrb.com/newslett/actualnls/PresCatCov.htm
Reformed Presbyterian Catechism, William L. Roberts D.D.
http://www.covenantedreformation.com/Essays/RP%20Catecchism/RP%20Index.html

Rutherford, Samuel, Christ Dying, and Drawing Sinners to Himself, 1647, 1727 edition (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books), EEBO.
"The title continues (providing a nice summary for this rare valuable work): 'Or, A Survey of our Saviour in His Soul-Suffering, His Loveliness in his Death, and the Efficacy thereof. In Which Some Cases of Soul-trouble in weak Believers, Grounds of Submission under the Absence of Christ, with the Flowings and Heightenings of free Grace, are opened. Delivered in Sermons on the Gospel according to John, Chap. xii. ver. 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33. Where are also interjected some necessary Digressions, for the Times, touching divers Errors of Antinomians; and a short Vindication of the Doctrine of Protestants, from the Arminian pretended Universality of Christ's Dying for All and every One of Mankind; the moral and feigned Way of irresistable Conversion of Sinners; and what Faith is required of all within the visible Church, for the Want whereof, many are condemned.' The DICTIONARY OF SCOTTISH CHURCH HISTORY AND THEOLOGY says of this work, 'Rutherford's writings during the London years provide a significant commentary of the theology of the Westminster Confession and Catechisms. In Christ Dying and Drawing Sinners to Himself Rutherford elaborately scrutinizes the Antinomian notion that the law has no obligation for the Christian' (p. 736). This book contains an extensive index, is 760 pages in length and is an excellent example of sound and faithful Covenanter preaching, balancing both faith (doctrine) and manners (practice). Classic Rutherford!" -- SWRB

Rutherford, Samuel, A Free Disputation Against Pretended Liberty of Conscience, 1649 edition (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books, 1997).
"Rutherford's Free Disputation, though scarce, is still one of his most important works with maybe only a few copies of the actual book left in existence. Though Rutherford is affectionately remembered in our day for his Letters, or for laying the foundations of constitutional government (against the divine right of kings) in his unsurpassed LEX, REX, his Free Disputation should not be overlooked for it contains the same searing insights as Lex, Rex. In fact, this book should probably be known as Rutherford's 'politically incorrect' companion volume to LEX, REX. A sort of sequel aimed at driving pluralists and antinomians insane. Written against 'the Belgick Arminians, Socinians, and other Authors contending for lawlesse liberty, or licentious Tolerations of Sects and Heresies,' Rutherford explains the undiluted Biblical solution to moral relativism, especially as it is expressed in ecclesiastical and civil pluralism! (Corporate pluralism being a violation of the first commandment and an affront to the holy God of Scripture). He also deals with conscience, toleration, penology (punishment), and the judicial laws, as related to both the civil and ecclesiastical realms. Excellent sections are also included which address questions related to determining the fundamentals of religion, how covenants bind us, the perpetual obligation of social covenants (with direct application to the Solemn League and Covenant and the covenant-breaking of Cromwell and his sectarian supporters), whether the punishing of seducing teachers be persecution of conscience, and much more. Walker adds these comments and context regarding Rutherford's Free Disputation, 'The principle of toleration was beginning to be broached in England, and in a modified shape to find acceptance there. Samuel Rutherford was alarmed, or rather, I should say, he was horrified, for he neither feared the face of man or argument. He rushed to the rescue of the good old view . . . It is not so easy to find a theoretical ground for toleration; and Rutherford has many plausible things to say against it. With the most perfect confidence, he argues that it is alike against Scripture and common sense that you should have two religions side by side. It is outrageous ecclesiastically, it is sinful civilly. He does not, however, take what I call the essentially persecuting ground. He does not hold that the magistrate is to punish religion as religion. Nay, he strongly maintains that the civil magistrate never aims at the conscience. The magistrate, he urges, does not send anyone, whether a heretic (who is a soul murderer -- RB) or a murderer, to the scaffold with the idea of producing conversion or other spiritual result, but to strengthen the foundations of civil order. But if he gives so much power to the king, he is no lover of despotism withal: the king himself must be under law. To vindicate this great doctrine is the object of another book, the celebrated LEX, REX; of which it has been said by one competent to judge, that it first clearly developed the constitutionalism which all men now accept' (Theology and Theologians . . ., pp. 11-12). In our day Francis Schaeffer, and numerous others, have critiqued many of the problems found in modern society, but most have spent little time developing explicitly Biblical solutions especially regarding the theoretical foundations that Rutherford addresses here. Rutherford's Free Disputation provides a detailed blueprint for laying the foundations that must be laid before any lasting, God-honoring solutions will be found. Furthermore, Rutherford and his writings were the enemies of all governments not covenanted with Christ. This book will give you a very clear picture as to why "the beast" (civil and ecclesiastical) has reserved his special hatred for such teaching. As Samuel Wylie noted '[t]he dispute, then, will not turn upon the point whether religion should be civilly established . . . but it is concerning whaseligion ought to be civilly established and protected, -- whether the religion of Jesus alone should be countenanced by civil authority, or every blasphemous, heretical, and idolatrous abomination which the subtle malignity of the old serpent and a heart deceitful above all things and desperately wicked, can frame and devise, should be put on an equal footing therewith" (Two Sons of Oil: or, The Faithful Witness For Magistracy and Ministry Upon a Scriptural Basis, softcover). Can our generation swallow RutherfordÕs hard, anti-pluralistic, Covenanter medicine, poured forth from the bottle of the first commandment, without choking on their carnal dreams of a free and righteous society divorced from God (and His absolute claims upon everyone and everything)? Not without the enabling power of the Holy Spirit -- that is for sure! In summary, this book answers all the hardest questions theonomists (and their wisest and best opponents) have been asking for the last 20-30 years (and these answers are much more in depth than any we have seen in the last couple of millennia [less about a century to account for the apostles]). As the reader will discover, Rutherford was a wealthy man when it came to wisdom (and much advanced theologically), and those who take the time to gaze into the King's treasure house, as exhibited in this book, will find that they are greatly rewarded. Furthermore, because of its uncompromising stand upon the Word of God, this book is sure to be unpopular among a wicked and adulterous generation. However, on the other hand, it is sure to be popular among the covenanted servants of King Jesus! This is one of the best books (in the top five anyway) for advanced study of the Christian faith. We have now obtained an easy-to-read, amazingly clear copy of this very rare, old treasure. Great price too, considering that a copy of the 1649 edition, containing this quality of print, would likely cost upwards of $1000 on the rare book market -- though it is unlikely you would ever see a copy for sale!" -- SWRB

Rutherford, Samuel, A Testimony to the Covenanted Work of Reformation Between 1638-1649 in Britain and Ireland (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books, 1997).
"This is Rutherford's dying testimony. It sets forth what he thought most important to communicate in his last earthly words. Rutherford was one of the Scottish commissioners to the Westminster Assembly and has been acknowledged by many Reformed theologians since his time as a theological genius of the first order. Walker said of Rutherford, 'It is not easy to find any one in Church history with whom to compare this remarkable man . . . a man of power, I may say of genius, fresh, bold, penetrating, to whom no subject came amiss, teeming with intellectual energy, distinguished for his learning, but never cumbered by it, the greatest scholastic of our Presbyterian Church, and yet we are told, the plain and faithful preacher, the fieriest of Church leaders and the most devout of saints, equally at home among the tomes of Aquinas, and writing letters to a poor congregation. Altogether a sort of intellectual, theological, religious prodigy!' (THEOLOGY AND THEOLOGIANS OF SCOTLAND 1560-1750, p. 13). Men graced with Rutherford's abilities, intellect and faith come but once or twice a millennium. Augustine, Calvin and Gillespie are others of this class. If you want to know what one of the greats of church history was thinking just before he went to be with the Lord, pick up this item." -- SWRB Mr Rutherford's Testimony to the Covenanted Work of Reformation (From 1638 to 1649), in Britain and Ireland
http://covenanter.org/Rutherfurd/rutherfurdtestimony.htm

Rutherford, Samuel, George Gillespie, et al (compiled by Martin A. Foulner), Theonomy and the Westminster Confession: An Annotated Sourcebook, 1997 (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books).
"A compilation of rare citations taken from Puritans, Covenanters, Reformers and others bearing on questions related to God's law, its application to society and the question of negative civil sanctions. Illustrates, on one hand, where the modern Theonomists agree with the older Reformed writers, but on the other hand, clearly shows where the Reconstructionists have fallen short of the historic testimony given by the best Reformed Divines. A great deal of research has gone into this title and quotations are taken from a number of very rare and hard to find books. Sections from the works of Rutherford and Gillespie alone cover pages 11-26. Durham, Dickson, Ferguson, Brown, the London Covenanters (of the Westminster Assembly), Burroughs, Shields, Jenkyn, Usher, Knox, Luther, Calvin, Bullinger, Bucer, Perkins, Shepard, Ridgeley, Dabney, Thornwell, and a host of others all appear in the useful reference manual." -- SWRB

Rutherford, Samuel, The Trial and Triumph of Faith (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books), EEBO.
"Sermons preached first in Anwoth, and thereafter, in London on the story of the Syrophenician woman. Anyone familiar with Rutherford knows that his work is calculated for great advantage to those who are advanced in the faith. This work was originally published (1645), as Innes writes, in a 'time which those who seek to occupy his (Rutherford's) exact standpoint have always looked back to as not only the one golden age of the Church of Scotland, but as the only time when the world around it seemed prepared to join in its triumph' (adapted from Johnston, TREASURY OF THE SCOTTISH COVENANT, ATLA 1988-6070, p. 306)." -- SWRB
Rutherford, Samuel. The trial and triumph of faith: or, an exposition of the history of Christ's dispossessing of the daughter of the woman of Canaan, delivered in sermons; ... By Samuel Rutherfurd, ... Glasgow, 1743. (ECCO) Gale Document Number CW3321220333

*Scott, David, Distinctive Principles of the Reformed Presbyterian Church (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books, 1841).
"This book is not designed to discuss 'the (many -- RB) doctrines which the Reformed Presbyterian church holds in common will others,' but is written to set forth RP distinctives. It tackles its subject from three major heads: 'Social Covenanting;' 'The Dominion of Christ;' and 'The Universal Application of Scripture (civil as well as religious).' It shows that while these doctrines 'are held by many, as abstract doctrines of divine truth, they are not embodied in the testimony of any other Christian denomination: nor made necessary to ministerial or Christian fellowship. Although other individuals may hold these doctrine, it is a "distinctive" feature of the RPC to embody them in her testimony; and to make them terms of communion.' It also explains how these are the same distinctives that were maintained 'at the era of the reformation (when), the covenanted church of Scotland bore a distinguished testimony for all the offices of Christ, as prophet, priest and king: and for the pure doctrines, worship, discipline, and government of the house of God.' The author states that 'the great object aimed at is to help forward the glorious triumph of the Messiah, so beautifully described in the 72nd Psalm. When "all Kings shall fall down before him; and all nations shall serve him"." -- SWRB

Seaman, Lazarus, d. 1675, The Second and last collection of the late London ministers farewel sermons preached by Dr. Seaman, Dr. Bates, Mr. Caryll, [brace] Mr. Brooks, Mr. Venning, and Mr. Mead ; to which is added a farewell sermon preached at Dedham in Essex by Mr. Matthew Newcomen ; as also Mr. Lyes sermon at the conclusion of the last morning-exercise at All-hallows in Lumbard-street, being a summary rehearsal of the whole monthly-lectures, 1663, EEBO.

*Shaw, J.W., Hephzibah Beulah. Our Covenants the National and Solemn League; and Covenanting by the Reformed Presbyterian Synod in America: Considered (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books, 1872).
"A very useful, easy-to-read, introductory work (by an RPCNA minister) to the topics it deals with. General Scriptural pripciples upon which this book is based are:
"1. Departure from former laudable attainments, is a great evil, severely threatened in the Holy Scriptures; and that for which every one, who is guilty, must be accountable to the Righteous Judge of all the earth.
"2. They who consent unto the unrighteous deeds of others, are chargeable with guilt, as well as the principal actors.
"3. Societies, or individuals, having once publicly and solemnly vowed unto the Most High God; and still, after the strictest enquiry, remain satisfied in their own mind, that their vows were scriptural; should seriously endeavor to act up to the true spirit and intention of these vows; and no power upon earth, nor any class of men, whether majority or minority, in a nation, can ever possibly dissolve the obligation.
"Chapters include: The National Covenant and Solemn League and Covenant reviewed; Their Binding Obligations Shown; The Possibility That Adherence to them May Be Professed, While They are Virtually Abandoned; The Covenant Sworn and Subscribed by Synod at Pittsburgh, May 27th, 1871; Is It a Renovation or a New Covenant?; The Covenant Does Not Contain All That the Church is Bound to in America; Charges Against the Covenant; Reason Why Some Who Do Not Like It, Swear It; The Covenants National and Solemn League Must Be Maintained." -- SWRB

Sibbes, Richard, The Faithful Covenanter, 1639 (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books, 1997), EEBO.
"An amazing sermon opening the narrow road of faithful covenanting -- as seen first and foremost in the Lord Jesus Christ, our perfect covenant keeper! Expounds on the four periods of time relating to the renewing of the covenant of grace in history. Shows that 'whatsoever we give the supremacy of the inward man to, whatsoever we love most, whatsoever we trust most, whatsoever we fear most, whatsoever we joy and delight in most, whatsoever we obey most -- that is our God.' Applies this to the first commandment, as a part of the law of the covenant, and works out the implications (which involve numerous areas). Goes on to give Scriptural marks whereby covenant keepers can be distinguished from covenant breakers and connects the everlasting covenant with the sacraments and their meaning. A meaty meal, recommended for those who are willing to advance theologically and practically." -- SWRB

Simpson, Robert, Traditions of the Covenanters (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books, 1997).
"The design of this collection is to preserve the memory of good men in the inferior ranks of society, whose worth and whose sufferings have not hitherto been recorded. Their names, though those of plain unlettered men, do not deserve to perish; and their posterity may, by contemplating the virtues of their ancestors, be stimulated to emulate their godliness. 504 pages." -- SWRB

Singer, C. Gregg, "John Knox, the Scottish Covenanters, and the Westminster Assembly" (tape 3 of 5 in a series of addresses "History Notes on Presbyterianism, Reformation, and Theology") by Dr. C. Gregg Singer on SermonAudion.com
"Great historical teaching, Singer at his best!" -- SWRB
http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?SID=12607114250
Works of C. Gregg Singer
http://www.lettermen2.com/bcrr3ch.html#cgsinger
"A Theological Interpretation of American History"
http://www.lettermen2.com/bcrr9chc.html#stiahis

Stalker, James, John Knox: His Ideas and Ideals (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books, 1997).
"Published the year before the Quatercentenary 'of the birth of the greatest of Scotsmen,' as Stalker calls Knox, this is an easy-reading look at this great Reformer. Expressing great gratitude for David Laing's 'immortal labours' in editing Knox's Works, and humbly directing the reader to these six volumes 'if he desires to see Knox face to face,' Stalker summarizes his intent, stating, 'I do not pretend to have given a complete collection of Knox's good things; but at least I have creamed them and furnished enough to familiarize the reader not only with his ideas but with the remarkable phraseology in which these were expressed; and my hope is that the following pages may help to make it true that he, being dead, yet speaketh.' For the bibliophiles this item contains a nice chapter summarizing Knox's books and letters." -- SWRB

*Steele, David, Notes on the Apocalypse (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books, 1870).
"In 1779, in their Testimony and Warning Against the Blasphemies and Idolatry of Popery, the Reformed Presbytery called Durham's COMPLETE COMMENTARY... ON THE BOOK OF REVELATION 'the best exposition of that book that has yet been published' (p. 61n). Had they had the privilege of reading Steele's Notes on the Apocalypse we are quite certain that they would have given it a similar endorsement. Though written in a different style than Durham's work, Steele's notes on Revelation may be even more valuable in many respects, Steele having taken a more decided position 'in the wilderness.' Steele also had the benefit of many more resources, having written over two centuries later. Steele's aim in writing this book is made clear in his own words taken from the preface,

As this work is intended for the instruction and edification of the unlearned, rather than for the entertainment of the learned, words of foreign extract are used as seldom as possible. Practical remarks and reflections are rarely introduced; the principal aim being simply to ascertain and present to the reader the mind of the Holy Spirit. How far this object has been accomplished, is of course left to the judgment of the honest inquirer. The reader, however, in forming his judgment of the value of these Notes, may be reminded of that inspired rule in searching the Scriptures, 'Comparing spiritual things with spiritual.' To assist him in the application of this divine rule, many chapters and verses are quoted from other parts of the Bible, but especially within the Apocalypse itself; that by concentrating the various rays upon particular texts or symbols, their intrinsic light may be rendered more luminous. Thus the interpretation given, if correct, may be confirmed and illustrated.
"Appendices include a section on, The New Jerusalem, The Antichrist, The Image of the Beast, The Beast's 'deadly wound,' The Little Book, The Death of the Witnesses, The Mark of the Beast, The First Resurrection, The Identity of the Two Witnesses, Sounding of the Seventh Trumpet and The Title of this Book (i.e. the Book of Revelation -- RB). This work also includes various 'animadversions on the interpretations (of Revelation -- RB) of several among the most learned and approved expositors of Britain and America'."
"Comments on this work include the four given below, all which were given without the solicitation or knowledge of the author. The Evangelical Repository notes,
the author adduces a greater number of Scriptural illustrations than any other writer on prophecy we ever met with.
Hutcheson writes,
I can recommend it to any person as condensing the best thoughts to be had on the subject.
Brooks says,
I have derived more knowledge of the Apocalypse from this work than from all other expositions which I have consulted.
And finally, John Cunningham comments,
It is neither a dictionary nor concordance; neither a confession of faith, nor an encyclopedia, but a thesaurus of Theology, embodying the characters of all these.
"Steele dedicated this work to John Cunningham, author of The Ordinance of Covenanting." -- SWRB
Notes on the Apocalypse, 1870 (only first 11 chapters as of 4/10/99)
http://www.covenanter.org/Steele/Notes/notesontheapocalypse.htm

Serials:

The Contending Witness magazine, Vol. 1:1-2:6, Apr. 1841 to Feb. 1843 (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books, 1997).

The Reformation Advocate magazine, Vol. 1:1-1:12, March 1874 to Dec. 1876 (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books, 1997).

The Origianal Covenanter magazine, Vol. 2:1-2:16, July 1877 to Dec. 1880 (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books, 1997).

The Origianal Covenanter magazine, Vol. 3:1-3:16, March 1881 to Dec. 1884 (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books, 1997).

Stewart, James, Sir, 1635-1715, Jus populi vindicatum, or, The peoples right to defend themselves and their covenanted religion vindicated wherein the act of defence and vindication which was interprised anno 1666 is particularly justified ... being a reply to the first part of Survey of Naphtaly &c. / by a friend to true Christian liberty, 1669, EEBO.

STEWART, JAMES (1635-1713) and JAMES STIRLING (1631-1672?), Naphtali, or The Wrestlings of the Church of Scotland for the Kingdom of Christ, From the Beginning of the Reformation of Religion Unto the Year, 1667: together with the last speeches and testimonies of some who have died for the truth since the year 1660: whereunto also are subjoined, a relation of the sufferings and death of Mr. Hugh McKail, and some instances of the sufferings of Galloway and Nithisdale, 1693 (Still Waters Revival Books), and ( EEBO.)
"Stewart, a Covenanter lawyer and writer, is characterized by Wodrow as 'a great Christian, and an able Statesman, one of the greatest Lawers ever Scotland bred, of universall learning, of vast reading, great and long experience in publick business...' (Analecta II, 205).
"This book is '(t)he product of joint authorship. The first and logical part of this famous covenanting work was executed by Sir James Stewart of Goodtrees; it bears the stamp of a mind of great vigor and grasp. The narrative portion was written by the Rev. James Stirling of Paisley, whose RECOLLECTIONS form an interesting portion of Wodrow's ANALECTA. In 1667 the Council issued a proclamation against NAPHTALI, ordering it to be burned. (Wod., II., 100.) All copies were to be delivered up to the nearest magistrates, and a fine of ten thousand pounds Scots was the penalty inflicted upon any in whose hands the book should afterwards be found. It passed through the flames unscathed only to become dearer than ever to the Scottish hearts . . . and you cannot help admiring the manly sense, spirit, calmness, dignity, and piety which distinguished the sufferers to a degree so equal that you fancy them a band of brothers' (cited in Johnston, TREASURY OF THE SCOTTISH COVENANT, pp. 375-367). A rare old gem of 559 pages." -- SWRB
Stewart, James, Sir. Naphtali; or, a true and short deduction of the wrestlings of the Church of Scotland for the Kingdom of Christ; from the beginning of the Reformation ... unto the year 1667. Together with the last speeches and testimonies of some who have died for the truth since the year 1660. ... Edinburgh, 1761. (ECCO) Gale Document Number CW3321000862

Stevenson, David, The Origins of Freemasonry: Scotland's Century, 1590-1710
"This book traces the early development of modern thought in pre-Union Scotland. It shows clearly that John Napier (1550-1617), the Scots laird and mathematician who invented logarithms and introduced the decimal point in writing numbers, was not a solitary light in the Scotland of wild savages so often portrayed in English historical works. Rather, he was part of a much more broadly based movement of Scots intellectual progress that also included the invention of Freemasonry." -- Reader Comment

Stevenson, David, Revolution and Counter-Revolution in Scotland, 1644-1651

Stevenson, David, Scottish covenanters and Irish confederates: Scottish-Irish relations in the mid-seventeenth century

Stevenson, David, Union, Revolution and Religion in 17th-Century Scotland (Collected Studies, CS570.)
Contains: "III The Early Covenanters and the Federal Union of Britain Scotland and England, 1286-1815, ed. R. Mason. Edinburgh: John Donald Publishers Ltd,
"VII The King's Scottish Revenues and the Covenanters, 1625-1651 Historical Journal 17. Cambridge,
"VIII The Financing of the Cause of the Covenants, 1638-1651 Scottish Historical Review 51. Edinburgh,
"IX The Covenanters and the Court of Session, 1637-1650 Juridical Review. Edinburgh,
"XIII The General Assembley and the Commission of the Kirk, 1638-1651 Records of the Scottish Church History Society Edinburgh,
"XIV Deposition of Ministers in the Church of Scotland under the Covenanters, Church History 44. Chicago, IL, PRINTING
"XV A Revolutionary Regime and the Press: The Scottish Covenanters and their Printers, 1638-1651 The Library, 6th series, London,
"XVI Scotland's First Newspaper, 1648 The Bibiothek. A Scottish Journal of Bibliography and Allied Topics, 10. Edinburgh." -- The Preface

Symington, William, The Westminster Assembly of Divines
http://members.aol.com/RSICHURCH/west1.html

Thomson, James Pringle, Alexander Henderson the Covenanter (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books).
"The period which followed the Union of the Crowns of Scotland and England contains the opening of that contest between Presbytery and Episcopacy, which occupies so much of our history, and some of its most interesting episodes took place between 1618-1646, the years which comprise the active public life of him who is the subject of the following pages. For this reason the life and career of Alexander Henderson must always possess the greatest interest to any student of Scottish history . . . The virtues of the great are apt to be overestimated after they are dead and gone, but there is not one word of exaggeration in the eulogy which Baillie delivered to the General Assembly in 1647, . . . 'That glorious soul of blessed memory, who now is crowned with the reward of all his labours for God and for us, I wish his remembrance may be fragrant among us, so long as free and pure Assemblies remain in this land, which we hope shall be to the coming of the Lord. You know he spent his strength, and wore out his days, he breathed out his life in the service of God and of his Church. This binds it on our back, as we would not prove ungrateful, to pay him his due. If the thoughts of others be conformed to my inmost sense, in duty and reason, he ought to be accounted by us and posterity the fairest ornament, after John Knox, of incomparable memory, that we the Church of Scotland did enjoy' (pp. 5, 158). Henderson had a major hand in the writing of and international subscription to the Solemn League and Covenant. He was also one of the Scottish commissioners to the Westminster Assembly." -- SWRB

Welwood, John, Heartwork, Assurance and National Judgment (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books).
"Although Welwood focuses on personal sanctification, searching out the differences between hypocrites and true believers, he does not leave national issues untouched. He shows how God's anger builds in the life of backsliding individuals, churches and nations and how sometimes faithful individuals are swept away in the deluge that ensues as God's wrath is poured out upon the earth. The situation in Scotland at the time of this sermon (c. 1678) provides a perfect example illustrating this point. The forces of Antichrist (Royalist and Prelatical) were hounding the faithful Covenanters and many were suffering (even unto death) on account of their faithfulness to second Reformation attainments and covenant engagements (in the battle for the crown rights of King Jesus). At this point Welwood seeks to comfort and strengthen those saints suffering under the hand of these wicked, persecuting, 'incarnate devils' -- as Welwood calls them. Occasional hearing, unlawful authorities in church and state and neutrality in the cause of Christ are all sternly rebuked. There is great edification here as this sermon encourages the Christian in his unrelenting battle against sin and defection (individually and in his duties relative to the church and state). This sermon is read (by Ruling Elder Lyndon Dohms) from the book Sermons in Times of Persecution in Scotland, by Suffers for the Royal Prerogatives of Jesus Christ. Regarding the preacher, this arresting account of one of Welwood's last sermons is recounted in Sermons in Times of Persecution." -- SWRB

Wylie, James A., Protestantism in Scotland, 1878, Book 24 (illustrated), from Wylie's THE HISTORY OF PROTESTANTISM (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books, 1997).

Wylie, Samuel B., The Two Sons of Oil; or, the Faithful Witness for Magistracy and Ministry Upon a Scriptural Basis (1850 edition) (Cerlox Bound Photocopy Series. Edmonton, AB, Canada: Still Waters Revival Books, 1995, 1850).
"A Covenanter classic opening Revelation 11:3-4 and Zechariah 4:14. It has been hailed as the 'best presentation of the position of the Covenanter Church that has been written.' Noting that the '[t]ime has been, when the whole body of Presbyterians, in Scotland, England, and Ireland, unanimously subscribed' to these principles, '[f]or civil and ecclesiastical reformation' and that thousands bled and died for the glorious covenanted cause of civil and ecclesiastical reformation; Wylie sets out to explain and defend 'that cause. Not because it is an ancient cause; not because many have sealed it with their blood; but, because,' as he says, 'I thought it the doctrine of the Bible, and the cause of Christ.' This book explains how to tell if a government (especially a civil government) is faithful to Christ and thus to be obeyed for conscience's sake. It also gives direction regarding when and how to resist (and disassociate) yourself from governments which get their power from 'the beast.' Moreover, this book gives clear testimony as to what the Bible requires of civil magistrates, noting 'that civil rulers should exercise their power in protecting and defending the religion of Jesus.' It also gives plain reasons why dissent from the government of the United States (and other covenant breaking nations) is the legitimate Scriptural pattern." -- SWRB
The Two Sons of Oil; or, the Faithful Witness for Magistracy and Ministry Upon a Scriptural Basis, Samuel B. Wylie
http://www.covenanter.org/Wylie/twosonsofoil.htm

See also: The Puritan revolution, Background and history of the Covenanted Reformation of Scotland, The application of scripture to the corporate bodies of church and state, Selection of covenant heads for positions of leadership

Related WebLinks

Mr Rutherford's Testimony to the Covenanted Work of Reformation (From 1638 to 1649), in Britain and Ireland
http://covenanter.org/Rutherfurd/rutherfurdtestimony.htm

Lectures on the Principles of the Second Reformation
http://www.covenanter.org/RPScotland/Principles/lecturesonthesecondreformation.htm

Covenanted Reformed Presbyterian Publications
http://www.truecovenanter.com/publish/

Reformation Eschatology at Still Waters Revival Books
http://www.swrb.com/Puritan/reformation-eschatology.htm

History of The Scottish Nation, 3 volumes, by Rev. J.A. Wylie LL.D.
http://www.reformation.org/history1.html

The Historicism Research Foundation
http://www.historicism.net

The History of the Scottish Church, Edwin Lee
http://www.freechurch.org/lee.html

Religious Principles of the Scottish Martyrs Symington, Andrew
http://www.swrb.com/newslett/actualnls/RelPrinScotMar.htm

The Westminster Assembly of Divines, William Symington (1795-1862)
http://members.aol.com/RSICHURCH/west1.html

The Scottish Covenanting Struggle, Alexander Craighead, and the Mecklenburg Declaration
http://www.lettermen2.com/craig.html

Testimony of the Reformed Presbyterian Church of Ireland
http://www.rpc.org/beliefs/testimony/index.htm

A List of the Banished and Enslaved Presbyterian Christians, A.D. 1678-1688, for the Cause of the Reformation as Attained in the British Isles, A.D. 1638-1650.
http://members.aol.com/Puritanone/banished.html

Among the Martyrs of the Covenants (National and Solemn League), and the Covenanted Reformation
http://members.aol.com/Puritanone/martyrs.html



Chapter 9 (part 3) Related WebLinks

Corporate Faithfulness and Sanctification (part 2)
http://www.lettermen2.com/bcrr9chb.html

The Treasury of David, Psalm 106
http://www.spurgeon.org/treasury/ps106.htm

Books Considered To Be Among the Ten Greatest in the English Language
http://www.lettermen2.com/tengreat.html

Duncan, J. Ligon, III and David W. Hall, The Westminster Assembly: A Guide to Basic Bibliography (Oak Ridge, TN [The Covenant Foundation, 190 Manhattan Avenue, Oak Ridge 37830]: The Covenant Foundation).

How to Find a Book
http://www.lettermen2.com/findbook.html

Reformed Publishers and Booksellers Online
http://www.lettermen2.com/refpub.html

Early English Books Text Creation Partnership
http://www.lib.umich.edu/libhome/eebo/

About Early English Books Online
http://www.columbia.edu/cu/libraries/indexes/eebo.html

Early English Books Online
http://wwwlib.umi.com/eebo/

Ten Best Classics For Advanced Studies From Still Waters Revival Books
http://www.swrb.com/ten-best.htm

Reformation Eschatology at Still Waters Revival Books
http://www.swrb.com/Puritan/reformation-eschatology.htm

Still Waters Revival Books -- Sermons and Books on Audio and Video Cassette
http://www.swrb.com/music/cassets.htm

Bibliography for a course of readings in Reformed Systematic Theology, by Sherman Isbell
http://members.aol.com/RSICHURCH/course.html

The Scottish Covenanting Struggle, Alexander Craighead, and the Mecklenburg Declaration
http://www.lettermen2.com/craig.html

Discipling the Nations
http://www.ismellarat.com/defaultprime.htm

Calvinistic Quotations
http://www.swrb.com/quotes/quotes.htm

Classic Covenanter, Presbyterian, Puritan and Reformed Quotes From Various Authors -- Arranged by Topic
http://www.swrb.com/covqsgb.htm

Classic Covenanter, Presbyterian, Puritan and Reformed Quotes by Topic
http://www.swrb.com/CovQsGB.htm

The Westminster Presbyterian
http://members.aol.com/RSISBELL/church.html

Arminianism/Pelagianism Refutations
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Forum/3505/arminianism_refuted.html

Stephen Downes Guide to the Logical Fallacies
http://www.fallacies.ca/

Fallacy Files
http://www.fallacyfiles.org/

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Table of Contents and Chapter Contents, Biblical Counsel: Resources for Renewal (CD-ROM edition)
http://www.lettermen2.com/toclong.html

Index of Subjects (CD-ROM edition)
http://www.lettermen2.com/subjind.html

Helps: Key, Acronyms, Amazon.com, Google, Permissions, Information for Librarians and Booksellers
http://www.lettermen2.com/help.html

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http://www.lettermen2.com/sliberty.html


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