Chapter 9 (part 2)

Corporate Faithfulness and
Sanctification


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Proclaim liberty throughout all the land unto all the inhabitants thereof. (Leviticus 25:10a)
The inscription on the Liberty Bell.

If ye continue in my word, [then] are ye my disciples indeed; And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you free. -- The Lord Jesus Christ (John 8:31b,32)

If the Son therefore shall make you free, ye shall be free indeed. -- The Lord Jesus Christ (John 8:36)

For other foundation can no man lay than that is laid, which is Jesus Christ. -- (1 Corinthians 3:11)

And the multitudes that went before, and that followed, cried, saying, Hosanna to the son of David: Blessed is he that cometh in the name of the Lord; Hosanna in the highest. (Matthew 21:9)
This was the Lord's public claiming of authority over Israel. He was the son of David, and so He was by natural right the King of the Jews. If He had taken possession of His own, He would have been sitting on the throne of the chosen dynasty of David by right of birth. Also as the Messiah, the Christ, He was the King of His people Israel. Concerning Him it had been said by the prophet, Rejoice greatly, O Daughter of Zion; shout, O daughter of Jerusalem: behold! thy King cometh unto thee: he is just, and having salvation; lowly, and riding upon an ass, and upon a colt the foal of an ass (Zechariah 9:9). Our Lord Jesus literally came to Zion in this way. As King He rode to His capital and entered His palace. In His priestly royalty the Son of God went to His Father's house, to the temple of sacrifice and sovereignty. Among the tribes of Israel He is seen to be One chosen out of the people, whom the Lord had given to be a leader and commander for the people. They might afterwards choose Barabbas and cry that they had no king but Caesar, yet Jesus was their King, as Pilate reminded them when he said, Shall I crucify your king? And also His cross declared, it, bearing the legal inscription, This is Jesus the King of the Jews. Before His trial and condemnation He had put in a public claim to the rights and prerogatives of Zion's king, whom God has set on His holy hill. Would to God all fully recognized our Lord's kingdom, yielding to His sway! Oh, that you would bow before Him, and put your trust in Him! Part of His intent in riding through Jerusalem was that we also who dwell in the isles of the sea might know Him and reverence Him as King of kings and Lord of lords." -- C.H. Spurgeon commenting on Matthew 21:9 in Devotional Classics of C.H. Spurgeon, p. 86

Whereas, we all came into these parts of America with one and the same end and aim, to advance the Kingdom of our Lord Jesus Christ, and to enjoy the liberties of the Gospel in purity and peace. -- The New England Confederation, May 19, 1643

The roots of liberty and limited government are in the Protestant Reformation. We believe the key to the maintenance of liberty and limited government is to be found in the Scottish covenanting struggle. -- James A. Dodson

The question of Paul, Is Christ divided? is one to which professing Christians have not given sufficient heed, and the evil consequences are abundantly apparent.
It was deemed essential to the salvation of men that their Redeemer should possess the powers at once of a prophet, a priest, and a king. These offices, while essentially distinct, are necessarily and inseparably connected with one another. Such a union has been by some utterly denied; and its denial has laid foundation for some capital errors, which have exerted a pernicious influence on the Christian church. By others it has been criminally overlooked; and the neglect with which it has been treated has occasioned vague and conflicting conceptions regarding the great work of man's deliverance from sin and wrath by the mediation of the Son of God.
If, as we presume will be readily admitted, the whole of Christ's offices are necessary to the salvation of fallen man, it follows that they are all essential to the character of the Saviour, and that, of course, we can not suppose him to have existed for a moment without any one of them, as this would suppose him to have been, for the time at least, no Saviour. -- William Symington

Briefly stated, where Christ is demoted or limited, His Kingdom and crown rights are limited and demoted. There is then a shift of sovereignty from God to man, which means the triumph of the state. The state as the new sovereign becomes god walking on earth, and the result is the rapid death of all freedom. -- R.J. Rushdoony

In the final analysis, all modern ills, spiritual and temporal, are traceable to our continuing departure from the principles of the Second Reformation. . . . In particular, I am convinced that the Lord will not bless a church at peace with his enemies. Our departure from truth has led to our undernourished condition as a church; truth, as Thornwell argued, is the only food that the soul can digest.
It does no good to blame society or the church for our deficiencies before the Lord because Christ holds men, not churches and states, accountable. In the words of Hugh Miller, "Churches, however false and detestable, are never to be summoned to the bar of judgment. . . . To Christ, as his head and king, must every man render an account."
The great heresy of our times is that all men are children of God. Those within the church have lost their identity as a people of God, united in spirit and purpose. We have adopted the half-truths of our fathers for which Judah faced punishment: "Because they have despised the law of the Lord, and have not kept his commandments, and their lies caused them to err, after which their fathers have walked" (Amos 2:4b). Nevertheless, Christ loves his church, and he will see to it that his bride is prepared (Ephesians 5:27), for the great banquet. Based on the history of God's people, the needed corrections will result from either prayer or persecution, leading the people to renew their covenant promises. Let us pray that God's kingdom come, and let us covenant to fulfill our obligations to be his people. When persecution comes, let us pray that we would stand as firm as did the Scottish Covenanters. When covenanting comes, let us praise the Lord, for only in him will we stand firm. Let us ever strive to make it possible for our children to utter one of James Nisbet's praises, "O my soul! Bless and praise the Lord that I was born in a land where the glad tidings of the everlasting gospel are published and pressed with so much purity and plainness." This should be our prayer, Turn us again, O God, and cause thy face to shine; and we shall be saved (Psalm 80:3). -- Edwin Nesbit Moore from the conclusion to Our Covenant Heritage: The Covenanters' Struggle for Unity in Truth as Revealed in the Memoir of James Nisbet (1667-1728), and Sermons of John Nevay (d. 1672)

A doctrine once held to be important by early Presbyterians and most Puritans that, today, is largely forgotten and even held in disrepute is social or national covenanting. The Presbyterians of the First and Second Reformation periods of Scotland were so dedicated to socio-religious covenanting as a biblical tool for reformation and solidifying national religious attainments that they came to be called Covenanters. They took seriously Jesus' command to disciple whole nations (cf. Matthew 28:18-20). They believed that this Commission is not fulfilled until every nation bows the knee to Christ and covenants with Him. The Puritans understood that the Bible presents Israel, including its covenant and covenant law code (excluding any laws that have been abrogated or set out of gear by the death of Christ), as a model for all nations (cf. Deuteronomy 4:5-8). The gospel of Jesus Christ is to transform individuals and even whole cultures and nations. It should result in progressive sanctification in society as people learn all that Christ has commanded. When the majority of people are committed to the Lord, they will formally recognize the Redeemer in their constitutions; will establish the true Christian religion on a national and local level; and will seek to base all their laws on the law of God revealed in Scripture.
In the book Rev. Schwertley not only sets forth the biblical case for social or national covenanting in a simple, organized and comprehensive manner, but also critiques the modern Presbyterian alternative to the original Presbyterian teaching on this and related topics. -- Publisher, National Covenanting and Christ's Victory Over the Nations

Ye have seen what I did unto the Egyptians, and how I bare you on eagles' wings, and brought you unto myself. Now therefore, if ye will obey my voice indeed, and keep my covenant, then ye shall be a peculiar treasure unto me above all people: for all the earth is mine: And ye shall be unto me a kingdom of priests, and an holy nation. (Exodus 19:4-6a)
What a loving preface to the law! If anything could have engaged rebellious man to obedience, this would have done it, but, alas, the Lord has nourished and brought up children, and they have rebelled against him. -- C.H. Spurgeon commenting on Exodus 19:4-6a in Spurgeon's Devotional Bible, p. 92


How does a nation protect itself against terrorists who commit suicide to murder innocent citizens?
It is the presence of The Holy Spirit in society, The Third Person of the Holy Trinity -- it is His presence alone, that restrains evil in society. It is His presence alone that stops men from murdering their neighbors and from completely destroying society. See John Owen, God's Presence With a People the Spring of Their Prosperity; With Their Special Interest in Abiding in Him.
In the absence of The Holy Spirit there is no restraint of evil.
Therefore, a nation that struggles to remove The Holy Trinity, The Father, The Son, and The Holy Spirit, from all public life, that nation will lose all restrain of evil, and will succumb to self-destruction from within. It will also succumb to destruction from enemies without. It is the presence in a nation of The Holy One of Israel, The God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, the presence of The Triune God, that restrains evil, and that gives society order and life.
Honored citizens of The United States of America, your willful rebellion against Our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ has brought the judgment of God upon this nation. God punishes a people by putting godless leaders in command. All restraint of evil has disappeared from our nation, and our leaders are helpless to stop the spread of terrorism. Repent honored citizens of this beloved nation, partake of Christ, for you are the terrorists.
And now may the Grace, the Mercy, and the Peace, of God The Father, The Son, and The Holy Spirit, rest and abide with you now and forevermore. Amen.

Therefore was the wrath of the LORD kindled against his people, in so much that he abhorred his own inheritance.
And he gave them into the hands of the heathen; and they that hated them ruled over them.
Their enemies also oppressed them, and they were brought into subjection under their hand.
(Psalm 106:40-42)

The Treasury of David, Psalm 106, commentary by C.H. Spurgeon
Our fathers understood not thy wonders in Egypt. (v. 7)
Nevertheless he saved them for his name's sake, that he might make his mighty power to be known. (v. 8)
And he saved them from the hand of them that hated them. (v. 10)
They soon forgat his works. (v. 13)
And he gave them their request; but sent leanness into their soul. (v. 15)
They made a calf in Horeb, and worshipped the molten image. (v. 19)
Thus they changed their glory into the similitude of an ox that eateth grass. (v. 20)
They forgat God their saviour. (v. 21)
Thus they provoked him to anger with their inventions: and the plague brake in upon them. (v. 29)
Then stood up Phinehas, and executed judgment: and so the plague was stayed. (v. 30)
And that was counted unto him for righteousness unto all generations for evermore. (v. 31)
They did not destroy the nations, concerning whom the LORD commanded them. (v. 34)
But were mingled among the heathen, and learned their works. (v. 35)
Yea, they sacrificed their sons and their daughters unto devils. (v. 37)
Thus were they defiled with their own works, and went a whoring with their own inventions. (v. 39)
Therefore was the wrath of the LORD kindled against his people, in so much that he abhorred his own inheritance. (v. 40)
And he gave them into the hands of the heathen; and they that hated them ruled over them.(v. 41)
Their enemies also oppressed them, and they were brought into subjection under their hand.
(v. 42)
Many times did he deliver them; but they provoked him with their counsel, and were brought low for their iniquity. (v. 43)
Nevertheless he regarded their affliction, when he heard their cry. (v. 44)
And he remembered for them his covenant. (v. 45)
Save us, O Lord our God, and gather us from among the heathen, to give thanks unto thy holy name, and to triumph in thy praise. (v. 47)
Blessed be the Lord God of Israel from everlasting to everlasting: and let all the people say, Amen. Praise ye the Lord. (v. 48)
http://www.spurgeon.org/treasury/ps106.php

Q. What kind of submission may be rendered to immoral and tyrannical governments, the ordinance of Satan, such as now exist?
A. Christians, in the exercise of their Christian liberty, and in the performance of the duty of proving all things, and holding fast what is good, can submit to such governments for wrath's sake, ONLY, which kind of submission has no respect to the power as legitimate authority, but simply, from dread of the cruelty of the tyrant, who pours forth his fury upon all who oppose his misrule. To God's moral ordinance as described, is allegiance due for conscience sake. Submission to this, is submission to God.
Q. When Christians reside under an immoral government, is not conformity to the general order of society a duty, provided this can be done without violating the divine law?
A. If the constituted authorities of a nation are not in voluntary subserviency to the Mediator, but opposed to his authority, law, and religion, for the sake of peace and order, and for the sake of contributing as much as possible to the ease and happiness of society, and from a spirit of resignation to the Divine providence, and in order to make legitimate provision for themselves and relatives, so much conformity to the prevailing system as is consistent with their oath of allegiance to Messiah, is a duty conscientiously to be practiced, although very distinct from that obedience for conscience sake which they would render to the government of their choice, to the authority which has the sanction of the Divine approbation. Jer. xxix. 4-7 [Jeremiah 29:4-7], Seek the peace of the city whither I have caused you to be carried away captives, and pray unto the Lord for it: for in the peace thereof shall ye have peace.
Q. Whilst it is the duty of Christians thus to live a quiet and peaceable life in all godliness and honesty, in conformity to the laws of Christ, which are everywhere, and at all times, obligatory upon them -- is it not their duty publicly to declare their dissent from an immoral constitution of civil government, within the reach of whose power they may reside?
A. This is, indeed, their duty. Because, 1. They are bound to defend God's moral ordinance of civil government, in the purity of which, God's own honor as the Governor of the nations, is deeply involved. Rev. ii. 25,26 [Revelation 2:25,26], That which you have already hold fast till I come; and he that overcometh -- and keepeth my works unto the end -- to him will I give power in the nations, &c. Isa. viii. 16 [Isaiah 8:16], Bind up the testimony, seal the law among my disciples. 2. The purity of this holy ordinance cannot be preserved, if it is confounded with the existing immoral systems, and by an indiscriminate exercise of allegiance. 3. Christians are witnesses for God among men; and having in their possession the testimony of God, in the Holy Scriptures, respecting the true character of civil government, and the duty of national subjection to Christ and his law, and respect for his holy religion, it is their duty to apply the doctrines of inspiration upon this subject, in stating and defending the truth, and condemning the existing immoral systems, and in bearing public testimony against all who uphold them. Isa. xliii. 10 [Isaiah 63:10], Ye are my witnesses, saith the Lord. Rev. xi. 3 [Revelation 11:3], I will give power to my two witnesses, and they shall prophesy a thousand two hundred and three score days, clothed in sackcloth; xii. 17 [Revelation 12:17], And the dragon was wroth with the woman, and went to make war with the remnant of her seed, which keep the commandments of God, and have the testimony of Jesus Christ. See also Rev. xvii. 14 [Revelation 17:14], Acts v. 32 [Acts 5:32], xxvi. 16 [Acts 26:16], Micah iv. 8-18 [Micah 4:8-18], Mark vi. 11 [Mark 6:11]. 4. The witnesses in Revelation are raised up not only to testify against the ecclesiastical apostasy, The scarlet woman, or Roman church -- and the image of the beast, -- the Papacy -- but also against the seven-headed and ten-horned beast -- or the civil powers -- upon which the woman rides. The nations which sustain Antichrist, and are equally, with the man of sin, Anti-christian, and are at war with the Lamb. See passages last quoted, together with Rev. xiii. 1, 2 [Revelation 13:1,2], xvii. 3-14 [Revelation 17:3-14], and xii. 11 [Revelation 12:11], And they overcame him (the devil embodied in the Roman church papacy, and civil powers), by the blood of the Lamb and by the word of their testimony; xvii. 14 [Revelation 17:14], These, (the civil powers), shall make war with the Lamb-and the Lamb shall overcome them: for he is Lord of lords, and King of kings: and they that are with him are called, and chosen, and faithful.
Q. Are not virtuous persons, who, in their private capacity, are endeavoring to further the true end of civil government -- the maintenance of peace and quietness in all godliness and honesty, although they dissent from the constitution of civil government of the nation in which they reside, entitled to protection?
A. They certainly are entitled to protection in their lives, liberties, and property; "but they are not to act inconsistently with their declared dissent, and it would be tyranny to constrain them to such measures." Exod. xxii. 21 [Exodus 22:21], Thou shalt neither vex a stranger nor oppress him. See also Rom. xiii. 3 [Romans 13:3], 1 Tim. ii. 2 [1 Timothy 2:2], Jer. xxi. 12 [Jeremiah 21:12], Esther iii. 8, 9 [Esther 3:8,9].
Q. Should not "Christians, testifying against national evils, and striving, in the use of moral means, to effect a reformation, relinquish temporal privileges, rather than do any thing which may appear to contradict their testimony, or lay a stumbling-block before their weaker brethren?"
A. This is unquestionably their duty. Because they cannot convince men of their own sincerity, and of the immorality of a principle or practice, whilst they themselves are found actually maintaining the immoral principle or practice (by oath of allegiance, voting, and holding offices, &c.), and enjoying the emoluments of iniquity decreed by law. Heb. xi. 24, 26, 36 [Hebrews 11:24,26,36], By faith, Moses, when he was come to years, refused to be called the son of Pharaoh's daughter. Esteeming the reproach of Christ to be greater riches than the treasures in Egypt. And others had trials of cruel mockings and scourgings, yea, moreover, of bonds and imprisonments. Numb. xxiii. 9 [Numbers 23:9], Lo, the people shall dwell alone, and shall not be reckoned among the nations. Rom. xiv. 21 [Romans 14:21], It is good neither to eat flesh, nor drink wine, nor anything whereby thy brother stumbleth, or is offended.
Q. Will not such a public dissent from immoral governments, and faithful testimony against them, ultimately prevail to their overthrow?
A. Yes. By these means the witnesses will prevail, however much they may suffer in the meantime, and will be the honored instruments of establishing the millennial kingdom of the Lamb. Rev. xii. 11 [Revelation 12:11], And they overcame him, by the blood of the Lamb and by the word of their testimony; and they loved not their lives unto the death. Dan. vii. 22 [Daniel 7:22], The Ancient of days came, and judgment was given to the saints of the Most High; and the time came that the saints possessed the kingdom. Rev. xx. 4 [Revelation 20:4], And I saw thrones, and they sat upon them, and judgment was given unto them; and I saw the souls of them that were beheaded for the witness of Jesus, and for the word of God, and which had not worshipped the beast (the civil powers), neither his image (the Papacy), neither had received his mark (yielded allegiance), upon their foreheads, or in their hands; and they lived and reigned with Christ a thousand years." -- William L. Roberts, The Reformed Presbyterian Catechism, pp. 130-133

Traditionally, law was never construed as legalist. It was always construed as a result of covenant. If we can define the word covenant as bond, that lovely four letter word, b-o-n-d, then it's a relationship, it's a solidarity with God or with another person. And from that relationship flows duty. So we can think of convent as that marvelous combination of promise and duty. And so I really see law as a response to a relationship. -- Joseph Kickasola

True, the state as the policeman can be corrupt; in fact, if the society as a whole is corrupt, the state will also be corrupt. In a healthy and godly society, the state will function successfully to restrain the minority of evil-doers. The key to the situation is not the state but the religious health of the society. -- Rousas John Rushdoony, Institutes of Biblical Law, p. 470

If I profess with the loudest voice and clearest exposition every portion of the Word of God except precisely that little point which the world and the devil are at that moment attacking, I am not confessing Christ, however boldly I may be professing Him. Where the battle rages, there the loyalty of the soldier is proven; and to be steady on all the battlefront besides is mere flight and disgrace if he flinches at that point. -- Martin Luther

It is a poor and pitiful kind of knowledge, to know many loose parcels, and broken members of truth, without knowing the whole, or the place and the relations which they have to the rest. To know letters and not syllables, or syllables and not words, or words and not sentences, or sentences and not the scope of the discourse, are all but an unprofitable knowledge. -- Richard Baxter, A Christian Directory, p. 269 (Soli Deo Gloria Publications reprint)



Contents

Church and State
A Theological Interpretation of American History
Background, Foundation, and History of the Covenanted Reformation of Scotland
The Church of Scotland, General Assembly
An Introduction to the Covenanted Reformation
The Puritan Revolution
Sermons Preached Before Governing Bodies
The Reformed Presbytery of Scotland, The Reformed Presbytery of America, and Other Smaller Reformed Associations
Covenant Theology and the Ordinance of Covenanting
The Mediatorial Reign of Christ and the Crown Rights of Christ
Male Role and Responsibility, Gender Equality, Suffrage, Reproductive Rights, and the Decline of American Society
A Partial Timeline of US History Showing how Liberalization in the Church and Liberalization in the State, has Been Paralleled by Advances in the Feminist Movement, and the Overall Decline of American Society
Theodicy
The Question of the One and the Many
Confession of National Sin and Covenant Renewal
Servant Leadership
Selection of Covenant Heads for Positions of Leadership
Resolutions
The Right to Petition
Referendum Votes
Bible Magistracy Turns Back the Wrath of God
The Doctrine of the Lesser Magistrates
The Government Role of Punishing Wrongdoers
Toleration, Liberty of Conscience, Pluralism, and Neutrality
Unity and Uniformity in the Visible Church: Unity in the Truth
National Establishment of Religion: Establishmentarianism
The Westminster Confession of Faith (1646, approved 1647) Westminster Standards and Related Works Chapter 9 (part 2) Related WebLinks

Contents: Chapter 9, "Corporate Faithfulness and Sanctification" (parts 1, 2, 3, and 4), interactive
http://www.lettermen2.com/bcrr9cha.html#index9

Combined Interactive Contents for The Web Edition of Biblical Counsel: Resources for Renewal
http://www.lettermen2.com/combtoc.html




Chapter 9 (part 2)

Corporate Faithfulness and Sanctification


Church and State

In the history of the church-state relationship, two major errors have developed: Papalism and Erastianism. The former teaches that the church (i.e., the Pope), is to rule both church and state. The latter maintains that both institutions are under the headship of the civil magistrate. Calvin disavows both. "Biblical Christianity, says the Reformer, teaches that these two are separate God-ordained institutions, while at the same time they are both under his law (i.e., there is a separation in function, but not in authority [emphasis added]). In Romans 13:1-7, we read that civil rulers are God's ministers. Thus, it is incumbent upon civil magistrates to adopt the principles of civil law, i.e., The Ten Commandments and the general equity of the Mosaic judicials, as found in Scripture. Likewise, the church is to be governed by Scriptural ecclesiastical law. The church wields only the sword of the Spirit in dealing with sin, whereas the state wields the sword of iron in accordance with Scripture, in dealing with crime. The state is not to administer the Word of God or the sacraments. It has no authority over the keys of the Kingdom. And the church is not to enter into the affairs of the civil government, other than for advice and counsel (Institutes IV:11:3; 20:1-13; Commentary on Romans 13:1-7). -- W. Gary Crampton in What Calvin Says

A truth not generally known is that the ancient Biblical covenant was the taproot from which America, its constitution, its law, and its liberty grew. That ancient Biblical covenant was the solemn agreement, an everlasting mutual agreement between God and man and between man and God. God promised man great blessings, freedom and prosperity, providing man kept the conditions of the covenant -- conditions defined by God's law. -- Charles Hull Wolfe

To [James] Thornwell, the real issue is not the relation between states and the church, but the relation between states and Christ. Although Thornwell opposed the establishment of a single denomination over another, he clearly supported a Christian government: "The state realizes its religious character through the religious character of its subjects; and a state is and ought to be Christian, because all its subjects are and ought to be determined by the principles of the gospel." [Thornwell, "National Sins," p. 517]. To this point, states must acknowledge Jesus Christ. Thornwell insisted that it is not enough for a state "to acknowledge in general terms the supremacy of God; it must also acknowledge in general terms the supremacy of His Son." Jesus "is the ruler of the nations, the King of kings, and the Lord of lords." [Thornwell, "Relation of the State to Christ," p. 554]. Thornwell argued that "religion of the state is embodied in its constitution," and that it is legitimate for the state to have a religion (i.e., Christianity). Neutrality is impossible. . . . Further, the state must mold its institutions in conformance with Christian principles.
Although Thornwell sought less protection of the church than did the Covenanters, their beliefs regarding this topic are not inconsistent. They both held the state accountable as a moral agent to recognize Christ as king and to protect Christianity. Thornwell, like Christ, focused his attack on the false church, not the errant state, for Christ's zeal is for the house of the Lord. Exclusively attacking the externals of civil society was not the way of our Lord when on this earth; however, his silence is not an endorsement.
Thornwell contended that the gospel is the only solution for the state. Therefore, Christians should avoid conflicts that distract from the primary object of Christianity. The power of the gospel is the only force that can change the inner man and eventually transform the outer world. These changes can only take place in the context of the church, and reformation must begin with God's people. -- Edwin Nesbit Moore from the conclusion to Our Covenant Heritage: The Covenanters' Struggle for Unity in Truth as Revealed in the Memoir of James Nisbet (1667-1728), and Sermons of John Nevay (d. 1672), p. 351

The Relation of the State to Christ, James Henley Thornwell
"The Constitution of the United States was an attempt to realize the notion of popular freedom, without the checks of aristocracy and a throne, and without the alliance of a national church. The conception was a noble one, but the execution was not commensurate with the design. The fundamental error of our fathers was, that they accepted a partial for a complete statement of the truth. They saw clearly the human side -- that popular governments are the offspring of popular will; and that rulers, as the servants and not the masters of their subjects, are properly responsible to them. They failed to apprehend the Divine side -- that all just government is the ordinance of God, and that magistrates are His ministers who must answer to Him for the execution of their trust. The consequence of this failure, and of exclusive attention to a single aspect of the case, was to invest the people with a species of supremacy as insulting to God as it was injurious to them. They became a law unto themselves; there was nothing beyond them to check or control their caprices or their pleasure. All were accountable to them; they were accountable to none. This was certainly to make the people a God; and if it was not explicitly expressed that they could do no wrong, it was certainly implied that there was no tribunal to take cognizance of their acts. A foundation was thus laid for the worst of all possible forms of government -- a democratic absolutism, which, in the execution of its purposes, does not scruple to annul the most solemn compacts and to cancel the most sacred obligations. The will of majorities must become the supreme law, if the voice of the people is to be regarded as the voice of God; if they are, in fact, the only God whom rulers are bound to obey. It is enough, therefore, to look upon government as simply the institute of man. Important as this aspect of the subject unquestionably is, yet if we stop there, we shall sow the seeds of disaster and failure. We must contemplate people and rulers as alike subject to the authority of God. His will is the true supreme; and it is under Him, and as the means of expressing His sovereign pleasure, that conventions are called, constitutions are framed and governments erected. To the extent that the State is a moral person, it must needs be under moral obligation, and moral obligation without reference to a superior will is a flat contradiction in terms. If, then, the State is an ordinance of God, it should acknowledge the fact. If it exists under the conditions of a law superior to all human decrees, and to which all human decrees behoove to be conformed, that law should be distinctly recognized. Let us guard, in this new Confederacy, against the fatal delusion that our government is a mere expression of human will. It is, indeed, an expression of will, but of will regulated and measured by those eternal principles of right which stamp it at the same time as the creature and institute of God. And of all governments in the world, a confederate government, resting as it does upon plighted faith, can least afford to dispense with the Supreme Guardian of treaties.
"Your honourable body has already, to some extent, rectified the error of the old Constitution, but not so distinctly and clearly as the Christian people of these States desire to see done. We venture respectfully to suggest, that it is not enough for a State which enjoys the light of Divine revelation to acknowledge in general terms the supremacy of God; it must also acknowledge the supremacy of His Son, whom He hath appointed heir of all things, by whom also He made the worlds. To Jesus Christ all power in heaven and earth is committed. To Him every knee shall bow, and every tongue confess. He is the Ruler of the nations, the King of kings, and Lord of lords.
"Should it be said that the subjection of governments to Jesus Christ is not a relation manifested by reason, and therefore not obligatory on the State, the answer is obvious -- that duties spring not from the manner in which the relation is made known, but from the truth of the relation itself. If the fact is so, that Jesus Christ is our Lord, and we know the fact, no matter how we come to know it, we are bound to acknowledge it, and act upon it. A father is entitled to the reverence of his son, a master to the obedience of his servant, and a king to the allegiance of his subjects, no matter how the relation between them is ascertained. Now, that Jesus Christ is the supreme Ruler of the nations, we know with infallible certainty, if we accept the Scriptures as the Word of God.
"But it may be asked -- and this is the core of all the perplexity which attends the subject -- Has the State any right to accept the Scriptures as the Word of God? The answer requires a distinction, and that distinction seems to us to obviate all difficulty. If by 'accepting the Scriptures' it is meant that the State has a right to prescribe them as a rule of faith and practice to its subjects, the answer must be in the negative. The State is lord of no man's conscience. As long as he preserves the peace, and is not injurious to the public welfare, no human power has a right to control his opinion or to restrain his acts. In these matters he is responsible to none but God. He may be Atheist, Deist, infidel, Turk or Pagan: it is no concern of the State, so long as he walks orderly. Its protecting shield must be over him, as over every other citizen. We utterly abhor the doctrine that the civil magistrate has any jurisdiction in the domain of religion, in its relations to the conscience or conduct of others, and we cordially approve the clause in our Confederate Constitution which guarantees the amplest liberty on this subject.
"But if by 'accepting the Scriptures' it is meant that the State may itself believe them to be true, and regulate its own conduct and legislation in conformity with their teachings, the answer must be in the affirmative. As a moral person, it has a conscience as really and truly as every individual citizen. To say that its conscience is only the aggregate of individual consciences, is to say that it is made up of conflicting and even contradictory elements. The State condemns many things which many of its subjects approve, and enjoins many things which many of its subjects condemn. There are those who are opposed to the rights of property and the institution of marriage, yet the public conscience sanctions and protects them both. What, then, is this public conscience? It is clearly the sum of those convictions of right, that sense of the honourable, just and true, which legislators feel themselves bound to obey in the structure of governments and the enactment of laws. It is a reflection of the law of God; and when that law is enunciated with authoritative clearness, as it is in the Scriptures, it becomes only the more solemnly imperative. And as the eternal rule of justice, the State should acknowledge it. Considered in its organic capacity as a person, it no more violates the rights of others in submitting itself to the revealed will of God, than a Christian, when he worships the supreme Jehovah, violates the rights of an Atheist or idolater. What the State does itself, and what it enjoins upon others to do, are very different things. It has an organic life apart from the aggregate life of the individuals who comprise it; and in that organic life, it is under the authority of Jesus Christ and the restraints of His holy Word.
"That, in recognizing this doctrine, the State runs no risk of trespassing upon the rights of conscience is obvious from another point of view. The will of God, as revealed in the Scriptures, is not a positive constitution for the State; in that relation it stands only to the Church. It is rather a negative check upon its power. It does not prescribe the things to be done, but only forbids the things to be avoided. It only conditions and restrains the discretion of rulers within the bounds of the Divine law. It is, in other words, a limitation, and not a definition, of power. The formula according to which the Scriptures are accepted by the State is: Nothing shall be done which they forbid. The formula according to which they are accepted by the Church is: Nothing shall be done but what they enjoin. They are here the positive measure of power. Surely the government of no Christian people can scruple to accept the negative limitations of the Divine Word. Surely, our rulers do not desire that they shall have the liberty of being wiser than God.
"The amendment which we desire, we crave your honourable body to take note, does not confine the administration of the State exclusively to the hands of Christian men. A Jew might be our Chief Magistrate, provided he would come under the obligation to do nothing in the office inconsistent with the Christian religion. He would not be required to say that he himself believes it, nor would he assume the slightest obligation to propagate or enforce it. All that he would do would be to acknowledge it as the religion of the State, and to bind himself that he will sanction no legislation that sets aside its authority. The religion of the State is one thing; the religion of the individuals who may happen to be at the head of affairs is quite another. The religion of the State is embodied in its constitution, as the concrete form of its organic life.
"Your honourable body will perceive that the contemplated measure has no reference to a union or alliance betwixt the Church and State. To any such scheme the Presbyterians, and, we think we can safely venture to say, the entire Christian people of these States, are utterly opposed. The State, as such cannot be a member, much less, therefore, can it exercise the function of settling the creed and the government, of a Church. The provinces of the two are entirely distinct: they differ in their origin, their nature, their ends, their prerogatives, their powers and their sanctions. They cannot be mixed or confounded without injury to both. But the separation of Church and State is a very different thing from the separation of religion and the State. Here is where our fathers erred. In their anxiety to guard against the evils of a religious establishment, and to preserve the provinces of Church and State separate and distinct, they virtually expelled Jehovah from the government of the country, and left the State an irresponsible corporation, or responsible only to the immediate corporators. They made it a moral person, and yet not accountable to the Source of all law. It is this anomaly which we desire to see removed; and the removal of it by no means implies a single element of what is involved in a national Church.
"The amendment which this General Assembly ventures respectfully to crave we have reason to believe is earnestly desired, and would be hailed as an auspicious omen by the overwhelming majority of the Christian people of these Confederate States. Is it not due to them that their consciences, in the future legislation of the country, should be protected from all that has a tendency to wound or grieve them? They ask no encroachments upon the rights of others. They simply crave that a country which they love should be made much dearer to them, and that the Government which they have helped to frame they may confidently commend to their Saviour and their God, under the cheering promise that those who honour Him He will honour. Promotion cometh not from the East, nor from the West, nor from the South. God is the ruler among the nations; and the people who refuse Him their allegiance shall be broken with a rod of iron, or dashed in pieces like a potter's vessel. Our Republic will perish like the Pagan republics of Greece and Rome, unless we baptize it into the name of Christ. "Be wise now therefore, O ye kings: be instructed, ye judges of the earth . . . Kiss the Son, lest he be angry, and ye perish from the way, when his wrath is kindled but a little." We long to see, what the world has never yet beheld, a truly Christian Republic, and we humbly hope that God has reserved it for the people of these Confederate States to realize the grand and glorious idea. God has wooed us by extraordinary goodness; He is now tempering us by gentle chastisements. Let the issue be the penitent submission of this great people at the footstool of His Son.
"The whole substance of what we desire may be expressed in the following or equivalent terms, to be added to the section providing for liberty of conscience:
"Nevertheless we, the people of these Confederate States, distinctly acknowledge our responsibility to God, and the supremacy of His Son, Jesus Christ, as King of kings and Lord of lords; and hereby ordain that no law shall be passed by the Congress of these Confederate States inconsistent with the will of God, as revealed in the Holy Scriptures." -- James Henley Thornwell, "Relation of the State to Christ (A Memorial)," The Collected Works of James Henley Thornwell, Vol. IV: Ecclesiastical, pp. 549-56. Edited by B.M. Palmer, 1875; reprint edition, Edinburgh: The Banner of Truth Trust, 1986

For he is the minister of God to thee for good. But if thou do that which is evil, be afraid; for he beareth not the sword in vain; for he is the minister of God, a revenger to execute wrath upon him that doeth evil. (Romans 13:4)

On the contrary, he charges them with gross and voluntary ignorance, as if he had said that, by their madness, they brought down destruction on themselves. The meaning therefore is, that the people perished because they despised instruction . . . .
Hence we draw a useful doctrine; namely, that the source of all our calamities is, that we do not allow ourselves to be taught by the word of God, and this is what the Prophet chiefly intended that we should observe. . . .
So then it is a true statement, that the reason why the people endure such a variety of afflictions is, that they are ignorant of God, and will not allow themselves to be taught by him. -- John Calvin commenting on Isaiah 5:13

The Erastian Revolution, anno 1689, was "utterly inconsistent with the covenanted constitution of the Reformed Church of Scotland, anno 1648."
In fact, the relationship between Church and State has been in decline since 1661. "In early 1661 . . . the Scottish Parliament passed the Act Rescissory, which established the king as supreme judge in all matters civil and ecclesiastical, and which made owning the covenants [National and Solemn League], unlawful. These acts undid all the works of Reformation from 1638 to 1650 and made it high treason to acknowledge Jesus Christ as head of the church. . . ." See: ACT, DECLARATION, AND TESTIMONY, 1876, Part II.

The whole of the prophecies of Isaiah are precious, and should be read by us constantly in private. -- C.H. Spurgeon, Spurgeon's Devotional Bible

See Isaiah 40:1 -- Isaiah 55:13 and annotations in The Reformation Study Bible.

The priests said not, Where is the LORD? and they that handle the law knew me not: the pastors also transgressed against me, and the prophets prophesied by Baal, and walked after things that do not profit. (Jeremiah 2:8)

See the Theological Notes, "God Reigns: Divine Sovereignty," at Daniel 4:34 in The Reformation Study Bible.

We content ourselves in the only word of God; and do therefore simply believe and teach, that God by his providence doth govern all things. -- Heinrich Bullinger (1504-1575)

The four "Servant Songs" of Isaiah are Isaiah 42:1-9; Isaiah 49:1-7; Isaiah 50:4-11; and Isaiah 52:13 -- Isaiah 53:12. See the annotations in The Reformation Study Bible.

Our Triune God has ordained that the preeminent leader of the Church is the Lord Jesus Christ, the God Man, Our Righteousness. (John 1:1-18; Matthew 19:30; Matthew 28:18-20; Isaiah 49:7; Colossians 1:16-19; Colossians 2:9,10; Hebrews 12:1,2; Revelation 5:1-14; Revelation 19:11-15; Revelation 20:11-15; Revelation 22:12, and so forth, and so on). Human leadership is also divinely ordained and tends to devolve to those who are most perfectly at one with Christ, and to those who also know the most Truth (the Apostle Paul, Saint Augustine, Martin Luther, John Calvin, Puritan leaders, The Scots Worthies, and so forth, and so on.)
And Jesus said unto them, Verily I say unto you, That ye which have followed me, in the regeneration when the Son of man shall sit in the throne of his glory, ye also shall sit upon twelve thrones, judging the twelve tribes of Israel. -- The Lord Jesus Christ (Matthew 19:28). See: (Matthew 19:28, 1599 Geneva Bible)
Then his master said unto him, It is well done good servant and faithful, Thou hast been faithful in little, I will make thee ruler over much: enter into thy master's joy. -- The Lord Jesus Christ (Matthew 25:21 1599 Geneva Bible)
Then shall the King say unto them on his right hand, Come, ye blessed of my Father, inherit the kingdom prepared for you from the foundation of the world. -- The Lord Jesus Christ (Matthew 25:34). See: (Matthew 25:34, 1599 Geneva Bible)
And he said unto him, Well, good servant: because thou hast been faithful in a very little thing, take thou authority over ten cities. -- The Lord Jesus Christ (Luke 19:17, 1599 Geneva Bible)
Therefore I appoint unto you a kingdom, as my Father hath appointed unto me. -- The Lord Jesus Christ (Luke 22:29, 1599 Geneva Bible)
And if children, then heirs; heirs of God, and joint-heirs with Christ; if so be that we suffer with him, that we may be also glorified together. (Romans 8:17). See: (Romans 8:17, 1599 Geneva Bible)
Know ye not that we shall judge angels? how much more things that pertain to this life? (1 Corinthians 6:3). See: (1 Corinthians 6:3, 1599 Geneva Bible)
And hath raised us up together, and made us sit together in heavenly places in Christ Jesus. (Ephesians 2:6). See: (Ephesians 2:6, 1599 Geneva Bible)
To execute vengeance upon the heathen, and corrections among the people:
To bind their kings in chains, and their nobles with fetters of iron,
That they may execute upon them the judgment that is written: this honor shall be to all his Saints. Praise ye the Lord.
(Psalm 149:7-9, 1599 Geneva Bible)
But I suffer not a woman to teach, nor to usurp authority over the man, but to be in silence. (1 Timothy 2:12), (1 Timothy 2:12, 1599 Geneva Bible)
And he that overcometh, and keepeth my works unto the end, to him will I give power over the nations. -- The Lord Jesus Christ (Revelation 2:26). See: (Revelation 2:26, 1599 Geneva Bible)
To serve God is to reign. -- Seneca (4 BC -- 65 AD)

The question of Paul, Is Christ divided? is one to which professing Christians have not given sufficient heed, and the evil consequences are abundantly apparent.
It was deemed essential to the salvation of men that their Redeemer should possess the powers at once of a prophet, a priest, and a king. These offices, while essentially distinct, are necessarily and inseparably connected with one another. Such a union has been by some utterly denied; and its denial has laid foundation for some capital errors, which have exerted a pernicious influence on the Christian church. By others it has been criminally overlooked; and the neglect with which it has been treated has occasioned vague and conflicting conceptions regarding the great work of man's deliverance from sin and wrath by the mediation of the Son of God.
If, as we presume will be readily admitted, the whole of Christ's offices are necessary to the salvation of fallen man, it follows that they are all essential to the character of the Saviour, and that, of course, we can not suppose him to have existed for a moment without any one of them, as this would suppose him to have been, for the time at least, no Saviour. -- William Symington

Then all the elders of Israel gathered themselves together, and came to Samuel unto Ramah, And said unto him, Behold, thou art old, and thy sons walk not in thy ways: now make us a king to judge us like all the nations. But the thing displeased Samuel, when they said, Give us a king to judge us. And Samuel prayed unto the LORD. And the LORD said unto Samuel, Hearken unto the voice of the people in all that they say unto thee: for they have not rejected thee, but they have rejected me, that I should not reign over them. According to all the works which they have done since the day that I brought them up out of Egypt even unto this day, wherewith they have forsaken me, and served other gods, so do they also unto thee. Now therefore hearken unto their voice: howbeit yet protest solemnly unto them, and shew them the manner of the king that shall reign over them. And Samuel told all the words of the LORD unto the people that asked of him a king. And he said, This will be the manner of the king that shall reign over you: He will take your sons, and appoint them for himself, for his chariots, and to be his horsemen; and some shall run before his chariots. And he will appoint him captains over thousands, and captains over fifties; and will set them to ear his ground, and to reap his harvest, and to make his instruments of war, and instruments of his chariots. And he will take your daughters to be confectionaries, and to be cooks, and to be bakers. And he will take your fields, and your vineyards, and your oliveyards, even the best of them, and give them to his servants. And he will take the tenth of your seed, and of your vineyards, and give to his officers, and to his servants. And he will take your menservants, and your maidservants, and your goodliest young men, and your asses, and put them to his work. He will take the tenth of your sheep: and ye shall be his servants. And ye shall cry out in that day because of your king which ye shall have chosen you; and the LORD will not hear you in that day. Nevertheless the people refused to obey the voice of Samuel; and they said, Nay; but we will have a king over us; That we also may be like all the nations; and that our king may judge us, and go out before us, and fight our battles. And Samuel heard all the words of the people, and he rehearsed them in the ears of the LORD. And the LORD said to Samuel, Hearken unto their voice, and make them a king. And Samuel said unto the men of Israel, Go ye every man unto his city. (1 Samuel 8:4-22)

The Supremacy Act was 1534 under Henry VIII. Act of Supremacy? "The first Act of Supremacy granted King Henry VIII of England Royal Supremacy which is still the legal authority of the Sovereign of the United Kingdom. Royal Supremacy is specifically used to describe the legal sovereignty of the civil laws over the laws of the Church in England." -- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Act_of_Supremacy

They [the Scottish Parliament], passed an act rescissory [The Act Rescissory of 1661], declaring all the parliaments, and acts of parliament made in favor of reformation, from the year 1640 to 1651, null and void. The king's supremacy over all persons, and in all causes, is asserted. All meeting's, assemblies, leagues and covenants, without the king's authority, are declared unlawful and unwarrantable. The renewing of the solemn league and covenant, or any other covenants or public oaths, without the king's special warrant and approbation, is discharged. -- ACT, DECLARATION AND TESTIMONY. PART I. PLOUGHLANDHEAD, June 6, 1761

The Erastian Revolution, anno 1689, was "utterly inconsistent with the covenanted constitution of the Reformed Church of Scotland, anno 1648."
In fact, the relationship between Church and State has been in decline since 1661. "In early 1661 . . . the Scottish Parliament passed the Act Rescissory, which established the king as supreme judge in all matters civil and ecclesiastical, and which made owning the covenants [National and Solemn League], unlawful. These acts undid all the works of Reformation from 1638 to 1650 and made it high treason to acknowledge Jesus Christ as head of the church. . . ." -- Act, Declaration, And Testimony, 1876, Part II.
The roots of liberty and limited government are in the Protestant Reformation. We believe the key to the maintenance of liberty and limited government is to be found in the Scottish covenanting struggle. -- James A. Dodson
Act, Declaration, and Testimony (1876)
https://archive.org/details/actdeclarationte00refo
The Covenanted Reformation of Scotland Author/Title Listing
http://www.lettermen2.com/bcrr9chb.html#crsstl

Another turning point occurred in 1758 with the reunion of the Old Side and the New Side of American Presbyterian Church. "This signaled the end of the influence of Calvinism in American Politics." For a detailed discussion see:
From Old School to New School in CROSSED FINGERS: HOW THE LIBERALS CAPTURED THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, by Gary North
http://entrewave.com/freebooks/docs/html/gncf/Chapter02.htm
Another turning point occurred in 1789 with the adoption of the American Version of the Westminster Confession of Faith.

In the same establishment may be found believers in nearly every dogma of the Popish creed, who nevertheless have declared their faith in articles which are distinctly Calvinistic; and now last, and, to our minds, most sorrowful of all, it comes out that there are men to be found among Caledonia's once sternly truthful sons who can occupy the pulpits and the manses of an orthodox Presbyterian church, and yet oppose her ancient confession of faith. Our complaint is in each case, not that the men changed their views, and threw up their former creeds, but that having done so they did not at once quit the office of minister to the community whose faith they could no longer uphold; their fault is not that they differed, but that, differing, they sought an office of which the prime necessity is agreement. All the elements of the lowest kind of knavery meet in the evil which we now denounce. Treachery is never more treacherous than when it leads a man to stab at a doctrine which he has solemnly engaged to uphold, and for the maintenance of which he receives a livelihood. The office of minister would never wittingly be entrusted by any community to a person who would use it for the overthrow of the principles upon which the community was founded. Such conduct would be suicidal. A sincere belief of the church's creed was avowedly or by implication a part of the qualification which helped the preacher to his stipend, and when that qualification ceases the most vital point of the compact between him and his church is infringed, and he is bound in honor to relinquish an office which he can no longer honestly fulfill." -- Charles Spurgeon in "Ministers Sailing Under False Colours," Sword and Trowel, February, 1870, quoted by John W. Robbins, February 10, 2006

The Biblical doctrine of Christian Magistracy functions correctly only when State leadership is Christian, and when the State can be depended upon to wield their sword to protect true religion. The history of the human depravity in State leadership (secular leaders who destroy true religion instead of protecting it), should not cause theologians to abandon sound doctrine as stated in the original WESTMINSTER CONFESSION OF FAITH (1646). Treachery in State leadership would be far less of a problem if the writers of the US Constitution had not removed the religious test clause of Colonial constitutions. This was done in America with the adoption of the "AMERICAN VERSION" OF THE WESTMINSTER CONFESSION OF FAITH and THE U.S. CONSTITUTION in 1789.
Besides arguing in support of the "AMERICAN VERSION" OF THE WESTMINSTER CONFESSION "he [Charles Hodge], repudiated the unhistorical position of those who denied the validity of Roman Catholic baptism . . . Hodge supported slavery in the 1830s, and while he condemned the mistreatment of slaves he did not condemn the institution of slavery itself. The background to this attitude, however, was not primarily his understanding of the Bible's teaching on the matter, but rather his churchmanship. . . .
"In 1846, however, he became convinced that slavery was wrong, reversing his earlier anti-abolitionist stance, and he then publicly denounced slavery and supported both the Abolitionist movement and President Lincoln (Adams, 2003)." -- http://www.newworldencyclopedia.org/entry/Charles_Hodge, February 15, 2014
American Covenanters decried the "American Version." See the Covenanter document:
Reformed Presbyterian Catechism, William L. Roberts D.D.
http://archive.org/details/ReformedPresbyterianCatechism
We love Gordon Clark, and we hold him in highest esteem, one of the great minds of the 20th Century. However, astonishingly, he seems to have adopted Hodge's position on the "American Version." This relieves the State of judicial responsibilities to preserve true religion, and delivers the Church into the hands of the State. Hence, today we have the "church effeminate" and, consequently, a destabilization of every sphere of society, including that of the Reformed Church. Could this be one reason for the failure of Church courts today?
Church and State, Charles Hodge
http://www.trinityfoundation.org/journal.php?id=92
In "The Reformed Faith and the Westminster Confession," an address given at Weaverville, NC, August 17, 1955, found in the Appendix to this work [WHAT DO PRESBYTERIANS BELIEVE?], Clark eloquently extols the virtues of the Westminster Confession of Faith and condemns neo-orthodoxy for departing from the Word of God found in the Bible.
Yet, incredibly, one year later, in 1956, he published this work, [WHAT DO PRESBYTERIANS BELIEVE?], which is a commentary on the "American Version (1789)." To more fully understand Clark's error here and the consequences of such an error see:
The Topical Listing "A Theological Interpretation of American History"
http://www.lettermen2.com/bcrr9chc.html#stiahis

Many scholars consider alterations to the Westminster Confession of Faith (1646), originally compiled by the Westminster Assembly of Divines, to be a "reverse plagiarism," an alteration of the original document by someone beside the author, and then passed off to the public, under the original title, as the work of the original authors. Plagiarize: to steal and pass off (the ideas or words of another), as one's own use (a created production), without crediting the source; to commit literary theft: present as new and original an idea or product derived from an existing source. (Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary)
Revisers have altered the content of the original WCF (1646), have removed key doctrine related to Christ's Crown and Covenant, and yet have retained the name given by the Westminster Assembly. Consequently, revisers have deceived many in the Church into believing that their alterations are the work of the Westminster Assembly of Divines in 1646.
Most Presbyterian and Reformed denominations and seminaries today prescribe to the Westminster Confession of Faith (1789), the "American Version." Included are The Presbyterian Church in America and the newly constituted Evangelical Reformed Presbyterian Church.
Ideas have consequences. Because theology is truth, when men delete or alter key doctrines, or replace sound doctrine deducted from God's infallible Word by logic, with human imaginations, then the course of history is changed.
For a detailed analysis of the devastating consequences to American history caused by non-Biblical alterations in the Westminster Confession of Faith (1646) and non-Biblical alterations to constitutional government in the United States see the following:
The Topical Listing "A Theological Interpretation of American History"
http://www.lettermen2.com/bcrr9chc.html#stiahis
In Great Britain the Independents and Calvinistic Baptists edited the Westminster Confession (1646) for their own use, but they gave the new confessions a different name, the Savoy Declaration and the Baptist Confession. Certainly this was the honest procedure.
American Revisions to the Westminster Confession of Faith (1789)
http://www.opc.org/documents/WCF_orig.html
Appendix A: Major Changes of the Savoy Declaration
http://www.bible-researcher.com/wescoappa.html
Appendix B: Major Changes of the PCUSA (1788-1958)
http://www.bible-researcher.com/wescoappb.html
Appendix C: Major Changes of the UPCUSA and PCUS (1958-1983)
http://www.bible-researcher.com/wescoappc.html

In 1788 the U.S. Constitution and the revised Westminster Confession were ratified. For a detailed discussion see:
From Old School to New School in CROSSED FINGERS: HOW THE LIBERALS CAPTURED THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, by Gary North
http://entrewave.com/freebooks/docs/html/gncf/Chapter03.htm

Unfortunately these revisions (see listing of revisions to the Westminster Confession of Faith (1646) above and under "The Westminster Confession (1646, The Westminster Standards), and Related Works)" removed Christian Magistracy from the Confession (WCF 1646), essentially emasculated Christianity, and set aside Christ's Crown and Covenant. Conveniently this removed churchmen and laymen from the battlefront of standing for Christ's Crown and Covenant and turned them into effeminate figureheads.

They have set up kings, but not by me: they have made princes, and I knew it not: of their silver and their gold have they made them idols, that they may be cut off. (Hosea 8:4)

We ought to obey God rather than men. (Acts 5:29b)

Some notable theologians have not been able to attain to covenanted reformation, at least in their public persona. It is not to be inferred that their work is not of value to Covenanted Reformation. To the contrary, some of their work is of exceptional value to those working toward a Third Reformation. Examples follow:
Richard Baxter
Charles Hodge
Gordon Haddon Clark (subscribed to the "American Version (1789)" of the Westminster Confession of Faith.)
John W. Robbins
John Owen
Jonathan Edwards
James Thornwell
C.H. Spurgeon

Adler, Mortimer, in GREAT BOOKS OF WESTERN CIVILIZATION, concluded that more problems are caused by the denial of God than by anything else -- it changes the whole tenure of life.

Without church discipline there is no church government, and, of course, no church.
Without magistracy (judgment, justice, law enforcement, punishment of wrongdoers, criminal prosecution, civil prosecution, equal justice for the "insane" and "mentally ill" (who in most cases are demoniacs), regulation of finance, business, all spheres of human activity -- in the absence of law enforcement, and regulation there is no government. Punishment of wrong doers is the primary function of a nation's government.

Moral habits . . . cannot safely be trusted on any other foundation than religious principle, nor any government be secure which is not supported by moral habits . . . Whatever makes men good Christians, makes them good citizens. -- Daniel Webster

Personally I find it helpful to begin each day by silently committing that day into God's hands. I thank Him that I belong to Him, and I thank Him that He knows what the day holds for me. I ask Him to take my life that day and use it for His glory. I ask Him to cleanse me from anyting which would hinder His work in my life. And then I step out in faith, knowing that His Holy Spirit is filling me continually as I trust in Him and obey His Word. . ." -- Billy Graham, from The Holy Spirit: Activating God's Power in Your Life

But many that are first shall be last; and the last shall be first. -- The Lord Jesus Christ (Matthew 19:30)

Anonymous, Church and State. Available (The Original Covenanter and Contending Witness, Vol. 1, February 26, 1993, No. 5) on the Puritan Hard Drive.

*Anonymous [Sundry Ministers of London], A Vindication of the Presbyteriall-government, and Ministry: Together, with an Exhortation, to all the ministers, elders, and people, within the bounds of the province of London, whether joyning with us, or separating from us. Published, by the ministers, and elders, met together in a provinciall assembly, Novemb. 2d. 1649. Wherein, amongst other things, these ensuing particulars are contained; 1. That there is a Church-government, by divine right. 2. That the magistrate, is not the fountain of Church-government. 3. That the presbyterial-government, is by divine right. 4. The inconveniencies of the congregationall-way. 5. That the ruling-elder is by divine right. 6. That it is the will of Jesus Christ, that all sorts of persons should give an account of their faith, to the minister, and elders, before admission to the Lords Supper; . . . 7. Directions to the elders, for the right managing of their office. 8. Directions to such as are admitted to the Lords Supper, . . . 9. Rules to preserve people, from the errours of these times. 10. That separation from our churches, is justly charged with schisme. 11. That ministers formerly ordained by bishops, need no new ordination. 12. The necessity and usefulness of catechizing. Licensed, entred, and printed according to order, 1649. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.

*Augustine, Saint (Aurelius Augustine, Bishop of Hippo, 354-430 AD), (author), Philip Schaff (editor), Marcus Dods (translator), St. Augustine's City of God and Christian Doctrine [A Select Library of the Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers of the Christian Church -- Volume 2], new edition, 624 pages, English, ISBN: 0802880991. Available (2 volumes, 1872 edition), on the Puritan Hard Drive.
Augustine is said to be the greatest Christian thinker next to the Apostle Paul. Luther set the BIBLE and the CONFESSIONS OF SAINT AUGUSTINE above all other books.
"One of the classic texts of Western civilization [it explains the fall of Roman in terms of Scripture -- compiler]. . . . DE CIVITATE DEI is an important contribution of interest to students of theology, philosophy, ecclesiastical history, the history of political thought, and late antiquity." -- Publisher (from the Cambridge University Press edition)
"Calvin paraphrased Augustine about 400 times in THE INSTITUTES OF THE CHRISTIAN RELIGION.
"St. Augustine's final sentence of THE CITY OF GOD is 'All things must be referred to the Glory of God.'
"When you see that, then you will see the key to the story, and you will see the key to history. . . .
"The classic exposition of history in terms of Scripture." -- C. Gregg Singer
"Augustine began writing THE CITY OF GOD at age 59 [shortly after the city of Rome had been sacked by the Goths in 410 A.D., much to the surprise, it is said, of both the Romans and the Goths. -- compiler], and worked on it, off and on, for much of the next 14 years. The impetus for the beginning of this vast work (and its recurring focus), was the charge of Pagans (polytheists) that Christianity was responsible for the decay and demise of the Roman Empire. The charge put forward the claim that the prosperity and social stability of the state was dependent upon polytheistic worship. In response, Augustine arrays several lines of argument, rebutting the assumed 'goodness' of the Pagan state, as such, and detailing the ethical/moral and logical failings of Paganism. Augustine displays tremendous scholarship, employing the writings of Paganism's greatest historians and philosophers in his case against their religious claims. The result is a giant literary, philosophical, historical, theological and exegetical work. . . .
"Against the 'city', i.e., society, of many gods, there is but one alternate society, this Augustine calls The City of God, adopting the expression found in several of King David's psalms. Not only is the society of many gods the society of polytheists, it is also the 'city' of pantheists, atheistic materialists and philosophical Cynics. In the case of the Cynics and atheists, these false gods are the myriad gods of self, indeed, at least as many gods (selves) as there are believers in them. Thus there are two 'cities,' two loves, two ways to understand the big questions of existence, two destinations. Says Augustine:

"The one City began with the love of God; the other had its beginnings in the love of self." XIV:13.
"The city of man seeks the praise of men, whereas the height of glory for the other is to hear God in the witness of conscience. The one lifts up its head in its own boasting; the other says to God: 'Thou art my glory, thou liftest up my head.' (Psalm 3.4). In the city of the world both the rulers themselves and the people they dominate are dominated by the lust for domination; whereas in the City of God all citizens serve one another in charity . . ." XIV:28 -- Wesley L. Janssen, Reader's Comment
"Augustine reflects deeply here on human nature and the meaning of eternal life and eternal punishment, within an explication of the 'meaning' of history. He writes of all human history as a single narrative. This also a work of Biblical exegesis, as Augustine treats Scripture as a historical document. For Augustine, creation is good, creation exists in time and has a history. Indeed, since God enters into history to show man His love, history itself is sanctified, through the City of God.
"The book contains the parallel histories of what Augustine terms the City of God and the City of Man, both descended from Adam. The City of Man is founded on murder (specifically fratricide, the murder of a brother, viz. Cain and Abel, Romulus and Remus). The City of Man has been deceived and debased, fallen under the sway of pagan gods, which appear to be either demons or, at best indifferent or benign spirits that are mistakenly worshipped. The City of God, on the other hand, is a pilgrim on this earth, toiling here in the joyous expectation of final salvation in God's Kingdom." -- Penn Jacobs, Reader's Comment
"His 'grand unifying theory' of Western civilization, uniting the organization of Rome with the thought of Greece and the revelation of the Bible, has been accepted as the de facto definition of what it means to be Western until only the very last few decades of our time. . . .
"This seamless blend of literary prowess from Rome's greatest scholar and highest ranking professor generates for the reader a powerful education in philosophy, history and theology, tied together with awesome rhetoric, that is uniquely powerful, erudite, insightful and useful all at once.
"As it is written for the leaders of society and not for the average citizen, be ready to be intrigued, challenged to thought, and impressed with every line.
"By no means must the reader have any kind of religious belief to benefit from this book, nor must the reader agree with all that Augustine postulates, nor can the reader, due to the great distance of time separating him from us and improvements in scientific knowledge since his time. The importance, greatness and power of the writing itself commend it to us." -- Chris Miller, Reader's Comment
"One who has been introduced to Augustine through his auto-biographical CONFESSIONS may find it easier to follow his logic as he discusses the numerous topics of THE CITY OF GOD." -- Reader's Comment
"It would do the modern Church well to read this book since Augustine places THE CITY OF GOD (i.e., Christ and His Church), within the context of the pagan world in which we live, and its message is as applicable today as it was 1,500 years ago when he first wrote it." -- Reader's Comment
"History and theology in one rich volume." -- Reader's Comment
City of God, Saint Augustine, Philip Schaff (editor), Rev. Marcus Dods, D.D. (translator)
http://www.ccel.org/fathers/NPNF1-02/
The Confessions of Saint Augustine
"The story of his sinful pursuits before conversion, and of his conversion, then of his confession to God, and his discoveries of the greatness of God after his conversion." -- Publisher
http://www.ccel.org/a/augustine/confessions/confessions.html
The Works of Saint Augustine
http://onlinebooks.library.upenn.edu/webbin/book/lookupname?key=Augustine%2C%20Saint%2C%20Bishop%20of%20Hippo
Calvin's Commentaries (online)
http://www.ccel.org/ccel/calvin/calcom
Dr. C. Gregg Singer, The Christian View of History, lecture series.
http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?SID=7150273140
The Augustinian Approach to History
Dr. C. Gregg Singer, 47 min.
http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?SID=9150393751
Church History #09: Augustine #1
Dr. C. Gregg Singer, "Church History" lecture series.
http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?SID=41504163949
Church History #10: Augustine #2
Dr. C. Gregg Singer, "Church History" lecture series.
http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?SID=41504164048
Church History #11: Augustine #3
Dr. C. Gregg Singer, "Church History" lecture series.
http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?SID=41504164152

Baillie, Robert (1599-1662), The Unlawfulness and Danger of Limited Prelacy, or Perpetual Presidency in the Church, 1641. Alternate title: THE UNLAVVFULNESSE AND DANGER OF LIMITED EPISCOPACIE. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #23.
"A defense of: Henderson, Alexander. THE VNLAVVFULNES AND DANGER OF LIMITED PRELACIE."

Bannerman, D. Douglas (1842-1903), The Scripture Doctrine of the Church Historically and Exegetically Considered, 1887, ISBN: 0801006562 9780801006562. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #24.

*Bannerman, James (1807-1868), The Church of Christ: A Treatise on the Nature, Powers, Ordinances, Discipline, and Government of the Christian Church, 1869, 2 volumes. A Christian classic. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #24.
"Two large volumes. A classic on the Church and worship! This is one of the most extensive studies of its kind ever compiled. Nothing compares to it on this subject. Regarding these gems, Iain Murray has stated, 'In our day, however greatly we need an evangelical revival, we need more than that. We need another Reformation, a movement which will go 'to the root of the mischief' and bring back the visible church to the pattern of God's Word in her government, ordinances and ministry. The republication of Bannerman is a step in that direction . . . For those who wish to study the doctrine of the Church in its several aspects as it was held by the majority of the Reformers, Puritans, Covenanters and leaders of 'The Third Reformation,' it will prove an invaluable textbook." -- Publisher

Bannerman, James (1807-1868), Church and State: The Spiritual and Civil Courts.

Bates, Stewart, The Sin and Danger of Union Between the Church of Christ and an Immoral or anti-Christian Civil Government, 1841. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #25.

*Baxter, Richard (1615-1691), William Lamont (editor), A Holy Commonwealth, ISBN: 0521405807.
"A HOLY COMMONWEALTH is Richard Baxter's invisible masterpiece." -- William Lamont
"Written in 1659 by the Puritan minister (1615-1691), who publicly repudiated the work in 1670, this modern edition of a controversial text represents a candid confession as to why a conservative Puritan fought for Parliament in the Civil War and gave his support to the Cromwells." -- Publisher
Contains 380 theses on government with commentary when available. These 380 aphorisms are valuable casuistry in support of Christian magistracy.
Baxter's repudiation of the work is also included. It is interesting to note that he never repudiated the first part of the book, which lays the foundation for Christian Magistracy. It was only the second part that was repudiated by, as Lamont says, his public persona which was Arminian.
Apparently, in Richard Baxter we have an example of the Armenian being unable to stand publicly for Covenanted Reformation, yet his private persona wrote A HOLY COMMONWEALTH, and his unpublished papers show that he continued to recommend the work to associates after his public repudiation.
A Holy Commonwealth: or, Political Aphorisms, Opening the True Principles of Government: For the Healing of the Mistakes, and Resolving the Doubts, That Most Endanger England at This Time (1659)
http://archive.org/details/holywealth00baxt

Begg, James (1808-1883), Anarchy in Worship or Recent Innovation Contrasted with the Constitution of the Presbyterian Church and the Vows of Her Office-Bearers (1875). Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #3, #4 and #24.
"The principles upheld in this book are extremely important today, for as the title page notes 'When nations are to perish in their sins, 'Tis in the Church the leprosy begins.' Begg lays his foundations in the second commandment and deals with all man-made innovations in the worship of God. The four types of innovators exposed are especially interesting, being: 1. the presumptuous and blasphemous innovator; 2. the popularity-hunting innovator; 3. the politic and scheming innovator; 4. the aesthetic innovator. Women preachers, drama, dance and numerous other modern inventions in public worship would all be rejected outright if these Biblical principles were faithfully followed. Herein we also see why those holding to the Scriptural law of worship and the Westminster Confession of Faith (1646) must reject musical instruments in public worship as just another Popish and Judaizing innovation -- a resurrecting of the abrogated ceremonial law -- and thus a denial of the finished work of Christ. The discussion of vows taken by office holders to the Westminster Confession of Faith (1646), as they relate to worship, is also extremely important and should be read not only by all elders who have bound themselves to uphold the WCF [1646], but also by all Christians who love the truth and want to maintain the church in purity." -- Publisher

Brett, Thomas, The Independency of the Church Upon the State, as to its Pure Spiritual Powers: Proved From the Holy Scriptures, and the writings of the primitive Fathers. With answers to the most material objections. By Thomas Brett, LL.D. London, 1717.

Brown, John (of Wamphray, 1610-1679), An Apologetical Relation of the Particular Sufferings of the Faithful Ministers and Professors of the Church of Scotland Since 1660, Wherein Several Questions, Useful for the Time, are Discussed: The king's prerogative over parliaments and people soberly inquired into; the lawfulness of defensive war cleared; the supreme magistrate's power in church matters examined; Mr. Stillingfleet's notion concerning the divine right or forms of church government considered; the author of "The seasonable case" answered; other particulars, such as the hearing of the curates appearing before the high commission court, etc., canvassed . . . , etc., Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #8.

Brown, Thomas (1811-1893), Annals of the Disruption, 1893. Includes two volumes: FORMATION OF THE FREE CHURCH OF SCOTLAND and CHURCH AND STATE: A NARRATIVE OF THE STRUGGLE FOR INDEPENDENCE FROM 1560 TO 1843. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
"ANNUALS OF THE DISRUPTION chronicles the formation of the Free Church of Scotland, with extracts from the narratives of ministers who left the Scottish establishment in 1843. This battle over unlawful civil encroachments upon the church can be instructive today as the same principles still apply. Church government and education (re: home schools and private Christian schools), are most affected in our day by tyrannical civil 'authorities'." -- Publisher

*Brown, Thomas (1811-1893), Church and State: A Narrative of the Struggle for Independence From 1560 to 1843: The Third Series of Chalmers Lectures by Thomas Brown, ISBN: 0790541602 9780790541600. Alternate title: ANNALS OF THE DISRUPTION. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
"Hits all the historical high points surrounding the great Scottish struggle for the spiritual independence of the church -- against unbiblical usurpation by statist forces. From Knox to the author's day, the cause of civil liberty and the interests of vital (Reformed) religion, in church and state, are both set forth." -- Publisher

Buchanan, George, Roger A. Mason, and Martin S. Smith, A Dialogue on the law of Kingship Among the Scots: A Critical Edition and Translation of George Buchanan's De jure regni apud Scotos dialogus. Alternate title: DE JURE REGNI APUD SCOTOS DIALOGUS and A DISCOURSE CONCERNING THE DUE PRIVILEGE OF GOVERNMENT IN THE KINGDOM OF SCOTLAND and A DIALOGUE CONCERNING THE DUE PRIVILEGE OF GOVERNMENT IN THE KINGDOM OF SCOTLAND 1680, ISBN: 1859284086 9781859284087. Available (A DIALOGUE CONCERNING THE DUE PRIVILEGE OF GOVERNMENT IN THE KINGDOM OF SCOTLAND 1680), on the Puritan Hard Drive.
"A detection of the actions of Mary queen of Scots: concerning the murder of her husband, and her conspiracy, adultery, and pretended marriage with Earl Bothwel: and a defense of the true lords, maintainers of the king's majesty's action and authority." -- Publisher

*Burges, Cornelius (1589?-1665), The First Sermon Preached to the Honorable House of Commons now Assembled in Parliament at Their Public Fast, Nov. 17, 1640. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #29.
"A beautifully clear facsimile copy of this amazing sermon (published by order of the British House of Commons in 1641), exhorting this Parliament to 'stand to the covenant' of God; by, 'endeavouring of a further Sanction of, and stronger Guard about our true Palladium, the true Religion, already established among us; in the perfecting of the Reformation of it; in the erecting, maintaining, protecting, and encouraging of an able, godly, faithful, zealous, profitable, Preaching Ministry, in every Parish Church and Chapel throughout England and Wales; in interceding to the Kings sacred Majesty for the setting up of a Faithful, Judicious, and Zealous Magistracy, where yet the same is wanting, to be ever at hand to back such a Ministry: without either of which, not only the power of Godliness will sooner degenerate into formality, and zeal into lukewarmness; but Popery, Arminianism, Socinianism, Profaneness, Apostasy, and Atheism itself will more and more crowd in upon us, and prevail against us, do You all You can be all other means.' Points out that where a godly ministry and magistracy are lacking, society degenerates into a godless mob, headed by one of the above named heresies -- as we have seen in our day. Presses national covenant renewal, from Jer. 50:5 [Jeremiah 50:5], and explains from scripture how and why this should take place. Cites many biblical examples of the great Scriptural blessing that has followed previous national covenanting; while making practical application to the situation of the day. This sermon foreshadows chapter 23, of the celebrated Westminster Confession of Faith [1646], on 'the Civil Magistrate,' and gives much insight into this watershed period of Christian political development. It is highly recommended for anyone even remotely interested in seeing their nation prosper politically and ecclesiastically. Furthermore, it will be a great help for anyone seeking to formulate a biblical doctrine explaining the four way relationship between: loving God with all your heart, soul, strength and mind; Jesus Christ as mediator; the everlasting covenant (and covenanting); and the state, as set forth in Scripture. A very rare item. A Covenanter's delight! 70 pages." -- Publisher

*Calvin, John (1509-1564), The Institutes of the Christian Religion, 2 volumes, ISBN: 0664220207 0664220215. Considered to be among the ten greatest books in the English language. A Christian classic.
"Edited by John McNeill and translated by Ford Lewis Battles, this is the definitive English language edition of one of the monumental works of the Christian church -- Calvin's INSTITUTES.
"Still considered by many to be the finest explanation and defense of the Protestant Reformation available.
"The work is divided into four books: I. The Knowledge of God the Creator, II. The Knowledge of God the Redeemer in Christ, III. The Mode of Obtaining the Grace of Christ, IV. The External Means or Helps by Which God Allures Us Into Fellowship With Christ and Keeps Us in It. . . . THE INSTITUTES is praised by the secular philosopher, Will Durant, as one of the ten books that shook the world." -- GCB
Calvin spent a lifetime writing and perfecting INSTITUTES OF CHRISTIAN RELIGION. His Prefatory Address makes it clear that he intended the work to be a defense of Christianity to the King of France.
Therefore, plainly stated, one of the most influential works ever published in the English language is a defense of Christianity to leaders of State.
Prefatory Address to His Most Christian Majesty, The Most Mighty and Illustrious Monarch, Francis, King of the French, His Sovereign, John Calvin. Available in THE INSTITUTES OF THE CHRISTIAN RELIGION.
"Indeed, this consideration makes a true king: to recognize himself a minister of God in governing his kingdom. Now, that king, who in ruling over his realm does not serve God's glory, exercises not kingly rule but brigandage. [Footnote: 'Nec iam regnum ille sed latrocinium exercet.' An echo of Augustine's famous phrase: 'When justice is taken away, what are kingdoms [[regna]] but a vast banditry [[magna latocinia]]?' City of God, IV. iv (MPL [[Migne, J.P., Patrologiae cursus completus, series Latina]], 41. 115; tr. NPNF [[A Select Library of the Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers, second series]], II. 66)]. Furthermore, he is deceived who looks for enduring prosperity in his kingdom when it is not ruled by God's scepter, that is, his Holy Word; for the heavenly oracle that proclaims that where prophecy fails the people are scattered [Prov. 29:18 (Proverbs 29:18)], cannot lie." (Battles translation)
"The characteristic of a true sovereign is, to acknowledge that, in the administration of his kingdom, he is a minister of God. He who does not make his reign subservient to the divine glory, acts the part not of a king, but a robber. He, moreover, deceives himself who anticipates long prosperity to any kingdom which is not ruled by the sceptre of God, that is, by his divine word. For the heavenly oracle is infallible which has declared, that where there is no vision the people perish (Proverbs 29:18), (Beveridge translation)."
See the entire Prefatory Address, Beveridge translation. Considered to be one of the greatest prefaces ever written.
http://www.ccel.org/ccel/calvin/institutes.ii.viii.html
"The doctrines of covenant liberty were rediscovered in the Reformation. John Calvin went further than anyone else in defining liberty and what Christians need to do to maintain it. Includes bibliographies."
It is recommended that INSTITUTES OF CHRISTIAN RELIGION be used for daily devotions and may be used in combination with Ford Lewis Battles and John Walchenbach, AN ANALYSIS OF THE INSTITUTES OF THE CHRISTIAN RELIGION OF JOHN CALVIN and with CALVIN'S COMMENTARIES.
Calvin's Commentaries at BibleStudyGuide.org
http://www.biblestudyguide.org/comment/calvin/comm_index.htm
Calvin's Commentaries, complete
From the Calvin Translation Society edition.
http://www.ccel.org/ccel/calvin/commentaries.i.html
One Hundred Aphorisms, Containing, Within a Narrow Compass, the Substance and Order of the Four Books of THE INSTITUTES OF THE CHRISTIAN RELIGION
http://www.lettermen2.com/pringle.html
Calvin, Jean (1509-1564), Institutes of the Christian Religion; A New Translation by Henry Beveridge (1845), Volume: 1
http://archive.org/details/instituteschrist01calvuoft
Calvin, Jean (1509-1564), Institutes of the Christian Religion; A New Translation by Henry Beveridge (1845), Volume: 2
http://archive.org/details/institutesofreli02calvuoft
Calvin, Jean (1509-1564), Institutes of the Christian Religion, Beveridge translation
http://www.ccel.org/ccel/calvin/institutes.iii.vii.html
Monergism: Commentaries
From Mongergism.com search "commentaries."
http://www.monergism.com

Calvin, John (1509-1564), A Sermon on the Duty of Civil Rulers to Enforce and Defend the True Religion and True Godliness in their Realms by drawing out the sword against all Heretics and others who trouble the Church, and by strictly punishing whoredom, drunkenness, dancing, stageplays, &c., John Calvin. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
A sermon on 1 Timothy 2:1-2.
http://www.truecovenanter.com/calvin/calvin_12_on_Timothy.html

Caryl, Joseph (1602-1673), George Miller, and Giles Calvert, The Arraignment of Unbelief, as the Grand Cause of our Nationall Non-establishment: Cleared in a Sermon to the Honourable House of Commons in Parliament, at Margarets Westminster, Upon the 28th. of May, 1645. Being the day of Their Publike Fast. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.

Caryl, Joseph (1602-1673), David's Prayer for Solomon: Containing the Proper Endowments and Duty Royall of a King, With the Consequent Blessings Upon a Kingdome: Delivered in a Sermon at Christ-Church London, before the Right Honourable the Lord Major, the . . . aldermen his bretheren, together with the . . . companies of the said city, upon the 27th of March, 1643. Being the commemoration of His Majesties inauguration. A sermon.

*Coleman, John, Diplomacy by Deception, ISBN: 0964010488 9780964010482.
"True and accurate account of the treasonous conduct by the British and American governments. An account of how their citizens are deceived by policies provoking actions that are totally detrimental to the well being of their citizens.
"Thoroughly research, the book provides unpublished information on the gulf war and the Bolshevik Revolution. The chapter on covert actions throws new light on the murder of Martin Luther King, Pope John Paul, and other notables marked for elimination.
"The bloodshed that resulted from the creation of an artificial 'Saudi Arabia;' the foreign policy making role of the petroleum industry; the rape of Mexico by British and American oil barons; the revolutions they ignited which cost thousands upon thousands of lives; British conquest of India, the pernicious Indian 'apartheid' caste system. These are some of the subjects dealt with in this historic expose of how our governments deceive us under the color of diplomacy.
"DIPLOMACY BY DECEPTION tells us that the United Nations is a war-making body, not a peace-keeping organization, and how the Rockefellers and Alger Hiss, aided by the top Illuminati Dulles family, got the United States involved with the United Nations. There is a masterly analysis of constitutional roadblocks barring U.S. membership of the United Nations that will come as a surprise and leave no doubt that we are not now, nor can we ever be, a member of the United Nations.
"DIPLOMACY BY DECEPTION will forever alter your perception of the two leading governments in Western civilization. This is an excellent companion book to the COMMITTEE OF 300 by the same author." -- Publisher

Collins, William Edward, Church and Stated in England Before the Conquest, 1903, ISBN: 0524054932 9780524054932

Campbell, William M., Samuel Rutherfurd, Propagandist and Exponent of Scottish Presbytarianism: An Exposition of his Position and Influence in the Doctrine and Politics of the Scottish Church (Ph.D. thesis, Edinburgh University, 1937)

Cornelison, Isaac A., The Relation of Religion to Civil Government in the United States of America, 1895.

*Cunningham, John (1819-1893), The Church History of Scotland: From the Commencement of the Christian Era to the Present Time, 1882, 2nd edition, 2 volumes. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #30.
"Few people are as well qualified to write such a history as the author of these volumes. Provides a vivid recounting of the struggle for independence and religious freedom." -- Cyril J. Barber

*Cunningham, William (1805-1861), Church and State, the Biblical View: A Compilation of Articles From Some of the Best Christian Minds in History. A Christian classic. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #23.
"A compilation of articles from some of the best Christian minds in history, including Cunningham, Smeaton, M'Crie, Symington, Gillespie, the Westminster Divines, Bannerman, Owen and Shaw. This book shows that, generally speaking, the leaders of the Reformed faith have all come to substantial agreement regarding what the Scriptures teach about Christ's Kingship over the nations and the Church. Establishmentarianism is clearly seen to be the historically Reformed consensus, and this has a huge impact on the way one views both the Church and the state, in relation to Scripture." -- Publisher

Cunningham, William (1805-1861), Lecture on the Nature and Lawfulness of Union Between Church and State: Delivered at Edinburgh on the 27th November, 1834: Being the First of a Series of Lectures, at the Request of "The Edinburgh Young Men's Association for the Promoting the Interests of the Church of Scotland".

*Cunningham, William (1805-1861), The Westminster Confession on the Relationship Between Church and State. Alternate title: REMARKS ON THE TWENTY-THIRD CHAPTER OF THE CONFESSION OF FAITH, AS BEARING ON EXISTING CONTROVERSIES. A Christian classic. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #25.
"Chapter eight excerpted from DISCUSSIONS ON CHURCH PRINCIPLES. Answers the false claims that the Westminster Divines contradicted themselves on this issue and/or that they were Erastians. Proves that changes made to the original Westminster Confession, concerning church and state issues, were in error -- clearly demonstrating why this is so." -- Publisher
The Westminster Confession on the Relation Between Church and State, William Cunningham
http://www.westminsterconfession.org/a-godly-society/the-westminster-confession-on-the-relation-between-church-and-state.php

*Davies, Samuel (1723-1761), The Divine Government the Joy of the World. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
"Expands upon the reign and rule of King Jesus and the great blessings that this entails." -- Publisher
The Divine Government the Joy of the World, Samuel Davies
http://books.google.com/books?id=q2msGwAACAAJ&ie=ISO-8859-1&output=html

*Davies, Samuel (1723-1761, editor), et al., The Godly Family: A Series of Essays on the Duties of Parents and Children, ISBN: 1877611735 9781877611735, 341 pages.
"Gary Ezzo has collected 16 essays and sermons from 17th and 18th century pastors on ordering a godly home. The book is divided into four section: 1) The Importance of Family Religion, 2) The Duties of Parents, 3) The Duties of Children, 4) The Eternal Family. . . . All of these have been retypeset and updated for easier reading." -- Publisher
"The necessity and excellence of family religion / by Samuel Davies -- The great duty of family religion / by George Whitefield -- A plain and serious address on the important subject of family religion / by Philip Doddridge -- Parental duties illustrated / by Samuel Worcester -- The duties of parents towards their children / by Henry Venn -- Disciplining children / by Arthur Hildersham -- On the method of instructing children / by Henry Venn -- Four sermons on the religious education of children / by Philip Doddridge -- Blessings consequent upon parental fidelity / by Thomas Houston -- The duties of children to their parents / by Samuel Stennett -- The duties of children / by Henry Venn -- Heaven considered as a family / by Samuel Stennett."

Davies, Samuel (1723-1761), The Necessity and Excellence of Family Religion. Available in THE GODLY FAMILY: A SERIES OF ESSAYS ON THE DUTIES OF PARENTS AND CHILDREN. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #22.
"Promotes daily family worship based on an indirect application of 1 Tim. 5:8, 'But if any provide not for his own, and especially for those of his own house, he hath denied the faith, and is worse than an infidel'." -- Publisher

Dill, James Renwick, Christian Government and the Sabbath.

Dodds, Josiah, Essay on Civil Government, 1851. http://www.covenanter.org/CivilGovt/doddsessay.htm

Eells, Edward, Christ, the Foundation of the Salvation of Sinners, and of Civil and Ecclesiastical Government: Illustrated in a Sermon, preached before the General Assembly of the colony of Connecticut, on the day of the anniversary election, May 14th, 1767.

Forbes, Steve, A New Birth of Freedom: Vision for America, ISBN: 0895263203 9780895263209.
"America today has the potential for the greatest economic boom and spiritual renewal in our history. Presidential candidate and publishing magnate Steve Forbes shows how we can once again brighten economic prospects for everyone, reform our corrupt political institutions, and restore the severely weakened moral foundations of our country." -- Publisher

Free Presbyterian Church of Scotland, Synod, History of the Free Presbyterian Church of Scotland (1893-1970), ISBN: 0902506099 9780902506091.

Fuller, Andrew, Importance of Union of Public and Private Interests in the Service of God. In THE COMPLETE WORKS OF ANDREW FULLER (1:469-74).

*Geller, Pamela, Robert Spencer, and John Bolton (foreword), The Post-American Presidency: The Obama Administration's War on America, ISBN: 9781439189306 1439189307 9781439189900 1439189900 9781439190364 1439190364.
"Popular conservative blogger Pamela Geller, and New York Times bestselling author Robert Spencer team up to expose the Obama administration's destructive agenda -- largely ignored by the mainstream media -- and rally Americans to protect the sovereignty of a country that is under siege by the highest levels of its own government.
"America is being tested in a way that she has never been tested before. Since taking the oath of office in January 2009, President Barack Obama has cheered our enemies and demoralized our allies. He is hard at work 'remaking' America by destroying the free-market system and nationalizing major segments of our economy, demonizing dissent and restricting freedom of speech, turning against our longtime friends, and above all, subjecting us to the determinations of foreign authorities.
"As Americans see their paychecks shrinking every day, Obama ignores our forefathers' founding principle: individual rights. Instead, he seeks to level the playing field -- to transform both the global and national landscape in favor of our enemies -- even if it means cutting America off at the knees. He envisions himself as more than just a president of the United States, but as a shaper of the new world order, an internationalist energetically laying the groundwork for global government: the president of the world.
"A vital guide to helping conservatives prepare for the tough battles ahead, The Post-American Presidency critically examines the Obama administration's ominous and revealing moves against our basic freedoms, particularly as he seizes control of the three engines of the American economy: health care, energy, and education. The Shining City on a Hill has gone dark. But America is not dead. The time is NOW to stand up and fight. -- Publisher

*Gillespie, George (1613-1648), Aaron's Rod Blossoming; or, the Divine Ordinance of Church Government Vindicated, 1646. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available in THE PRESBYTERIAN'S ARMOURY.
"The remainder of the title reads: 'So as the Present Erastian Controversy Concerning the Distinction of Civil and Ecclesiastical Government, Excommunication and Suspension, is Fully Debated and Discussed, from the Holy Scriptures, for the Jewish and Christian Antiquities, from the Consent of Later Writers, from the True Nature and Rights of Magistracy, and from the Groundlessness of the Chief Objections made Against the Presbyterial Government, in Point of a Domineering Arbitrary Unlimited Power'."
"In short, this book deals with the biblical view of the separation of church and state, and is especially pertinent concerning the modern political climate, in which the old Erastian tree of civil ecclesiastical interference is growing strong and spreading much poisonous fruit. As with just about everything else Gillespie wrote, this book has been widely recognized as THE classic in its field. Three major sections cover 'Of the Jewish Church Government;' 'Of Christian Church Government;' and 'Of Excommunication from the Church, and of Suspension from the Lord's Table.' Lachman, in his Preface writes, 'It presents the classic Reformed point of view, one now little heard and perhaps less understood. Gillespie writes carefully and clearly, in many respects resembling the better know John Owen in the clarity and power of his reasoning.' Bannerman states, 'This famous treatise is unquestionably the most able, learned, systematic, and complete work on the Erastian controversy in existence. It deserves, and will repay, the most careful study.' (The Church of Christ, vol. 2, p. 432). Beattie, (Memorial Volume, p. xxxvi, 1879), called this book, 'the ablest plea for Presbytery ever made'." -- Publisher
Gillespie, George (1613-1648), Aaron's Rod Blossoming, or, The Divine Ordinance of Church Government Vindicated. (1844)
http://archive.org/details/aaronsrodblosso00gillgoog

*Gillespie, George (1613-1648), Ezekiel's Vision of Millennial Glory, Preparation for Coming Reformation and a Remedy for Backsliding and Lukewarmness. Available (THE PURITAN FAST SERMONS, 1640-1652, THE WORKS OF GEORGE GILLESPIE, and as two MP3 files), on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available (two MP3 files), on Reformation Bookshelf CD #18.
"This sermon was originally preached to England's House of Commons 'At Their Late Solemn Fast, Wednesday, March 27, 1644.' It is taken from volume one of Gillespie's two volume WORKS. It gives great insight into the covenanted unity, uniformity and worldwide Reformation sought by the majority of the Westminster Divines and the best of the civil leaders of Gillespie's day. Gillespie searchingly deals with the individual, the church and the state, while painting a Scriptural picture of prophesied earthly victory (Isa. 2:2-5 [Isaiah 2:2-5], Ezek. 47:1-12 [Ezekiel 47:1-12], etc.) -- in classic historicist postmillennial style -- which is sure to stir even the coldest Christian heart. He shows how the worst disease the land can suffer is corruption in religion (particularly as exhibited in false worship), rebukes those opposing the Solemn League and Covenant and calls upon all to maintain (and even improve upon), the Reformation attainments whereunto we have already attained. (Philippians 3:16). It is also interesting to note, especially since this sermon was preached before civil rulers, that though Gillespie points out the need for humility, repentance, prayer, tears, godly affections, sanctified minds and honorable actions, he does not forget to mention the importance of a covenanted army in this great cause of Christ's Covenanted Reformation. Also noted is the destruction of Antichrist, the calling and conversion of the Jews (Rom. 11 [Romans 11]), the two witnesses and the 1260 year apostasy. Gillespie closes with an appeal to the English House of Commons, with whom the Scots had 'joined in covenant and in arms,' to be faithful 'according to the word he (God -- RB), hath covenanted with you (i.e. in the Solemn League and Covenant -- RB), so his spirit remaineth among you' -- exhorting these magistrates to fear not but to be strong in the Lord, and in the power of his might. This is classic Covenanter preaching, among the best sermons you may ever hear!" -- Publisher

*Gillespie, George (1613-1648), Wholesome Severity Reconciled With Christian Liberty, 1645, two audio files. Available (PDF and MP3 files), on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on the Naphtali Press CD.
"Gillespie was a major force at the Westminster Assembly. This rare item gives great insight into the original intent of the framers of the Westminster documents concerning matters of conscience, liberty, law, and government. Dr. Greg Bahnsen has noted how sections mirror modern theonomic thought. Read on cassette for the first time ever! This item can also be found in written form in volume four of Naphtali Press' Anthology of Presbyterian and Reformed Literature." -- Publisher
Wholesome Severity Reconciled With Christian Liberty, or, The True Resolution of a Present Controversy Concerning Liberty of Conscience, 1645
http://www.naphtali.com/severity.htm
Gillespie, George, Wholesome Severity Reconciled With Christian Liberty
http://www.covenanter.org/reformed/2016/4/21/wholesome-severity-reconciled-with-christian-liberty

Gouge, William (1578-1653), God's Three Arrows: Plague, Famine, Sword, 1631. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
"Notes: 'Deaths death', 'The Churches conquest over the sword', 'The extent of Gods providence, set out in a sermon', and 'The dignitie of chivalry, set forth in a sermon' each have separate dated title page; pagination and register are continuous. 'The dignitie of chivalry' was first published separatley in 1626."
Subject: Providence and government of God

Hall, David W., The Early Church and the State
http://capo.org/premise/96/feb/p960208.html

*Hall, David W., Savior or Servant? Putting Government in its Place, ISBN: 0965036715 9780965036719.
"SAVIOR OR SERVANT? is the single best volume of Christian thinking on the issue of the increasingly intrusive state . . . Theology at its very best: orthodox, relevant, and provocative." -- George Grant
"SAVIOR OR SERVANT? PUTTING GOVERNMENT IN ITS PLACE is an attempt to define the role of the state: Shall it be a minister or a Messiah? Using ancient but timeless information, David W. Hall has surveyed the Bible and arrived at a coherent theology of the state. This study succeeds in identifying the responsibilities that the civil state is mandated to do, permitted to do, and prohibited from doing. Along the way, it is discovered that all political schemes and issues are fraught with theological value. Moreover, the most enduring grid to keep government in its rightful place is found in the Bible. Drawing upon thousands of verses and hundreds of thinkers, this volume is comprehensive yet readable. Theologians from Augustine to Calvin and from Aquinas to Barth are studied and presented in a non-technical manner. The Christian who is interested in politics should absorb these summaries before launching out into unstudied political activism. Rather than adopting a politics-as-usual posture, Hall challenges partisans from the right and from the left. He summons Christians to the old paths, which God's Word has occupied for centuries. Discussed in these chapters are perennial matters of practical importance, such as: taxation; resistance to evil governments; methods of influence; the escalation of rights; limited government; moral qualities for leaders; separation of powers. This book will provide excellent fodder for discussion and guidance. It returns spiritual principles to their place, while seeking to put government in its proper place.
SAVIOR OR SERVANT? is a revival of a classic approach to limited government. In a time when nations are finally beginning to shrink bloated governments, a surprising source commends itself as an able assistant in reform. The scriptural view of the state, removed from the varied fads of political science, provides an enduring perspective by which to measure all states. This study begins with a survey of biblical teaching on pressing matters of state today. Following the contours of the Old and New Testaments, SAVIOR OR SERVANT? calls all levels of government to a servant posture, rather than allowing officials to dominate. A historical tracing of the best and most pertinent that theology has to offer on the subject is contained in these pages." -- Publisher
From Reformation to Revolution: 1500-1650, Chapter 10: Savior or Servant? Putting Government in its Place
http://capo.org/premise/96/mar/p960304.html

Herle, Charles (1598-1659), A Pair of Compasses for Church and State: Delivered in a Sermon Preached at St. Margarets in Westminster Before the Honorable House of Commons, at Their monethly Fast November the Last, 1642. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.

*Hodge, Charles (1797-1878), The Relation of Church and State, by Charles Hodge, in the Trinity Review, July/August, 1988.
"Hodge was one of the greatest exponents and defenders of historical Calvinism in America during the 19th century." He was the principal of Princeton Theological Seminary between 1851 and 1878.
Charles Hodge "has been called the 'prince of American theologians.' Hodge was perhaps the most influential Presbyterian theologian of the nineteenth century, an instructor at Princeton Seminary for decades, and the author of many books, including his three volume SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY." (John W. Robbins)
Read what Charles Hodge says in The Relation of Church and State -- The American Church, in support of the newly discovered "novel, yet sound, doctrine" of the relationship between Church and State in America. Then decide for yourself if he unscripturally conceded to delivering the Church into the hands of the State in the "American Version, 1789" of THE WESTMINSTER CONFESSION OF FAITH.
The Biblical doctrine of Christian Magistracy (Bible Magistracy Turns Back the Wrath of God) functions correctly only when State leadership is Christian, and when the State can be depended upon to wield their sword to protect true religion. The history of the human depravity in State leadership (secular leaders who destroy true religion instead of protecting it), should not cause theologians to abandon sound doctrine as stated in the original WESTMINSTER CONFESSION OF FAITH (1646). Treachery in State leadership would be far less of a problem if the writers of the US Constitution had not removed the religious test clause of Colonial constitutions. This was done in America with the adoption of the "AMERICAN VERSION" OF THE WESTMINSTER CONFESSION OF FAITH and THE U.S. CONSTITUTION in 1789.
Besides arguing in support of the "AMERICAN VERSION" OF THE WESTMINSTER CONFESSION "he [Charles Hodge], repudiated the unhistorical position of those who denied the validity of Roman Catholic baptism . . . Hodge supported slavery in the 1830s, and while he condemned the mistreatment of slaves he did not condemn the institution of slavery itself. The background to this attitude, however, was not primarily his understanding of the Bible's teaching on the matter, but rather his churchmanship. . . .
"In 1846, however, he became convinced that slavery was wrong, reversing his earlier anti-abolitionist stance, and he then publicly denounced slavery and supported both the Abolitionist movement and President Lincoln (Adams, 2003)." -- http://www.newworldencyclopedia.org/entry/Charles_Hodge, February 15, 2014
American Covenanters decried the "American Version." See the Covenanter document:
Reformed Presbyterian Catechism, William L. Roberts D.D.
http://archive.org/details/ReformedPresbyterianCatechism
We love Gordon Clark, and we hold him in highest esteem, one of the great minds of the 20th Century. However, astonishingly, he seems to have adopted Hodge's position on the "American Version." This relieves the State of judicial responsibilities to preserve true religion, and delivers the Church into the hands of the State. Hence, today we have the "church effeminate" and, consequently, a destabilization of every sphere of society, including that of the Reformed Church. Could this be one reason for the failure of Church courts today?

*Howie, John (1735-1793, collector and transcriber), Michael Shields, James Guthrie, John Kid, John King, et al., Faithful Contendings Displayed: Being an Historical Relation of the State and Actings of the Suffering Remnant in the Church of Scotland Subsisted in Select Societies, and Were United in General Correspondencies During the Hottest Time of the Late Persecution, viz. From the Year 1681 to 1691: Together with an account of the State of the land in general, and of the society people in particular, in the intervals betwixt each of their general meetings, with some pertinent remarks upon these historical occurrences, and many letters to and from the general correspondent meetings, 1780, ISBN: 1171237324 9781171237327 0548345945 9780548345948. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
The long title continues: "Collected and kept in record by Mr. Michael Shields, who was clerk unto these general societies, and personally present at most of their meetings. To which is added, ten considerations on the danger of apostacy and defection from a covenanted work of reformation. By Mr. James Guthrie, sometime minister of the Gospel at Stirling. As also, a collection of very valuable sermons, preached by these faithful and eminent servants of Jesus Christ, Messrs. John Kid, John King, John Welch, John Blackadder, John Dickson, and Gabriel Semple. Collected and transcribed by John Howie, and published at the desire of some of those who desire to own the same testimony that some of those authors owned and sealed with their blood." -- long title continued
"Howie is famous for his BIOGRAPHIA SCOTICANA: OR, A BRIEF HISTORICAL ACCOUNT OF THE LIVES, CHARACTERS, AND MEMORABLE TRANSACTIONS OF THE MOST EMINENT SCOTS WORTHIES (often just called SCOTS WORTHIES), but this work is just as valuable. A massive, rare classic, in which Howie aims at 'the gaining of friends unto, or confirming them in the covenanted interest, in a subserviency to God's glory and the good of His church' (preface, p. xxiv). Contains much information on the Reformation and the sufferings of the Covenanters which is found nowhere else (to our knowledge)." -- Publisher

*Howie, John (1735-1793), Reformation Principles, &c. Re-exhibited. A Collection; Containing I. The National Covenant and Solemn League and Covenant, With the Acknowledgement of Sins, and Engagement to Duties . . . II. Plain Reasons for Presbyterians Dissenting From the Revolution-Church in Scotland. As Also, Their Principles Concerning Civil Government, . . . now corrected and enlarged.

*Johnston, John C., Treasury of the Scottish Covenant. A Christian classic. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #27.
"A massive listing (over 671 pages), covering Covenanting literature from the period of the Reformation to its publication in 1887. Contains not only the principal literary productions of the Covenanters (in the course of the long-sustained and heroic resistance offered by them to the spiritual despotism thrust against them in both church and state), but all of the chief historical documents connected with this period of history. Inspiration and courage can be drawn from the memories and associations of these events and writings. Here is one example of what you will find (from page 349 in the book): '(Richard) Camerons' head and hands, cut from his body at Airsmoss, were taken to his father, then suffering in prison in Edinburgh for the Covenant. He was asked if he knew them. 'His words,' says Dr. Kerr, 'were surely the most touching of all the memories of that cruel time: 'I know, I know them! they are my son's, my dear son's! It is the Lord: good is the will of the Lord, who cannot wrong me nor mine, but has made goodness and mercy to follow us all our days.' After which, by order of the Council, his head was fixed upon the Netherbow Port, and his hands beside it, with the fingers upward, a kind of preaching 'at the entry of the city, at the coming in at the doors,' that told more for his cause and against the persecutors than all the words he could have spoken.' A must for every serious theological student, religious library, or rare book collector who has any interest in Reformation thought and/or literature. It is a veritable gold mine of information, facts, documents, book listings and more!" -- Publisher
Johnston, John C., Treasury of the Scottish Covenant
http://archive.org/details/treasuryofscotti00john

Kah, Gary, and Rick Blanchette (editor), The New World Religion, ISBN: 0967009804 9780967009803.
"The New Age movement is a complicated mass of false religious systems dating back to the Tower of Babel. Gary takes them as a whole and shows the reader exactly where this system is headed. From the religious and social implications to the political and environmental, Gary's research shows us that we are closer to anti-Christian upheaval in the name of peace than we ever thought.
"What's most interesting is the Catholic tie in. Gary proves that Catholicism has, right now, the inside track to being the official religious arm of the U.N. He also does a great job in documenting the Catholic/New Age relationship." -- Reader's Comment

*Kelly, Douglas F., The Emergence of Liberty in the Modern World: The Influence of Calvin on Five Governments From the 16th Through 18th Centuries, ISBN: 0875522971.
"Examines Calvin's influence on the civil governments of Geneva, Huguenot France, Knox's Scotland, Puritan England, and Colonial America. Shows how Calvin's legacy continues to bear upon the issues that guide and agitate Western nations today."-- Publisher

*Kennedy, D. James (1930-2007), with Jim Nelson Black, Character and Destiny: A Nation in Search of its Soul, ISBN: 0310443806 9780310443803.
"America faces a crisis of moral authority. In this penetrating, informative book, Dr. D. James Kennedy takes readers to the core of today's cultural erosion. The United States' rich heritage of Christian liberty is now being corrupted by those who are trying to rewrite or reinterpret history. Even our traditional values are being undermined by our educational system. More than ever, we need to assert the truth -- the truth of the existence of sin and of the absolute nature of morality." -- Publisher
Dr. Kennedy regards this work as his most important book to date.

*Kennedy, D. James (1930-2007), with Jerry Newcombe, What if the Bible had Never Been Written? ISBN: 0785271546 9780785271543.
"Following its predecessor, WHAT IF JESUS HAD NEVER BEEN BORN, WHAT IF THE BIBLE HAD NEVER BEEN WRITTEN is a veritable compendium of the major accomplishments of the western world. D. James Kennedy demonstrates quite capably that many of the most fundamental stages of advancement for mankind over the last 2000 years began with the impetus of people whose lives were influenced by the Holy Scriptures. The book reads easily and keeps the attention of the reader as the author moves from one aspect of human development to another. He also explodes some myths along the way with clear and concise excerpts from personal letters, writings and biographies of the individuals about whom he writes. All in all, I would recommend this book to those who question the validity and potency of the Bible and to those who need to bolster their faith and resolve in the Book of books." -- Reader's Comment

*Kennedy, D. James (1930-2007), with Jerry Newcombe, What if Jesus had Never Been Born? The Positive Impact of Christianity in History, ISBN: 0785271783 9780785271789.
Hospitals, universities, literacy and education, capitalism and free-enterprise, representative government, separation of political powers, justice and common law, civil liberties, abolition of slavery, modern science, and so forth can all be attributed to Christianity.

*Kerr, James (1847-1905), Church and State: Three Lectures. I. Religious Equality -- National Disaster. II. Erastian Establishment -- Ecclesiastical Dishonour. III. Scriptural Establishment -- Imperial Glory. Available in pamphlet format from:
Covenanter Pamphlets
http://www.covenanter.org/pamphlets/
Church and State: Three Lectures. I. Religious Equality -- National Disaster. II. Erastian Establishment -- Ecclesiastical Dishonour. III. Scriptural Establishment -- Imperial Glory
http://www.covenanter.org/reformed/2015/8/7/james-kerrs-three-lectures-on-church-and-state

*Knox, John (1505-1572), Appellation From the Sentence Pronounced by the Bishops and Clergy: Addressed to the Nobility and Estates of Scotland. Alternate title: THE APPELLATION OF JOHN KNOX FROM THE CRUELL . . . SENTENCE PRONOUNCED AGAINST HIM BY THE FALSE BISHOPPES AND CLERGEY OF SCOTLAND, WITH HIS SUPPLICATION AND EXHORTATION TO THE NOBILITIE, ESTATES, AND COMMUNALTIE OF THE SAME REALME, and THE APPELLATION . . . TO THE SCOTTISH NOBILITY, and REFORMATION, REVOLUTION AND ROMANISM: AN APPEAL TO THE SCOTTISH NOBILITY, and THE APPELLATION FROM THE SENTENCE PRONOUNCED BY THE BISHOPS AND CLERGY: ADDRESSED TO THE NOBILITY AND ESTATES OF SCOTLAND, and THE APPELLATION. Cover title: REFORMATION, REVOLUTION AND ROMANISM: APPEAL TO THE SCOTTISH NOBILITY (1558). Available (singly as REFORMATION, REVOLUTION AND ROMANISM, in which key text have been underlined by a previous reader), on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available (REFORMATION, REVOLUTION AND ROMANISM), on Reformation Bookshelf CD #1 (MP3), #26. Available (APPELLATION FROM THE SENTENCE PRONOUNCED BY THE BISHOPS AND CLERGY: ADDRESSED TO THE NOBILITY AND ESTATES OF SCOTLAND), on the Library of Presbyterian Heritage Publications and Protestant Heritage Press CD-ROM Library. Available (APPELLATION FROM THE SENTENCE PRONOUNCED BY THE BISHOPS AND CLERGY: ADDRESSED TO THE NOBILITY AND ESTATES OF SCOTLAND), in THE WORKS OF JOHN KNOX, Vol. 4. [John Knox; David Laing ((collector and editor)), THE WORKS OF JOHN KNOX, Vol. 4, reprint of the 1855 edition printed for Bannatyne Club, Edinburgh (New York: AMS Press, 1966)].
"David Chilton notes, 'Of all the sixteenth-century Reformers, John Knox remains the most ardently loved and fiercely hated. No other leader of his day saw so clearly the political issues in the light of Scripture. Nor has any of his contemporaries had so much direct influence upon the subsequent history of the world. He transformed a land of barbarians into one of the most hardheadly Calvinistic cultures ever to exist, and his doctrines lie at the core of all Protestant revolutionary activity. While he is often considered merely one of Calvin's lieutenants, he was actually a Reformer in his own right. In some respects he was the greatest of them all.' ("John Knox," in The Journal of Christian Reconstruction: Symposium on Puritanism and Law [Vallecito, CA: Chalcedon], Vol. V, No. 2, Winter, 1978-79, p. 194)
"Furthermore, R.L. Greaves has noted that 'it has even been suggested -- and not altogether without merit -- that Knox was a key link in the development of political ideology that culminated in the American Revolution.' (Theology and Revolution in the Scottish Reformation: Studies in the Thought of John Knox [Grand Rapids, MI: Christian University Press, 1980], p. 156)
"Moreover, Mason [Roger A. Mason -- compiler], states that this APPEAL [APPELLATION FROM THE SENTENCE PRONOUNCED BY THE BISHOPS AND CLERGY: ADDRESSED TO THE NOBILITY AND ESTATES OF SCOTLAND -- compiler], 'is the most important . . . of Knox's political writings' (in the Introduction to his compilation of Knox's political writings entitled KNOX: ON REBELLION). [see annotation for KNOX: ON REBELLION elsewhere in this bibliography -- compiler]. It shows in a conclusive manner that Knox wanted a Theonomic Establishment which was careful to 'disapprove, detest, oppose and remove all false worship and all monuments of idolatry' (cf. Westminster Larger Catechism, #108). It also clearly demonstrates that Knox believed in and promoted the continuing binding validity of the Old Testament case laws and the penal sanctions attached to them, including the death penalty.
"Kevin Reed, in a editor's note, introducing this piece in his newly published SELECTED WRITING OF JOHN KNOX [Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. -- compiler], also points out that 'the Westminster Confession provides a distinct echo of Knox, when it states that the magistrate ""hath authority, and it is his duty, to take order, that unity and peace be preserved in the church, that the truth of God be kept pure and entire, that all blasphemies and heresies be suppressed, all corruptions and abuses in worship and discipline prevented or reformed, and all the ordinances of God duly settled, administered, and observed"" (Ch. 23:3, original wording). One secular historian once described Knox as 'Calvin with a sword,' making one wonder if he had not just been reading this very book. For 'where Calvin merely permitted disobedience to an ungodly ruler or immoral law, Knox championed armed rebellion -- a type of Calvinism that made religious revolution in Scotland possible.' (Christian History, Issue 46, p. 35). This is the best of the best; don't miss it!" -- Publisher
Knox, John, Appellation From the Sentence Pronounced by the Bishops and Clergy: Addressed to the Nobility and Estates of Scotland
This is a character scan (OCR) of the modernized text published by Protestant Heritage Press. While text may be cut and pasted it is subject to copyright.
http://www.swrb.com/newslett/actualNLs/appellat.htm
Knox, John (1505-1572), The Works of John Knox (1846), Vol. 4.
http://archive.org/stream/worksjohnknox07laingoog#page/n4/mode/2up
Reformation, Revolution and Romanism (1558), John Knox, MP3 file.
"This has been called John Knox's most important political writing. It also deals with Romanism, God's law, and much more.
http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?currSection=sermonssource&sermonID=1030075041
See also:
Goodman, Christopher (c. 1520-1603), HOW SUPERIOR POWERS OUGHT TO BE OBEYED OF THEIR SUBJECTS: AND WHEREIN THEY MAY LAWFULLY BY GOD'S WORD BE DISOBEYED AND RESISTED, 1558. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #26. Available (HOW SUPERIOR POWERS OUGHT TO BE OBEYED) on the Library of Presbyterian Heritage Publications and Protestant Heritage Press CD-ROM Library.
"From 1555 to 1558, Christopher Goodman served as co-pastor, with John Knox, of the congregation of English exiles in Geneva. During the course of his ministry, Goodman preached upon Acts 4:19 and 5:29: 'Whether it be right in the sight of God, to obey you rather than God, judge ye. We ought rather to obey God than men'. . . . In this book, Goodman contends against both ecclesiastical and political tyranny." -- Publisher
Goodman, Christopher (c. 1520-1603), How Superior Powers Ought to be Obeyed of Their Subjects
http://www.constitution.org/cmt/goodman/obeyed.htm
See also annotation for:
Knox, John (1505-1572), THE HISTORY OF THE REFORMATION OF RELIGION WITHIN THE REALM OF SCOTLAND. . . . TOGETHER WITH THE LIFE OF THE AUTHOR, AND SEVERAL CURIOUS PIECES WROTE BY HIM, . . . BY THE REVEREND MR. JOHN KNOX, . . . TO WHICH IS ADDED, I. AN ADMONITION TO ENGLAND AND SCOTLAND . . . BY ANTONI GILBY. II. THE FIRST AND SECOND BOOKS OF DISCIPLINE, GLASGOW, 1761. Alternate title: THE HISTORIE OF THE REFORMATION OF THE CHURCH OF SCOTLAND CONTAINING FIVE BOOKS: TOGETHER WITH SOME TREATISES CONDUCING TO THE HISTORY. EDITED, WITH A LIFE OF KNOX AND A PREFACE, BY DAVID BUCHANAN. INCLUDES: "THE APPELLATION OF JOHN KNOX, FROM THE . . . SENTENCE PRONOUNCED AGAINST HIM (pp. 1-33); "THE ADMONITION OF JOHN KNOX TO HIS BELOVED BRETHREN THE COMMONALTY OF SCOTLAND" (pp. 34-42); "A FAITHFULL ADMONITION MADE BY JOHN KNOX TO THE TRUE PROFESSORS OF THE GOSPEL OF CHRIST WITHIN THE KINGDOM OF ENGLAND, 1554" (pp. 43-79); "THE COPIE OF A LETTER DELIVERED TO QUEEN MARY, REGENT OF SCOTLAND" (pp. 80-97); AND "A SERMON PREACHED BY JOHN KNOX [AUGUST 19, 1565]," ISBN: 0851513581 9780851513584. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #1.

*Lloyd-Jones, D. Martyn (1899-1981), The Christian and the State: A Look at Contemporary Issues in the Light of Romans 13, 3 audio files.

*Loane, Marcus L., Makers of Religious Freedom in the Seventeenth Century: Henderson, Rutherford, Bunyan, Baxter.
"Students of church and state will appreciate this book because it narrates the vigorous struggle for religious freedom on the part of Alexander Henderson and Samuel Rutherford in Scotland, and John Bunyan and Richard Baxter in England." -- Cyril J. Barber

Long, Thomas, 1621-1707, A Compendious History of all the Popish and Fanatical Plots and Conspiracies Against the Established Government in Church and State in England, Scotland, and Ireland from the first year of Qu. Eliz. reign to this present year 1684 with seasonable remarks / Tho. Long. Alternate title: THE INTRIGUES OF THE PAPISTS AND FANATICKS AGAINST THE GOVERNMENT AND RELIGION ESTABLISHED HISTORICALLY RELATED, 1684.

*MacPherson, Hector, Scotland's Battles for Spiritual Independence, 1905.
"Ably delineates between the quest for power (ecclesiastical as well as political), and a true spirit of independence based upon Biblical principles. Describes the struggle between church and state, and lays justifiable stress upon the far-ranging effects of the battles they fought and won." -- Cyril J. Barber

Marshall, John Lewis, Natural Law and the Covenant: The Place of Natural Law in the Covenantal Framework of Samuel Rutherford's "Lex, Rex."
A dissertation. Philadelphia, PA: Westminster Theological Seminary, 1995.

Marshall, Stephen (1594?-1655), A Sermon Preached to the Right Honourable the Lord Mayor, and Court of Aldermen of the City of London, at Their Anniversary Meeting on Easter Monday April 1652, at the Spittle. Wherein the Unity of the Saints With Christ, the Head, and Especially With the Church, the Body; With the Duties Thence Arising, are Endeavoured to be Cleared. Tending to Heale our Rents and Divisions. The second impression, corrected by the authour. By Stephen Marshal B.D. and minister of the gospel at Finchingfield in Essex, 1652.

McClure, Donald, First Amendment a Master Piece of Satan Contra Antiestablishmentarianism. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
"This article was sent to 278 members of the Canadian Parliament. It debunks the idea that it is right for majorities to determine law through their elected officials in opposition to God's holy law. It also opposes the false theories of human rights found in the first amendment to the Constitution of the United States. In short, and in agreement with both the Belgic and Westminster Confessions, it opposes 'the presumption that a government, ordained of God, can be neutral, and can make no law stating that Jesus Christ is King of the Nation, and that it can hold all religions, which are repugnant to the Gospel of Jesus Christ, equal before it'." -- Publisher

*McCrie, Thomas (1772-1835), Brief View of the Evidence for the Exercise of Civil Authority About Religion. Available in STATEMENT OF THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THE PROFESSION OF THE REFORMED CHURCH OF SCOTLAND, AS ADOPTED BY SECEDERS, AND THE PROFESSION CONTAINED IN THE NEW TESTIMONY AND OTHER ACTS, LATELY ADOPTED BY THE GENERAL ASSOCIATE SYNOD, Section VII. A Christian classic. Considered to be among the ten greatest books in the English language. Available (STATEMENT OF THE DIFFERENCE), on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available (STATEMENT OF THE DIFFERENCE), on Reformation Bookshelf CD #25.
"M'Crie published at Edinburgh in 1807 a helpful discussion of the biblical evidence for an obligation of nations and their civil rulers to give recognition to the true religion. His book is a protest against the church in which he was ordained, and which subsequently departed from the principles it had espoused: STATEMENT OF THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THE PROFESSION OF THE REFORMED CHURCH OF SCOTLAND, AS ADOPTED BY SECEDERS, AND THE PROFESSION CONTAINED IN THE NEW TESTIMONY AND OTHER ACTS, LATELY ADOPTED BY THE GENERAL ASSOCIATE SYNOD. It has often been regarded as the best presentation of the confessional point of view respecting a national acknowledgment of religion. Churches formed after M'Crie's death found their conflicts over church principles defined in his literary output." -- Publisher
Brief View of the Evidence for the Exercise of Civil Authority About Religion
http://www.westminsterconfession.org/a-godly-society/the-exercise-of-civil-authority-about-religion.php

*M'Crie, Thomas (1772-1835), Statement of the Difference . . . Particularly on the Power of Civil Magistrates Respecting Religion, National Reformation, National Churches, and National Covenants, 1871. Alternate title: STATEMENT OF THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THE PROFESSION OF THE REFORMED CHURCH OF SCOTLAND, AS ADOPTED BY SECEDERS, AND THE PROFESSION CONTAINED IN THE NEW TESTIMONY AND OTHER ACTS LATELY ADOPTED BY THE GENERAL ASSOCIATE SYNOD. A Christian classic. Considered to be among the ten greatest books in the English language. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #25.
" 'The ablest exposition in the English language of the Establishment Principle . . . Dr. (George) Smeaton describes the Statement as a masterly defense of the principles of establishments as Scripture truth: and the most complete vindication ever given to the world of the position occupied by the Reformed Church of Scotland, on the whole subject of national religion and the magistrates legitimate power in promoting it. 'The same thoroughness,' wrote the late Rev. D. Beaton, 'which gave such abiding value to his great biography of Knox, is shown in this, his less known work . . . Dr. McCrie in his STATEMENT shows that all the Confessions of the Protestant and Presbyterian Churches of the Reformation, both in Britain and on the Continent of Europe, held and maintained the Establishment Principle. 'These harmoniously agree,' he writes, 'in declaring as with one mouth that civil authority is not limited to the secular affairs of men, and that the public care and advancement of religion is a principle part of the official duty of magistrates.' He goes on to give extracts from THE CONFESSION OF HELVETIA; THE CONFESSION OF BOHEMIA; THE CONFESSION OF SAXONY; THE FRENCH CONFESSION; THE BELGIC OR DUTCH CONFESSION; THE CONFESSION OF THE ENGLISH CONGREGATION IN GENEVA; THE SCOTS CONFESSION AND THE WESTMINSTER CONFESSION OF FAITH (1646). 'Such is the harmony of doctrine in the Protestant churches on this head,' he remarks, 'expressed in their confessions and public formularies drawn from the Word of God; a harmony which deserves great attention, and from which none should rashly depart' (as cited in CHRIST'S KINGSHIP OVER THE NATIONS by C.J. Brown). Concerning the doctrine of national obedience to Christ, M'Crie demonstrates in the most convincing way that there are few doctrines 'of the practical kind, in which the best interests of mankind and the general state of religion in the world, are more deeply concerned, than in the right and wrong determination of this question.' Contains an excellent preface by George Smeaton. Considered one of the definitive works on Church/State relations, defending the historic Reformed position. An extremely rare and very expensive item if located as a rare book." -- Publisher
Brief View of the Evidence for the Exercise of Civil Authority About Religion
http://www.westminsterconfession.org/a-godly-society/the-exercise-of-civil-authority-about-religion.php

*McLeod (M'Leod), Alexander (1774-1833), Messiah: Governor of the Nations of the Earth: A Discourse. Available (MESSIAH: GOVERNOR OF THE NATIONS OF THE EARTH) on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available (MESSIAH: GOVERNOR OF THE NATIONS OF THE EARTH) on Reformation Bookshelf CD #25. Available (MESSIAH: GOVERNOR OF THE NATIONS OF THE EARTH and THE WRITTEN LAW, OR THE LAW OF GOD REVEALED IN THE SCRIPTURES, BY CHRIST AS MEDIATOR; THE RULE OF DUTY TO CHRISTIAN NATIONS TO CIVIL INSTITUTIONS) at Covenanter.org. Available (the pamphlet, MESSIAH: GOVERNOR OF THE NATIONS OF THE EARTH, which includes THE WRITTEN LAW, OR THE LAW OF GOD REVEALED IN THE SCRIPTURES, BY CHRIST AS MEDIATOR) at Covenanter and Reformed Presbyterian Pamphlets.
"The doctrine of the Mediatorial Reign of Christ has formed the subject of those principles accounted distinctive to the Reformed Presbyterian Church. Christ's kingship over the nations and the implications of this doctrine will not be popular amongst a people deeply compromised with the spirit of the age. The prescription may seem tough, but the results of centuries of ignoring this doctrine have left the church effete and gutted when it comes to addressing matters concerning church and state relations. In the various modern debates one viewpoint has been left out, and it is the only one which presents a serious and rigorous biblical vision -- the Covenanter position on civil government.
"In the first discourse, Alexander McLeod explains the biblical basis and the importance of professing that Christ is the head over all nations. McLeod moves from an explanation of what is meant by confessing that Christ rules as Mediator, to a discussion of his administrations as ruler over the nations. Afterward he addresses numerous objections that are raised against the doctrine, in which he explains many finer points respecting Christ's Mediatorial administration.
"The second discourse, THE WRITTEN LAW, by Dr. James Renwick Willson (1780-1853), takes up a number of matters of great practical concern and application of the doctrine of this Mediatorship over the nations. Willson is particularly concerned with the place of the written law of God in the constitution of civil governments. Willson often courts controversy, and does not shy away from consistency. It is a blueprint for how things ought to be, if we would submit to Christ as a nation." -- Publisher
McLeod, Alexander, Messiah, Governor of the Nations of the Earth
http://www.covenanter.org/reformed/2015/8/18/alexander-mcleods-sermon-on-messiah-governor-of-the-nations-of-the-earth
Willson, James R. (1780-1853), The Written Law, or The Law of God Revealed in the Scriptures, by Christ as Mediator; The Rule of Duty to Christian Nations to Civil Institutions
http://www.covenanter.org/reformed/2015/8/18/james-r-willsons-sermon-on-the-written-law
Covenanter and Reformed Presbyterian Pamphlets
http://www.covenanter.org/pamphlets/

*Morey, Robert, The New Atheism and the Erosion of Freedom, ISBN: 0875523625 9780875523620.
"Exposes the godless suppression of religious freedom today and presents effective ways to convert atheists to Christ. In case you have not noticed atheism/secular humanism is gaining ground. Are you grounded in what these philosophies teach? Can you refute them? Dr. Morey will show you how." -- GCB
The American Atheist Union has said this is the most dangerous book ever written about religion.
Includes bibliography.

Muirhead, John. Dissertations on the Federal Transactions Between God and his Church, both before and since the canon of scripture was completed. By John Muirhead, . . . , 1782.

*Murray, Iain, The Reformation of the Church: A Collection of Reformed and Puritan Documents on Church Issues, ISBN: 085151118X 9780851511184.
"First published in 1965 and once again available. Documents are drawn largely from the 16th and 17th centuries and presents the finest thinking of the fathers on authority and freedom, the need for reformation, the nature of the government, unity, and membership of the Church of Jesus Christ." -- GCB

Newcome, William, A Comparison Between the Doctrines of Christianity and Those of Popery With Regard to Civil Government. A Sermon Preached in Christ-Church, Dublin; on Friday October XXIII, MDCCLXVII. Being the anniversary of the Irish rebellion. . . . By William Lord Bishop of Dromore.

*North, Gary, Political Polytheism: The Myth of Pluralism, ISBN: 093046432X 9780930464325.
"Political pluralism is not simply a political philosophy; it is a theology. This theology teaches that there must never be a nation that identifies itself with any religion." -- Publisher
"This book presents a new vision of politics and a new vision of America, a vision self-consciously tied to the Bible. . . . Dr. North, a trained historian, seeks to lead us from this downward spiral to full recovery." -- GCB
Institute for Christian Economics Freebooks.com
http://www.freebooks.com/

North, Gary, Tools of Dominion: The Case Laws of Exodus, ISBN: 0930464109 9780930464103.
Regarding Article VI, Section 3 of the U.S. Constitution, "the Framers knew that religious oaths were required for testifying in local and state courts. They knew that religious oaths were sometimes required for exercising the franchise in state elections, but they made it clear: Federal jurisdiction is governed by another covenant, and therefore by another god. It is therefore a rival system of hierarchy. It is not a complementary system of courts; it is a rival system, for an oath to the God of the Bible is prohibited by law in one of those hierarchies." -- Gary North in Appendix H: "Selling the Birthright: The Ratification of the U.S. Constitution," pages 1190-1216.
Includes bibliographical references and indexes.
Tools of Dominion: the Case Laws of Exodus
http://www.freebooks.com/

Owen, John (1616-1683), The Advantage of the Kingdome of Christ, in the Shaking of the Kingdoms of the World: or, Providential Alterations, in Their Subserviencie to Christ's Exaltation. Opened in a sermon preached to the Parliament, Octob. 24. 1651. A solemn day of thanksgiving for the destruction of the Scots army at Worcester, with sundry other mercies; by John Owen, minister of the Gospel, 1652. Alternate title: THE ADVANTAGE OF THE KINGDOM OF CHRIST, IN THE SHAKING OF THE KINGDOMS OF THE WORLD. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.

Owen, John (1616-1683), Truth and Innocence Vindicated in a Survey of a Discourse Concerning Ecclesiastical Polity, and the Authority of the Civil Magistrate Over the Consciences of Subjects in Matters of Religion, 1669).

Palmer, B.M., Influence of Religious Belief Upon National Character: An Oration Delivered Before the Demosthenian and Phi Kappa Societies of the University of Georgia, August 7, 1845.

Parker, Samuel (1640-1688), A Discourse of Ecclesiastical Politie Wherein the Authority of the Civil Magistrate . . . is Asserted, the mischiefs and inconveniences of toleration are represented, and all pretenses pleaded in behalf of liberty of conscience are fully answered, 1671.

*Parliament, The First Parliament During the Reign of James VI of Scotland, Christ's Triumphant Entry Into Scotland; Or, The Subjugation of the People, Laws, Liberties, and Crown of Scotland to His Supreme Majesty Jesus Christ, King of Kings, and Lord of Lords; Being, The Complete Text of all of the Acts of the First Parliament During the Reign of James VI of Scotland.
He shall not fail nor be discouraged, till he have set judgment in the earth: and the isles shall wait for his law. (Isaiah 42:4)
The LORD reigneth; let the earth rejoice; let the multitude of isles be glad thereof. (Psalm 97:1)
And he shall bring forth thy righteousness as the light, and thy judgment as the noonday. (Psalm 37:6)
http://truecovenanter.com/official/acts_of_parliament_scotland_james_vi_p01.phtml
See: Skene, John, THE LAVVES AND ACTES OF PARLIAMENT, MAID BE KING IAMES THE FIRST, AND HIS SUCCESSOURS KINGES OF SCOTLAND.

*Reformed Presbyterian Church of Scotland, Andrew Symington (editor), Lectures on the Principles of the Second Reformation. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #18.
"Contents: Second Reformation / Andrew Symington
Headship of Christ Over His church / James Ferguson
Evils, Constitutional and Practical of the Prelatic Establishment of the British Empire / Thomas Neilson
The Revolution Settlement of the Church of Scotland / John Graham
Patronage Opposed to the Independence of the Church and to the Scriptural Rights of Christian people / W.H. Goold
Headship of Christ Over the Nations / Andrew Symington
Nature and Obligation of Public Vows / William Symington
The sin and Danger of Union Between the Church of Christ and the Immoral or Anti-Christian Civil Government / Stewart Bates."
Lectures on the Principles of the Second Reformation
http://www.covenanter.org/reformed/2015/8/18/the-reformed-presbyterian-churchs-of-scotland-lectures-on-the-principles-of-the-second-reformation

Reformed Presbytery, Auchensaugh Renovation of the National Covenant and Solemn League and Covenant; With the Acknowledgement of sins and Engagement to Duties as They Were Renewed at Auchensaugh in 1712 . . . Also the Renovation of These Public Federal Deeds Ordained at Philadelphia, Oct. 8, 1880, by the Reformed Presbytery, With Accommodation of the Original Covenants, in Both Transactions, to Their Times and Positions Respectively, 1880 edition. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #2, #25, #30. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
" 'In 1712, at Auchensaugh, the Covenants, National and Solemn League, were renewed . . . At the renewal the covenant bonds were recognized as binding the descendants of those who first entered into those bonds. The Covenanters, however, sought to display the true intent of those Covenants with marginal notes. These notes explained that the Church of Jesus Christ, in Scotland (and around the world), must not join hands with any political power in rebellion to the crown rights of King Jesus. The Covenanters pledged the Covenanted Reformed Presbyterian Church to the support of lawful magistracy (i.e. magistracy which conformed itself to the precepts of God's Word), and declared themselves and their posterity against support of any power, in Church or State, which lacked biblical authority.' (From 'About the Covenanted Reformed Presbyterian Church' P.O. Box 131, Pottstown, PA 19464). An excellent introduction (historical and moral), regarding the reasons, motives and manner of fulfilling the duty of covenanting with God. Especially helpful concerning the Biblical view of the blessings (for covenant-keepers), and cursings (for covenant breakers), related to covenanting. As noted on page 37, 'the godly usually in times of great defection from the purity and power of religion, and corruption of the ordinances of God's worship, set about renewing their covenant, thereby to prevent covenant curses, and procure covenant blessing; as we find both in scripture record, 2 Chron. 15:12-13 [2 Chronicles 15:12-13]; 29:10 [2 Chronicles 29:10]; 34:30-31 [2 Chronicles 34:30-31]; Ezra 10:3, and in our own ecclesiastical history.' Times like ours certainly call for a revival of the Scriptural ordinance of covenanting, for 'the nations throughout Christendom, continue in league with Antichrist and give their strength to the beast. They still refuse to profess and defend the true religion in doctrine, worship, government and discipline, contrary to the example of the kingdoms of Scotland, England and Ireland in the seventeenth century'." (p. 136 in this book) -- Publisher
The Auchensaugh Renovation
http://www.covenanter.org/reformed/2015/8/24/renovation-of-covenants-auchensaugh-1712
Price, Greg L., The Auchensaugh Renovation, 2 audio cassettes [audio files]. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
"This is the story of the renewal of the National and Solemn League and Covenant, which took place under the leadership of John Macmillan (cf. The Cameronian Apostle by Reid), at Auchensaugh, July 24, 1712. Events leading up to this renewal are especially pertinent, as they expose the Satanic tactics which often become most useful to the devil in attacking all revivals and those seeking to return to covenanted attainments. Price notes how Cromwell's tolerationism opened the floodgates of iniquity and helped pave the way (though not intended by the covenant breaking Cromwellians), for the tyranny of Charles II. This set the stage for the corrupted and defective revolution of 1688 and the malignant Revolution church, which left the Covenanted Reformation buried under the debris of William's Erastianism, Prelacy (in England and Ireland), and the compromised Presbyterianism of the Revolution Church in Scotland (cf. Clarkson's Plain Reasons for Presbyterians Dissenting from the Revolution Church of Scotland; this Revolution church was the root of much modern day Presbyterian defection and this book still eloquently denounces this defection). The Auchensaugh Renovation cleared away all the Reformation denying rubbish that had accumulated from 1649 to 1712, and 'being agreeable to the Word of God' became part of the terms of communion of the Reformed Presbyterian church on Nov. 3, 1712 (cf. Terms of Ministerial and Christian Communion in the Reformed Presbyterian Church, point 4 of 6). It is also interesting to note that at the Lord's Supper (on July 27, 1712), following this covenant renewal, Macmillan, in 'fencing the tables' proclaimed, 'I excommunicate and debar from this Holy Table of the Lord, all devisers, commanders, users, or approvers, of any religious worship not instituted by God in His Word, all tolerators and countenancers thereof; and by consequence I debar and excommunicate from this Holy Table of the Lord, Queen and Parliament, and all under them, who spread and propagate or tolerate a false and superstitious worship, ay, and until they repent.' Furthermore, concerning those who opposed the covenants and the work of reformation, Macmillan trumpeted these faithful words, 'I excommunicate and debar all who are opposers of our Covenants and Covenanted Reformation, and all that have taken oaths contrary to our covenants, and such particularly as are takers of the Oath of Abjuration, whether Ministers or others, until they repent.' (Reformed Presbytery, The Auchensaugh Renovation . . . p. 55). Beyond the fascinating and detailed story of the history and reasons for the Auchensaugh renovation of the covenants, these studies also clearly and biblically explain the continuing obligation to renew lawful covenants, makes application to our day, and demonstrates how covenanting was foundational to the Second Reformation. A fine (and unique), set of tapes defending the attainments of our Covenanted Reformation! For more information see our bound photocopy The Auchensaugh Renovation . . . by the Reformed Presbytery." -- Publisher
The Reformed Presbytery, The Auchensaugh Renovation of the National Covenant and: Solemn League and Covenant With the Acknowledgment of Sins and Engagement to Duties, as They Were Renewed at Auchensaugh, Near Douglas, July 24, 1712. (Compared With the Editions of Paisley, 1820, and Belfast, 1835). Also, The Renovation of These Public Federal Deeds Ordained at Philadelphia, October 8, 1880, by the Reformed Presbytery, with Accommodation of the Original Covenants, in Both Transactions, to Their Times and Positions Respectively
http://archive.org/details/theauchensaughre12381gut

*Reformed Presbytery in North America (Steelite), David Steele (1803-1887), John Thorburn (1730?-1788), John Courtass (d. 1795), et al., Act, Declaration, and Testimony, for the Whole of the Covenanted Reformation, as Attained to, and Established in, Britain and Ireland; Particularly Betwixt the Years 1638 and 1649, Inclusive. As, Also, Against all the Steps of Defection From Said Reformation, Whether in Former or Later Times, Since the Overthrow of that Glorious Work, Down to This Present day (1876), (Philadelphia, PA: Printed by Rue and Jones, 1876), a new edition of the Ploughlandhead Testimony of 1761, the subordinate standard of the original "Steelite" Reformed Presbytery that was constitutes in 1840. Available (the 1850 edition only) on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available (the 1850 edition only) on Reformation Bookshelf CD #1.
"And now, when time has proved that more recent Testimonies, Terms, and Covenants, have failed to preserve either unity or uniformity among those who framed them; it cannot be unseasonable to re-exhibit the original ACT, DECLARATION, AND TESTIMONY, which has been justly characterized as 'the most profoundly reasoned document ever emitted by the Reformed Presbyterian Church'." -- The Reformation Advocate Magazine, Vol. I, No. 8, December, 1875, page 267
"Upholds the original work of the Westminster Assembly and testifies to the abiding worth and truth formulated in the Westminster family of documents. Upholds and defends the Crown Rights of King Jesus in Church and State, denouncing those who would remove the crown from Christ's head by denying His right to rule (by His law), in both the civil and ecclesiastical spheres. Testifies to the received doctrine, government, worship, and discipline of the Church of Scotland in her purest (reforming) periods. Applies God's Word to the Church's corporate attainments 'with a judicial approbation of the earnest contendings and attainments of the faithful, and a strong and pointed judicial condemnation of error and the promoters thereof.' (The Contending Witness magazine, Dec. 17/93, p. 558). Shows the church's great historical victories (such as the National and Solemn League and Covenant, leading to the Westminster Assembly), and exposes her enemies actions (e.g. the Prelacy of Laud; the Independency, sectarianism, covenant breaking and ungodly toleration set forth by the likes of Cromwell [and the Independents that conspired with him]; the Erastianism and civil sectarianism of William of Orange, etc.). It is not likely that you will find a more consistent working out of the principles of Calvinism anywhere. Deals with the most important matters relating to the individual, the family, the church and the state. Sets forth a faithful historical testimony of God's dealings with men during some of the most important days of church history. A basic text that should be mastered by all Christians." -- Publisher
Act, Declaration, and Testimony (1876)
https://archive.org/details/actdeclarationte00refo

*Reformed Presbytery in North America, "Steelite," (David Steele [1803-1887], James Campbell, Thomas Sproull, James Fulton), A Short Vindication of our Covenanted Reformation, 2nd Edition, Revised, and Enlarged by a Committee of the Reformed Presbytery ("Circular" and "Review" prefixed), 1879, 50 pages. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Also available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #2 (also #1, #25, and #30).
"Until the church comes to terms with what is written in this book it will remain weak and divided. Covenant breakers will not prosper, as this rare item demonstrates from both Scripture and history. The power packed ordinance of covenanting (the National and Solemn League and Covenant in particular), was foundational to the second Reformation and the work of the Westminster Assembly. 'By the National Covenant our fathers laid Popery prostrate. By the Solemn League and Covenant they were successful in resisting prelatic encroachments and civil tyranny. By it they were enabled to achieve the Second Reformation . . . They were setting up landmarks by which the location and limits of the city of God will be known at the dawn of the millennial day . . . How can they be said to go forth by the footsteps of the flock, who have declined from the attainments, renounced the covenants and contradicted the testimony of 'the cloud of witnesses. . . . All the schisms (separations) that disfigure the body mystical of Christ . . . are the legitimate consequences of the abandonment of reformation attainments, the violation of covenant engagements.' If you are interested in knowing how to recognize a faithful church (or state), when and why to separate from unfaithful institutions, who has held up the standard of Covenanted Reformation attainments and who has backslidden (and why), what it means to subscribe to the Westminster Confession (1646), (and why most that say they do so today do not have any idea of what that means), and much more concerning individual, family, church and civil, individual, family, church and civil duties, this is one of the best books you will ever lay your hands on. It chronicles 'some instances of worldly conformity and mark(s) some steps of defection from our 'covenanted unity and uniformity,' noting how 'it is necessary to take a retrospect of our history for many years; for we did not all at once reach our present condition of sinful ignorance and manifold apostasy.' Presbyterian and the Reformed churches lay under the heavy hand of God's judgement in our day, because of the very defections noted throughout this fine work. 'We heard (hear) from various quarters the cry, "maintain the truth, stand up for the principles of the Second Reformation;" and yet many of those who are the most loud in uttering this cry, appear desirous to bury in oblivion those imperishable national and ecclesiastical deeds, by which the church and kingdom of Scotland became 'married to the Lord.' Are we married to the Lord, or have we thrown off the covenants of our forefathers; are we the chaste bride of Christ, or a harlot who is found in the bedchambers of every devilish suitor (whether ecclesiastical or civil), who tempts us with the favors of this world? Let us cry out, as with 'the noble Marquis of Argyle, upon the scaffold,' when he said, 'God hath tied us by covenants to religion and reformation. These that were then unborn are yet engaged, and it passeth the power of all the magistrates under heaven to absolve them from the oath of God. They deceive themselves, and it may be, would deceive others, who think otherwise.' Not for the weak of heart." -- Publisher
A Short Vindication of our Covenanted Reformation, Reformed Presbytery
http://www.covenanter.org/reformed/2015/8/24/a-short-vindication-of-our-covenanted-reformation

*Reid, H.M.B., A Cameronian Apostle: Being Some Account of John Macmillan of Balmaghie, 1896. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #30.
"The author wrote this book 'considering the renewed interest taken at present in questions of Church government and establishment,' noting that 'there seemed to be some room for a detailed treatment of a career which covers so interesting a period as that embraced between 1690 and 1750.' Macmillan is an important historical link to those who still fight for Christ's Crown and Covenant. 'For many years he fought the battle of the Covenants alone, and he fought it on lines of policy and wisdom.' states Reid. Furthermore, the author continues, 'I have tried to indicate his position among the 'Suffering Remnant' by calling him 'a Cameronian Apostle;' for, during the long period of 36 years, he was the sole ordained minister among the scattered congregations of the 'Society' people. The name seems not unfitting, and it receives a certain sanction from the authority of Dr. Cunningham, who styled him the 'high-priest' of the Societies . . . Further, Macmillan's story is also the record of the development of a most interesting side of Scottish Church life. He may be said, indeed, to have made the history of what, at last, became the Reformed Presbyterian Church. This is so true, that that Church long bore the popular name of the 'Macmillanites.' And the name of Macmillan is bound up with more than one congregation still existing.' An important book for those who would trace the backsliding of modern Presbyterianism (the neopresbyterians), and also be encouraged by the remnant of those who remain faithful to the position of the original Covenanters (the paleopresbyterians). This book's 308 pages includes illustrations and a detailed appendix containing important church documents." -- Publisher

Richman, Sheldon, Separating School and State: How to Liberate America's Families, ISBN: 0964044714.
"Sheldon Richman presents us with a fascinating story here. Why were public schools first founded? Because people were illiterate? No. Records from colonial times show that literacy rates were higher than they are now in some places. There were all kinds of instructors, schools, schoolmasters, tutors, and self-taught leaders like Benjamin Franklin, and Alexander Hamilton, at the time of the American Revolution. There was tremendous resistance, well into the 20th century against government-owned, operated, and controlled "free schools." And no wonder. We now have an established school system that manifests all the problems the Founders saw inherent in an established church. The arguments the promoters gave are presented here, and some of then are pretty scary. The goals of the public school founders had more to do with the state's interests, than children's or family's interests. The idea was to indoctrinate children with the morality preferred by "politically correct" officials of the time. Compulsory laws came in when labor unions wanted to keep kids from competing for jobs. The opponents give their side here, too. Like a lot of people, I did not know much about the history of public schools before I started reading books like this one. I have come to agree with this author. This is an excellent argument for freedom of education, and giving control back to families and parents." -- Reader's Comment

Richman, Sheldon , Richard M. Ebeling (introduction), Walter E. Williams, Your Money or Your Life: Why we Must Abolish the Income Tax, ISBN: 0964044781 9780964044784.
"Sheldon Richman's concise and informative book, YOUR MONEY OR YOUR LIFE, explains how the income tax is one of the greatest threats to the liberty of the American people ever devised. By making our employers surrogate federal tax collectors, most Americans don't feel the pain because they really don't know what they're losing. But even worse, as Richman points out, by having access to our paychecks, the government can tap into an almost limitless pool of money to expand its size and scope. We need to scrap the income tax and replace it with a tax on consumption." -- Reader's Comment

*Robbins, John W. (1949-2008), Ecclesiastical Megalomania: The Economic and Political Thought of the Roman Catholic Church, ISBN: 0940931753 9780940931756.
"This book is a detailed examination of the official statements of the Vatican on economic and political matters. It demonstrates the collectivism and totalitarianism of the Roman Catholic Church-State. It is the only such book written by a Christian in the twentieth century.
"This book explores the conflict between Roman Catholic social thought and human freedom, relying on official pronouncements from the Vatican to show that the political and economic theory of the Roman Church-State justifies feudalism, corporativism, liberation theology, the welfare state, and fascism.
"Dr. John W. Robbins attended Grove City College (A.B. 1969), and The Johns Hopkins University (M.A. 1970, Ph.D. 1973). He has served as chief of staff for a Member of Congress [Ron Paul of Texas], editor of The Freeman magazine, Economist for The Heritage Foundation, and Professor of Political Philosophy in The Freedom School." -- Publisher

Power tends to corrupt and absolute power corrupts absolutely. Great men are almost always bad men, even when they exercise influence and not authority: still more when you superadd the tendency or the certainty of corruption by authority. -- John Emerich Edward Dalberg, Lord Acton (1834-1902), in a letter to Mandell Creighton, April 5, 1887, quoted by Gertrude Himmelfarb in Acton, Essays ons Freedom and Power, pp. 335-36 (1972)
"As the world focuses it attention on the papacy, we ought to recall Lord Acton, the great Roman Catholic historian of the 19th century. Many have heard the aphorism, 'Power tends to corrupt; absolute power corrupts absolutely,' though it is usually misquoted as 'Power corrupts.' Few who have heard it, however, know who its author was: John Emerich Edward Dalberg, better known as Lord Acton. Fewer still realize that Acton used the aphorism in opposing the papacy, the absolute monarchy of the Roman Catholic Church.
"Acton's criticisms of the papacy and the Roman Church are some of most damning ever leveled against those institutions, and they are virtually unknown today. Yet to anyone seriously concerned about religious and political freedom, Acton's views on the Roman Church, his own church, in particular his condemnation of the papacy, ought to be of great interest. Unfortunately, contemporary theological correctness has a taboo against criticism of Catholicism.
"Acton kept a notebook on the Inquisition in which he wrote:
[The] object of the Inquisition [was] not to combat sin -- for the sin was not judged by it unless accompanied by [theological] error. Nor even to put down error. For it punished untimely and unseemly remarks the same as blasphemy. Only unity. This became an outward, fictitious, hypocritical unity. The gravest sin was pardoned, but it was death to deny the donation of Constantine. [The Donation of Constantine was a document forged in the eighth century in which the Roman Emperor Constantine willed the Western Roman Empire to the Pope. The Roman Church taught that the Donation was genuine, and the legal basis for the pope's civil authority, for centuries. -- JR]. So men learnt that outward submission must be given. All this [was] to promote authority more than faith. When ideas were punished more severely than actions -- for all this time the Church was softening the criminal law, and saving men from the consequences of crime: -- and the Donation was put on a level with God's own law -- men understood that authority went before sincerity.
"Acton believed that the Inquisition was the institution by which the medieval papacy had to be condemned or acquitted. Just as a man charged with murder is judged for a single act, though be may be kind to his mother and a great philanthropist, so the papacy must be judged for the Inquisition. To Mandell Creighton, an Anglican priest, Acton wrote:
I cannot accept your canon that we are to judge Pope and King unlike other men, with a favourable presumption that they did no wrong. If there is any presumption it is the other way, against holders of power, increasing as the power increases. Historic responsibility has to make up for the want of legal responsibility. Power tends to corrupt, and absolute power corrupts absolutely. Great men are almost always bad men, even when they exercise influence and not authority: still more when you superadd the tendency or the certainty of corruption by authority. There is no worse heresy than that the office sanctifies the holder of it. . . . For many years my view of Catholic controversy has been governed by the following chain of reasoning: 1. A crime does not become a good deed by being committed for the good of a church. 2. The theorist who approves the act is no better than the culprit who commits it. 3. The divine or historian who defends the theorist incurs the same blame. . . . To commit murder is the mark of a moment, exceptional. To defend it is constant, and shows a more perverted conscience.
"Acton turned his attention to other crimes of the Roman Church as well. Beginning on Sunday, August 24, 1572, tens of thousands of French Huguenots were massacred by the Catholics. Overnight, thousands were murdered, and the murders continued for several months. The massacre began in Paris. The sign of the cross was everywhere, and the murders took on the air of a crusade, a holy war against the infidels. The banks of the Seine became a slaughterhouse. Men, women, children, and infants were stabbed or dragged by a rope around the neck to be thrown into the river. The murder, looting, and rape went on for days in Paris.
"The Pope, Gregory XIII, reacted immediately to this Catholic Holocaust: He delivered a complimentary speech, and commended the King of France, Charles IX, who 'has also displayed before our Most Holy Master and this entire assembly the most splendid virtues which can shine in the exercise of power.' The Pope commissioned a mural in honor of the great occasion; he ordered salutes fired for Charles; he had a commemorative seal struck; and in a horrible blasphemy he ordered a special Te Deum sung. Less than two years later, at the age of 24, King Charles died in extreme pain with blood oozing from his pores. His last words were pleas to God for pardon for the murders.
"The massacre was a matter of controversy in 1868 when Acton wrote an essay in the North British Review. He concluded his long essay by saying that there was no evidence to absolve the Roman Church of premeditated murder. Acton argued that it was not only facts that condemned the papacy for this heinous crime, but the whole body of casuistry developed by the church that made it an act of Christian duty and mercy to kill a heretic so that he might be removed from sin. Acton pointed out that only when the Roman Church could no longer rely on force but had to make its case before public opinion did it seek to explain away its murders. 'The same motive which had justified the murder now promoted the lie,' he wrote. A bodyguard of lies was fabricated to protect the papacy from guilt for this monstrous sin. Acton wrote:
The story is much more abominable than we all believed. . . . S.B. [St. Bartholomew's], is the greatest crime of modern times. It was committed on principles professed by Rome. It was approved, sanctioned, and praised by the papacy. The Holy See went out of its way to signify to the world, by permanent and solemn acts, how entirely it admired a king who slaughtered his subjects treacherously, because they were Protestants. To proclaim forever that because a man is a Protestant it is a pious deed to cut his throat in the night. . . .
"For three centuries the Roman church's canon law had affirmed that the killing of an excommunicated person was not murder, and that allegiance need not be kept with heretical rulers. Murder and treason were part of the Roman church's official teachings. Charles IX was acting as a good Catholic, and he was highly praised by the pope for his murders.
"In 1867 Pope Pius IX summoned a general council of the Roman Church to be held in Rome in 1870. It was the first general council of the Roman Church since the sixteenth century Council of Trent, at which the schismatic Roman Church had condemned all the truths of the Reformation. This time the Pope was determined to establish himself as the infallible sovereign of the Roman Church.
"Acton thought that the time of the council would be better spent abolishing many of the 'reforms' made by the Council of Trent, reforms which had perpetuated in the Roman Church a spirit of intolerant absolutism and 'austere immorality.' He opposed the doctrine of papal infallibility, because, as an historian, he knew the popes were not infallible. Acton wrote:
A man is not honest who accepts all the Papal decisions in questions of morality, for they have often been distinctly immoral; or who approves the conduct of the Popes in engrossing power, for it was stained with perfidy and falsehood; or who is ready to alter his convictions at their command, for his conscience is guided by no principle.
"After studying the history of the popes, Acton wrote:
The papacy contrived murder and massacre on the largest and also on the most cruel and inhuman scale. They were not only wholesale assassins but they made the principle of assassination a law of the Christian Church and a condition of salvation. . . . [The Papacy], is the fiend skulking behind the Crucifix.
Massachusetts Attorney General, The Sexual Abuse of Children in the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Boston, Thomas F. Reilly, Massachusetts Attorney General.
"The mistreatment of children was so massive and so prolonged that it borders on the unbelievable," says the July 23 [2003] report of Massachusetts Attorney General Thomas F. Reilly. More than 1,000 minors were likely abused by priests over the past six decades."
This is the 79-page report in its entirety.
http://www.votf.org/ago/archdiocese.pdf
Martin Luther, John Calvin, John Knox, Samuel Rutherford, John Owen, Thomas Manton, The Westminster Assembly, James Renwick, Archibald Mason, Christopher Ness, Francis Turretin, The Reformed Presbytery, David Steel, James R. Willson, Alexander M'Leod, William L. Roberts, James Aiken Wylie, Andrew Wilet, Henry Wilkinson, James Wylie, Patrick Fairbairn, James Aiken, Andrew Wilet, Alexander Hislop, Francis Nigel Lee, Arthur W. Pink, and so forth, and so on, have all believed and argued in print that the seated Pope is the Antichrist of the Bible.
The Roman Church-State is "the world's oldest, largest, most powerful and most influential politico-ecclesiastical institution" and it "may also be the world's wealthiest." The Roman Catholic Institution is the ultimate "negative guide to the positive," the reformers ultimate "opposite guide to political and economic reform." The Roman Catholic Institution is the ultimate "negative guide to the positive," the reformers ultimate "opposite guide to political and economic reform."
Pope's visit means 3 White House firsts.
President says 'man of faith' and conviction deserves the special treatment

Associated Press, April 13, 2008
"WASHINGTON -- The leader of the world's 1 billion Roman Catholics has been to the White House only once in history. That changes this week, and President Bush is pulling out all the stops: driving out to a suburban military base to meet Pope Benedict XVI's plane, bringing a giant audience to the South Lawn and hosting a fancy East Room dinner.
"These are all firsts.
"A crowd of up to 12,000 is due at the White House on Wednesday morning for the pope's official, pomp-filled arrival ceremony. It will feature the U.S. and Holy See anthems, a 21-gun salute, and the U.S. Army Old Guard Fife and Drum Corps. Both men will make remarks before their Oval Office meeting and a send-off for his popemobile down Pennsylvania Avenue.
"The president explained the special treatment -- particularly the airport greeting.
" 'One, he speaks for millions. Two, he doesn't come as a politician; he comes as a man of faith,' Bush told the EWTN Global Catholic Network in an interview aired Friday. He added that he wanted to honor Benedict's conviction that 'there's right and wrong in life, that moral relativism has a danger of undermining the capacity to have more hopeful and free societies. . . .' "
"This week makes Bush the record-holder, with a total of five meetings with two popes. . . ."
"The current pope's approach may be softer than that of John Paul, who turned from Bush's presentation to him of the Medal of Freedom in 2004 to read a statement about his 'grave concern' over events in Iraq."
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/24096388/
Bush Scandals
An extensive resource. Includes websites for the Savings and Loan Scandal of the 1980s, considered the largest theft in the history of the world, involving Neil Bush, a brother of George W., the Florida's Voting Scandal of 2001 in which Al Gore lost the presidential election. Jeb Bush, another brother of George W., was Governor of Florida and had promised to deliver the state for his brother. Other sites treat George W. Bush's suspected involvement in 911 [911 is, of course, analagous to Roosevelt's Pearl Harbor]. Note particularly "Bush Family Machinations, 1918-2000," a timeline of Bush Family crimes prior to Election 2000.
http://news4florida.tripod.com/index1.html
The Panic of '08. Lew Rockwell Interviews Ron Paul, September 18, 2008
A podcast.
http://www.lewrockwell.com/podcast/?p=episode&name=2008-09-18_029_ron_paul_talks_to_lew_rockwell.mp3

*Roberts, William Louis (1798-1864), The Duty of Nations, in Their National Capacity, to Acknowledge and Support the True Religion, 1853. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #1, #27.
"Excerpted from THE REFORMED PRESBYTERIAN CATECHISM below, this book deals with the inescapable necessity, of the demand found in the Word of God, for the Civil establishment of Christ as King and Lawgiver over every nation on earth. If you are sick of the cease-fire with humanism, set forth by the syncretistic, Satanic and pragmatic pagan politicians of our day (those who bargain with votaries of Antichrist [the Pope], publicly tolerate all manner of false religions (e.g. Islam) and idolatry, and comprise their policy and draw their pretended authority from the beast [and not the Word of God], this book is for you! For all pagan politics is summed up in the words of the Cameronian (Covenanter) political philosopher Alexander Shields, as 'rotting away under the destructive distempers of detestable neutrality, loathsome lukewarmness, declining, and decaying in corruptions, defections, divisions, distractions, confusions; and so judicially infatuated with darkness and delusions, that they forget and forego the necessary testimony of the day.' (A Hind let Loose, 1797 edition, p. 20). Pick up this book and begin the political walk in the 'footsteps of the flock,' traveling the covenanting road of Reformation and Scripture (with the magisterial Reformers of the past)!" -- Publisher
On the Duty of Covenanting and the Permanent Obligations of Religious Covenants, being section 11 in the Reformed Presbyterian Catechism, 1853, by William L. Roberts
http://www.swrb.com/newslett/actualnls/PresCatCov.htm
A Hind Let Loose; Or An Historical Representation of the Testimonies of the Church of Scotland. . . . by Mr. Alexander Shields, Minister of the Gospel, in St. Andrews
http://www.truecovenanter.com/shields/
A Hind let Loose: or, An Historical Representation of the Testimonies of the Church of Scotland, for the Interest of Christ: With the True State Thereof in all its Periods, Shields, Alexander
http://archive.org/details/hindletlooseorhi00shie
Reformed Presbyterian Catechism, William L. Roberts D.D.
http://archive.org/details/ReformedPresbyterianCatechism

Roberts, William Louis, D.D. (1798-1864), The Higher Law, or, The Law of the Most High: A Discourse, Delivered at the Baptist Church, in Sterling Centre, Wednesday Evening, Jan. 22d, 1851.

*Roberts, William Louis (1798-1864), The Reformed Presbyterian Catechism, ISBN: 0524065543 9780524065549. A Christian classic. Considered to be among the ten greatest books in the English language. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available from ATLA 1991-2638.
A magnificent catechism that sets forth the Crown Rights of The King of Glory and Lord of Lords. It also presents incontrovertible evidence that the United States Constitution is not a Christian document, and that it is, in fact, a slavery document.
"A manual of instruction, drawing from such notable authors as William Symington and J.R. Willson, presenting 'arguments and facts confirming and illustrating the 'Distinctive Principles' of the Reformed Presbyterian Church. Chapters deal with: 'Christ's Mediatorial Dominion in General;' Christ's Exclusive Headship Over the Church;' 'The Supreme and Ultimate Authority of the Word of God in the Church;' Civil Government, the Moral Ordinance of God;' Christ's Headship Over the Nations;' 'The Subjection of the Nations to God and to Christ;' The Word, or Revealed Will of God, the Supreme Law in the State;' 'The Duty of Nations, in Their National Capacity, to Acknowledge and Support the True Religion:' 'The Spiritual Independence of the Church of Christ:' 'The Right and Duty of Dissent From an Immoral Constitution of Civil Government;' 'The Duty of Covenanting, and the Permanent Obligations of Religious Covenants;' 'The Application of These Principles to the Governments, Where Reformed Presbyterians Reside, in the Form of a Practical Testimony;' and finally 'Application of the Testimony to the British Empire. . . '." -- Publisher
Reformed Presbyterian Catechism, William L. Roberts D.D.
http://archive.org/details/ReformedPresbyterianCatechism
Roberts, William, On the Mediatorial Dominion of The Lord Jesus Christ, excerpted from THE REFORMED PRESBYTERIAN CATECHISM.
http://www.truecovenanter.com/reformedpresbyterian/roberts_rp_catechism_section_01_mediatorial_dominion.html
Roberts, William, The Exclusive Headship of The Lord Jesus Christ Over the Church of God, excerpted from the REFORMED PRESBYTERIAN CATECHISM.
http://www.truecovenanter.com/reformedpresbyterian/roberts_rp_catechism_section_02_christs_headship_over_the_church.html
Roberts, William, Civil Government the Moral Ordinance of God, excerpted from THE REFORMED PRESBYTERIAN CATECHISM.
http://www.truecovenanter.com/reformedpresbyterian/roberts_rp_catechism_section_04_civil_government.html
Roberts, William, On Christ's Headship Over the Nations, excerpted from THE REFORMED PRESBYTERIAN CATECHISM.
http://www.truecovenanter.com/reformedpresbyterian/roberts_rp_catechism_section_05_christs_headship_over_nations.html
Roberts, William, The Subjection of the Nations to God and to Christ, excerpted from the REFORMED PRESBYTERIAN CATECHISM.
http://www.truecovenanter.com/reformedpresbyterian/roberts_rp_catechism_section_06_subjection_of_nations_to_christ.html
See also: The Scottish Covenanting Struggle, Alexander Craighead, and the Mecklenburg Declaration, SECRET PROCEEDINGS AND DEBATES OF THE CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION, CONSPIRACY IN PHILADELPHIA: THE ORIGINS OF THE U.S. CONSTITUTION, and A THEOLOGICAL INTERPRETATION OF AMERICAN HISTORY.

Roberts, William Louis, D.D. (1798-1864), Submission to "the powers that be" Scripturally Illustrated: A Discourse in Three Parts, 1828. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #26.

Robertson, James Patrick Bannerman, Right Hon. Lord President of the Court of Session, The Duty of Educated Intellect to the State. An address, 1895.

Robinson, John, Proofs of a Conspiracy Against all the Religions and Governments of Europe, Carried on in the Secret Meetings of Free Masons, Illuminati, and Reading Societies, ISBN: 0882791214 9780882791210. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #18.
"Utilizing original documents from the Order of the Illuminati, John Robinson describes in detail this secret group, whose select members became part of conspiracy to enslave all people in Europe and America. Originally published in 1798, this book is a definitive work of its time on conspiracy." -- American Opinion Books "Collected from good authorities, by John Robison, A.M. professor of natural philosophy, and secretary to the Royal Society of Edinburgh."

*Rushdoony, Rousas J. (1916-2001), Christianity and the State, ISBN: 9996717755. Available through Exodus Books.
"The need to return to a Biblical doctrine of civil government is evidenced by our century's worldwide drift into tyranny. Humanism invariably rushes in to fill the world's theological vacuums: the need of the hour is to restore a full-orbed, Biblical, theology of the state. This work sets forth that theology." -- GCB

*Rutherford, Samuel (1600-1661), The due Right of Presbyteries or a Peaceable Plea for the Government of the Church of Scotland, 1644. Alternate title: THE DIVINE RIGHT OF CHURCH-GOVERNMENT AND EXCOMMUNICATION: OR A PEACABLE DISPUTE FOR THE PERFECTION OF THE HOLY SCRIPTURE IN POINT OF CEREMONIES AND CHURCH GOVERNMENT; IN WHICH THE REMOVAL OF THE SERVICE-BOOK IS JUSTIFI'D, THE SIX BOOKS OF THO: ERASTUS AGAINST EXCOMMUNICATION ARE BRIEFLY EXAMIN'D; WITH A VINDICATION OF THAT EMINENT DIVINE THEOD: BEZA AGAINST THE ASPERSIONS OF ERASTUS, THE ARGUMENTS OF MR. WILLIAM PRYN, RICH: HOOKER, DR. MORTON, DR. JACKSON, DR. JOHN FORBES, AND THE DOCTORS OF ABERDEEN; TOUCHING WILL-WORSHIP, CEREMONIES, IMAGERY, IDOLATRY, THINGS INDIFFERENT, AN AMBULATORY GOVERNMENT; THE DUE AND JUST POWERS OF THE MAGISTRATE IN MATTERS OF RELIGION, AND THE ARGUMENTS OF MR. PRYN, IN SO FAR AS THEY SIDE WITH ERASTUS, ARE MODESTLY DISCUSSED. TO WHICH IS ADDED, A BRIEF TRACTATE OF SCANDAL; . . . BY SAMUEL RUTHERFURD, PROFESSOR OF DIVINITY IN THE UNIVERSITY OF ST. ANDREWS IN SCOTLAND. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #9 and #24.
"Almost 800 pages long, Rutherford here deals with church membership, separation from the visible church, the civil magistrate and religion, communion among churches, the errors of the independents (specifically in New England), and much more. This could be considered the LEX, REX of church government -- another exceedingly rare masterpiece of Presbyterianism! Characterized by Walker as sweeping 'over a wider field than most. Most essential points which Gillespie has barely touched, Rutherford carefully considers; as, for instance, the nature of the visible church as such, and its constituent elements. Even in the Erastian controversy he is a necessary supplement to his great contemporary. It is something to me altogether amazing, the mass of thinking about Church questions you have in those writings.' Bannerman, in his CHURCH OF CHRIST calls this a 'very learned and elaborate treatise.' Here is a sample of Mr. Rutherford's writing: 'A private subtraction and separation from the Ministry of a known wolf and seducer, . . . this the Law of nature will warrant . . . as Parker saith from Saravia, 'it is lawful to use that blameless and just defence, if the bad church-guide cannot be deposed.' So the son may save himself by a just defence in fleeing from his mad father, or his distracted friend coming to kill him. Now this defence is not an authoritative act, nor a judicial act of authority, but a natural act that is common to any private person, yea to all without the true Church as well as within to take that care in extreme necessity, for the safety of their souls, that they would do for the safety of their bodies' (1642), cited in The Original Covenanter and Contending Witness magazine." -- Publisher
The Covenant Between God and Kings, from A DEFENSE OF LIBERTY
http://www.constitution.org/vct/vindiciae1a.htm

*Rutherford, Samuel (1600-1661), A Free Disputation Against Pretended Liberty of Conscience, 1649. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #9, #25, and #26.
"Rutherford's FREE DISPUTATION, though scarce, is still one of his most important works with maybe only a few copies of the actual book left in existence. Though Rutherford is affectionately remembered in our day for his LETTERS, or for laying the foundations of constitutional government (against the divine right of kings), in his unsurpassed LEX, REX his FREE DISPUTATION should not be overlooked for it contains the same searing insights as LEX, REX. In fact, this book should probably be known as Rutherford's 'politically incorrect' companion volume to LEX, REX. A sort of sequel aimed at driving pluralists and antinomians insane. Written against 'the Belgick Arminians, Socinians, and other Authors contending for lawlesse liberty, or licentious Tolerations of Sects and Heresies,' Rutherford explains the undiluted Biblical solution to moral relativism, especially as it is expressed in ecclesiastical and civil pluralism! (Corporate pluralism being a violation of the first commandment and an affront to the holy God of Scripture). He also deals with conscience, toleration, penology (punishment), and the judicial laws, as related to both the civil and ecclesiastical realms. Excellent sections are also included which address questions related to determining the fundamentals of religion, how covenants bind us, the perpetual obligation of social covenants (with direct application to the Solemn League and Covenant and the covenant-breaking of Cromwell and his sectarian supporters), whether the punishing of seducing teachers be persecution of conscience, and much more. Walker adds these comments and context regarding Rutherford's FREE DISPUTATION, 'The principle of toleration was beginning to be broached in England, and in a modified shape to find acceptance there. Samuel Rutherford was alarmed, or rather, I should say, he was horrified, for he neither feared the face of man or argument. He rushed to the rescue of the good old view . . . It is not so easy to find a theoretical ground for toleration; and Rutherford has many plausible things to say against it. With the most perfect confidence, he argues that it is alike against Scripture and common sense that you should have two religions side by side. It is outrageous ecclesiastically, it is sinful civilly. He does not, however, take what I call the essentially persecuting ground. He does not hold that the magistrate is to punish religion as religion. Nay, he strongly maintains that the civil magistrate never aims at the conscience. The magistrate, he urges, does not send anyone, whether a heretic (who is a soul murderer -- RB), or a murderer, to the scaffold with the idea of producing conversion or other spiritual result, but to strengthen the foundations of civil order. But if he gives so much power to the king, he is no lover of despotism withal: the king himself must be under law. To vindicate this great doctrine is the object of another book, the celebrated LEX, REX; of which it has been said by one competent to judge, that it first clearly developed the constitutionalism which all men now accept.' (Theology and Theologians . . . pp. 11-12). In our day Francis Schaeffer, and numerous others, have critiqued many of the problems found in modern society, but most have spent little time developing explicitly Biblical solutions especially regarding the theoretical foundations that Rutherford addresses here. Rutherford's FREE DISPUTATION provides a detailed blueprint for laying the foundations that must be laid before any lasting, God-honoring solutions will be found. Furthermore, Rutherford and his writings were the enemies of all governments not covenanted with Christ. This book will give you a very clear picture as to why 'the beast' (civil and ecclesiastical), has reserved his special hatred for such teaching. As Samuel Wylie noted 'the dispute, then, will not turn upon the point whether religion should be civilly established . . . but it is concerning what religion ought to be civilly established and protected, -- whether the religion of Jesus alone should be countenanced by civil authority, or every blasphemous, heretical, and idolatrous abomination which the subtle malignity of the old serpent and a heart deceitful above all things and desperately wicked, can frame and devise, should be put on an equal footing therewith." -- The Two Sons of Oil; or, the Faithful Witness for Magistracy and Ministry Upon a Scriptural Basis. Can our generation swallow Rutherford's hard, anti-pluralistic, Covenanter medicine, poured forth from the bottle of the first commandment, without choking on their carnal dreams of a free and righteous society divorced from God (and His absolute claims upon everyone and everything)? Not without the enabling power of the Holy Spirit -- that is for sure! In summary, this book answers all the hardest questions theonomists (and their wisest and best opponents), have been asking for the last 20-30 years (and these answers are much more in depth than any we have seen in the last couple of millennia [less about a century to account for the apostles]). As the reader will discover, Rutherford was a wealthy man when it came to wisdom (and much advanced theologically), and those who take the time to gaze into the King's treasure house, as exhibited in this book, will find that they are greatly rewarded. Furthermore, because of its uncompromising stand upon the Word of God, this book is sure to be unpopular among a wicked and adulterous generation. However, on the other hand, it is sure to be popular among the covenanted servants of King Jesus! This is one of the best books (in the top five anyway), for advanced study of the Christian faith. We have now obtained an easy-to-read, amazingly clear copy of this very rare, old treasure. Great price too, considering that a copy of the 1649 edition, containing this quality of print, would likely cost upwards of $1000 on the rare book market -- though it is unlikely you would ever see a copy for sale!" -- Publisher
A Brotherly and Free Epistle to the Patrons and Friends of Pretended Liberty of Conscience, Samuel Rutherford
http://www.truecovenanter.com/anti_toleration/rutherfurd_epistle_against_pretendedlibertyofconscience.html
The Covenant Between God and Kings, from A DEFENSE OF LIBERTY
http://www.constitution.org/vct/vindiciae1a.htm

*Rutherford, Samuel (1600-1661), Lex, rex, or The law and the Prince, ISBN: 0873779517. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #10, #25.
" 'Lex, rex' is Latin for 'law is king.'
"LEX, REX is 'the great political text of the Covenanters.' (Johnston citing Innes in Treasury of the Scottish Covenant, p. 305). 'Rutherford was the first to formulate the great constitutional principle Lex est Rex -- the law is King . . . much of the doctrine has become the constitutional inheritance of all countries in modern times.'
"Gilmour writes [in SAMUEL RUTHERFORD], 'that, as regards religious fervour, scholastic subtlety of intellect, and intensity of ecclesiastical conviction, Samuel Rutherford is the most distinctively representative Scotsman in the first half of the seventeenth century'." -- Publisher
"Without a doubt one of the greatest books on political philosophy ever written. Rutherford here has penned a great Christian charter of liberty against all forms of civil tyranny -- vindicating the Scriptural duty to resist tyrants as an act of loyalty to God." -- Publisher
"That resistance to lawful authority -- even when that authority so called has, in point of fact, set at nought 'all law' -- is in no instance to be vindicated, will be held by those only who are the devotees of arbitrary power and passive obedience. The principles of Mr. Rutherford's LEX, REX, however obnoxious they may be to such men, are substantially the principles on which all government is founded, and without which the civil magistrate would become a curse rather than a blessing to a country. They are the very principles which lie at the basis of the British Constitution, and by whose tenure the House of Brunswick does at this very moment hold possession of the throne of these realms." -- Rev. Robert Burns, D.D., in his "Preliminary Dissertation" to Wodrow's Church History
Additional sources of text related to LEX REX are as follows:
"Though Rutherford is affectionately remembered in our day for his LETTERS, or for laying the foundations of constitutional government (against the divine right of kings), in his unsurpassed LEX, REX, his FREE DISPUTATION should not be overlooked, for it contains the same searing insights as LEX, REX. In fact, this book [A FREE DISPUTATION AGAINST PRETENDED LIBERTY OF CONSCIENCE -- compiler] should probably be known as Rutherford's 'politically incorrect' companion volume to LEX, REX. It is a sort of sequel aimed at driving pluralists and antinomians insane. Written against 'the Belgick Arminians, Socinians, and other Authors contending for lawless liberty, or licentious Tolerations of Sects and Heresies,' Rutherford explains the undiluted Biblical solution to moral relativism, especially as it is expressed in ecclesiastical and civil pluralism! (Corporate pluralism being a violation of the first commandment, and an affront to the holy God of Scripture)." -- Publisher
A HIND LET LOOSE by Alexander Shields is sometimes referred to as 'Lex, Rex, Volume Two.'
A Hind Let Loose; or An Historical Representation of the Testimonies of the Church of Scotland. . . . by Mr. Alexander Shields, Minister of the Gospel, in St. Andrews
http://www.truecovenanter.com/shields/
A Hind let Loose; or, An Historical Representation of the Testimonies of the Church of Scotland, for the Interest of Christ
"This book sets forth the Crown rights of King Jesus, against all usurpers in both church and state, giving a history of some of faithful sufferings endured by the elect, in maintaining this truth." -- Publisher
http://archive.org/details/hindletlooseorhi00shie
"This [THE DUE RIGHT OF PRESBYTERIES OR A PEACEABLE PLEA FOR THE GOVERNMENT OF THE CHURCH OF SCOTLAND -- compiler], could be considered the LEX, REX of church government -- another exceedingly rare masterpiece of Presbyterianism! Characterized by Walker as sweeping 'over a wider field than most'." -- Publisher
Rutherford, Samuel (1600-1661), Lex, rex: The law and the Prince, a Dispute for the Just Prerogative of King and People. (1843)
http://archive.org/details/lexrexlawandpri00ruthgoog
Lex, rex, or The law and the Prince, Samuel Rutherford
"Rutherford is to be praised for his teaching that the king is subject to the law of God. The Bible has nothing but condemnation for those who frame mischief by a law and declares rhetorically, Shall the throne of iniquity have fellowship with thee? (Psalm 94:20). Deuteronomy 17 is the classic passage in defense of LEX, REX, wherein the king is charged to read therein all the days of his life: that he may learn to fear the Lord his God, to keep all the words of this law. (Deuteronomy 17:19)." -- Publisher
http://www.constitution.org/sr/lexrex.htm
Lex, rex: The law and the Prince, a Dispute for the Just Prerogative of King and People, containing the reasons and causes of the defensive wars of the kingdom of Scotland, and of their expedition for the ayd and help of their brethren of England. In which a full answer is given to a seditious pamphlet, intituled, Sacro-sancta regum majestas, penned by J. Maxwell. By S. Rutherford. [Followed by], De jure regni apud Scotos; a dialogue, tr. by R. Macfarlan (repr. from the ed. of 1799).
http://books.google.com/books?id=jtYDAAAAQAAJ&ie=ISO-8859-1&output=html
The Covenant Between God and Kings, from A DEFENSE OF LIBERTY
http://www.constitution.org/vct/vindiciae1a.htm

*Schwertley, Brian M., and Westminster Presbyterian Church in the United States. Publications Committee, National Covenanting and Christ's Victory Over the Nations. Available at Reformed Online.
"This is the first book-length, scholarly exposition and defense of national covenanting since 1843. This comprehensive treatment includes the binding nature of covenants, covenant renewals under the godly kings of Israel, objections to covenanting answered, the unbiblical nature of the U.S. Constitution, the unscriptural alteration of the Westminster Confession of Faith in 1789, the necessity of the Old Testament moral law for a Christian nation and the biblical requirements for civil office. In the book, Rev. Schwertley not only sets forth the biblical case for social or national covenanting in a simple and organized manner but also critiques the modern pluralistic alternatives to the original Presbyterian teaching on this topic." -- Publisher
It was preceded by 'Social Covenanting,' a series of 31 sermons in MP3 format, given by the author starting in the summer of 2012.
Social Covenanting series of 31 sermons by Brian Schwertley
http://www.sermonaudio.com/search.asp?seriesOnly=true&currSection=sermonstopic&sourceid=ccc&keyword=National+Covenanting&keyworddesc=National+Covenanting

*Shaw, J.W., Hephzibah Beulah. Our Covenants the National and Solemn League; and Covenanting by the Reformed Presbyterian Synod in America: Considered, 1872. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #27.
"A very useful, easy-to-read, introductory work (by an RPCNA minister), to the topics it deals with. General Scriptural principles upon which this book is based are:

1. Departure from former laudable attainments, is a great evil, severely threatened in the Holy Scriptures; and that for which every one, who is guilty, must be accountable to the Righteous Judge of all the earth.
2. They who consent unto the unrighteous deeds of others, are chargeable with guilt, as well as the principal actors.
3. Societies, or individuals, having once publicly and solemnly vowed unto the Most High God; and still, after the strictest enquiry, remain satisfied in their own mind, that their vows were scriptural; should seriously endeavor to act up to the true spirit and intention of these vows; and no power upon earth, nor any class of men, whether majority or minority, in a nation, can ever possibly dissolve the obligation.
"Chapters include: The National Covenant and Solemn League and Covenant reviewed; Their Binding Obligations Shown; The Possibility That Adherence to Them may be Professed, While They are Virtually Abandoned; The Covenant Sworn and Subscribed by Synod at Pittsburgh, May 27th, 1871; Is it a Renovation or a new Covenant?; The Covenant Does not Contain all That the Church is Bound to in America; Charges Against the Covenant; Reason why Some who do not Like it, Swear it; The Covenants National and Solemn League Must Be Maintained." -- Publisher
Shaw, Rev. J.W., Hephzibah Beulah our Covenants the National and Solemn League; And Covenanting by the Reformed Presbyterian Synod in America: Considered
http://truecovenanter.com/covenants/shaw_hephzibah_beulah.html

*Smith, B.M., Family Religion, or the Domestic Relations as Regulated by Christian Principles (1859). Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #22.
"Smith's family was greatly influenced by Samuel Davies. Smith himself was a friend of R.L. Dabney. As the editor notes, the importance of this book is seen in the fact that 'reform of the family would soon diffuse itself throughout the whole constitution of society, a higher tone of morals would be inspired, and not only would the moral influence of the church be enlarged, but the stability and security of the state would be perpetuated.' Or as the DIRECTORY FOR FAMILY WORSHIP, appended to the Westminster Confession, so wisely points out, 'besides the public worship in congregations, mercifully established in this land in great purity, it is expedient and necessary that secret worship of each person alone, and private worship of families, be pressed and set up; that, with national reformation, the profession and power of godliness, both personal and domestic, be advanced.' This was a prize winning essay, covering, in depth, the family and its duties." -- Publisher

*Steele, David (1803-1887, editor), Reformed Presbytery of North America, The Contending Witness (vol. 1:1 -- 2:6, Apr. 1841 to Feb. 1843), The Reformation Advocate (vol. 1:1 -- 1:12, March 1874 to Dec. 1876), The Original Covenanter (vol. 2:1 -- 2:16, March 1877 to Dec. 1880), and The Original Covenanter (vol. 3:1 -- 3:16, March 1881 to Dec. 1884). Available (all four volumes, a complete set of this continuous periodical under its various names) on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available (all four volumes, a complete set of this continuous periodical under its various names) on Reformation Bookshelf CD #18.
"The following list [complete and found above -- compiler] of [continuous issues under various names -- compiler] magazines, edited by David Steele, comprise what is likely the best compilation of Christian periodicals ever amassed under one set of bindings. Nothing we know of (before or since), authored as magazine articles related to full-orbed nation shaking biblical Reformation, even comes close to the consistent quality of writing found in these short works on various subjects. Steele himself should probably be considered the best theologian of the nineteenth century, and the other contributors to these magazines were all approaching the same class. A healthy portion of Steele's writing is found in these magazines, as he only wrote a few other books, so the reading is encouraged to sample for himself some of the best writing (defending the Covenanted Reformation), you will find anywhere!" -- Publisher
Various excerpted articles may be found elsewhere in the topical listing for David Steele.
David Steele (editor), The Reformation Advocate, vol. 1, September 1874, no. 3, "Has the Government of the United States a Christian Character?"
http://www.gcpublications.com/Documents/The%20Reformation%20Advocate/5_Has%20the%20US%20a%20Christian%20Character.pdf
David Steele (editor), The Reformation Advocate, vol. 1, December 1874, no. 4, Signs of the Times
http://www.gcpublications.com/Documents/The%20Reformation%20Advocate/6_Signs%20of%20The%20Times.pdf
David Steele (editor), The Reformation Advocate, vol. 1, March 1874, no. 1, "To our Patrons"
http://www.gcpublications.com/Documents/The%20Reformation%20Advocate/1_To%20Our%20Patrons.pdf
David Steele (editor), The Reformation Advocate, vol. 1, June 1874, no. 2, "Christmas Trees"
http://www.gcpublications.com/Documents/The%20Reformation%20Advocate/4_Christmas%20Trees.pdf
David Steele (editor), The Reformation Advocate, vol. 1, March 1874, no. 1, "Are Hymns Idols"
http://www.gcpublications.com/Documents/The%20Reformation%20Advocate/3_Are%20Hymns%20Idols.pdf

The Contending Witness magazine, Vol. 1:1-2:6, Apr. 1841 to Feb. 1843. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
The Reformation Advocate magazine, Vol. 1:1-1:12, March 1874 to Dec. 1876. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
The Original Covenanter magazine, Vol. 2:1-2:16, March 1877 to Dec. 1880. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
The Original Covenanter magazine, Vol. 3:1-3:16, March 1881 to Dec. 1884. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
See also: Covenanted Reformed Presbyterian Publishing, The Best of The Original Covenanter and Contending Witness Magazine. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available from Covenanted Reformed Presbyterian Publishing.
http://www.covenanter.org

Stewart, James, Sir (1635-1715), Jus Populi Vindicatum, or, The Peoples Right to Defend Themselves and Their Covenanted Religion vindicated wherein the act of defence and vindication which was interprised anno 1666 is particularly justified . . . being a reply to the first part of Survey of Naphtaly &c. / by a friend to true Christian liberty, 1669. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #26.

*Symington, Andrew (1785-1862, the older brother of William), Headship of Christ Over the Nations, 1841. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #13, #25.
"Provides Scriptural evidences for Christ's headship over the nations and the church, demonstrating the importance of this doctrine to the kingdom of Christ. A lecture excerpted from the book LECTURES ON THE PRINCIPLES OF THE SECOND REFORMATION, edited by Andrew Symington." -- Publisher
Lectures on the Principles of the Second Reformation
http://www.covenanter.org/reformed/2015/8/18/the-reformed-presbyterian-churchs-of-scotland-lectures-on-the-principles-of-the-second-reformation

*Symington, William (1785-1853, the older brother of Andrew), Messiah the Prince or, The Mediatorial Dominion of Jesus Christ, ISBN: 0966004434 0921148054. The 1884 edition is available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Also available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #13, #25, and #26.
"It was deemed essential to the salvation of men that their Redeemer should possess the powers at once of a prophet, a priest, and a king. These offices, while essentially distinct, are necessarily and inseparably connected with one another. Such a union has been by some utterly denied; and its denial has laid foundation for some capital errors, which have exerted a pernicious influence on the Christian church. By others it has been criminally overlooked; and the neglect with which it has been treated has occasioned vague and conflicting conceptions regarding the great work of man's deliverance from sin and wrath by the mediation of the Son of God." -- William Symington
"It is the standard work on the kingdom of God in English! There is nothing else like it; it is one-of-a kind! It covers the necessity, reality, and qualifications of Christ's dominion over not only the church, but all nations too. Anything less is to rob Christ of His magnificent, majestic, mediatorial glory -- for He is the King of kings and Lord of lords. 'While books on the priestly work of the Redeemer, and especially on the Atonement, are numerous,' notes the introduction to the American edition, 'no formal and exhaustive discussion of the kingly office of the Messiah . . . and its application to various classes of moral agents is elsewhere to be found . . . It is cause for satisfaction that the only treatise, as yet, upon this subject, is a work of signal ability, lucid in arrangement, reverent in spirit, and with hardly an exception, sound and judicious in its conclusion. Its very merits are probably, in part, the reason why no other work on the same subject has appeared, and until it is supplanted by a better work -- an event not likely soon to occur -- it will have a value peculiar to itself'." -- Publisher
Chapters include "The Necessity of the Mediatorial Dominion," "The Universality of the Mediatorial Dominion," "The Mediatorial Dominion Over the Church," and "Over the Nations," plus much more.
Symington, William, Messiah the Prince or, The Meditorial Dominion of Jesus Christ (1881)
http://archive.org/details/messiahtheprince00symiuoft
Symington, William, Messiah the Prince or, The Mediatorial Dominion of Jesus Christ
Online free e-text of the 1999 Christian Statesman Press edition.
http://www.reformed.org/eschaton/symington/index.html?mainframe=/eschaton/symington/index_mtp.html
Symington, William, Messiah the Prince or, The Mediatorial Dominion of Jesus Christ
http://reformedchurchpublications.org/messiah_the_prince_by_william_symington.htm

*Symington, William (1795-1862), Nature and Obligation of Public Vows; With an Explanation and Defense of the British Covenants, 1841. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #27.
"More from the author of the classic MESSIAH THE PRINCE OR, THE MEDIATORIAL DOMINION OF JESUS CHRIST. A lecture excerpted from the book LECTURES ON THE PRINCIPLES OF THE SECOND REFORMATION, edited by Andrew Symington." -- Publisher
Lectures on the Principles of the Second Reformation
http://www.covenanter.org/reformed/2015/8/18/the-reformed-presbyterian-churchs-of-scotland-lectures-on-the-principles-of-the-second-reformation

*Symington, William (1795-1862), On the Atonement and Intercession of Jesus Christ, 1854. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #20.
"This is the companion volume to Symington's classic MESSIAH THE PRINCE OR, THE MEDIATORIAL DOMINION OF JESUS CHRIST. In part one, we find an extensive work comparing differing views regarding the nature, necessity, matter, value, extent, and result of the atonement. Part two deals with the reality, nature, matter, properties and results of the intercessory work of Christ. Encouraging and precise. Over 300 pages." -- Publisher
On the Atonement and Intercession of Jesus Christ. (1836), William Symington
http://archive.org/details/onatonementandi02symigoog
Nave's Topical Bible: Christ, Prayers of
http://bible.crosswalk.com/Concordances/naves-topical-bible/ntb.cgi?number=T2807

*Thornwell, James H. (1812-1862), Collected Writings of James Henley Thornwell, 4 volumes, ISBN: 0524059632 9780524059630. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.

Vol. I. LECTURES ON THE DOCTRINE OF GOD AND ON DIVINE GOVERNMENT (672 pages)
Vol. II. THE DOCTRINES OF GRACE; SERMONS; DISCOURSES ON TRUTH (632 pages)
Vol. III. THEOLOGICAL AND CONTROVERSIAL; RATIONALIST CONTROVERSY: REASON, REVELATION AND MIRACLES; PAPAL CONTROVERSY; BAPTISM, JUSTIFICATION, INFALLIBILITY, THE APOCRYPHA (824 pages)
Vol. IV. WRITINGS ON THE CHURCH: CHURCH OFFICERS; CHURCH OPERATIONS; CHURCH DISCIPLINES; THE SOUTHERN PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, ETC., SERMONS AND APPENDICES (640 pages)
"J.W. Alexander once wrote the following of one of Thornwell's sermons, 'His sermon was a model of what is rare, viz.: burning hot argument, logic in ignition, and glowing more and more to the end.'
"Henry Ward Beecher, the famous Northern liberal minister, wrote after Thornwell's death, 'By common fame, Dr. Thornwell was the most brilliant minister in the Old School Presbyterian Church, and the most brilliant debater in the General Assembly. This reputation he early gained and never lost. Whenever he was present in the Assembly, he was always the first person pointed out to a stranger.'
"Dr. D. Martyn Lloyd-Jones said of him, 'Thornwell was one of the greatest preachers that America has ever produced'." -- Publisher
See particularly, "Relation of the State to Christ" and "National Sins: a fast-day sermon, preached in the Presbyterian Church, Columbia, Wednesday, November 21, 1860.
THE RELATION OF THE STATE TO CHRIST "is the petition of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the Confederate States of America to the Congress of the Confederate States of America, then sitting in Richmond, Virginia. It argues that though the newly formed Confederate Constitution was admirable in many respects, it still laboured 'under one capital defect,' that being that it was not 'distinctively Christian.' It asks the Confederate Congress to 'express the precise relations which the Government of these States ought to sustain to the religion of Jesus Christ.' Suggests 'the following or equivalent terms, to be added to the section providing for liberty of conscience: Nevertheless we, the people of these Confederate States, distinctly acknowledge our responsibility to God, and the supremacy of His Son, Jesus Christ, as King of kings and Lord of lords; and hereby ordain that no law shall be passed by the Congress of these Confederate States inconsistent with the will of God, as revealed in the Holy Scripture'." -- Publisher

Thornwell, James H. (1812-1862), Relation of the State to Christ (A Memorial). Available in THE COLLECTED WORKS OF JAMES HENLEY THORNWELL. VOL. IV: ECCLESIASTICAL, pp. 549-56.

Thornwell, James Henley (1812-1862), The State of the Country: An Article Republished From "The Southern Presbyterian Review."

Thornwell, James Henley (1812-1862), The State and Nature of Sin. In COLLECTED WRITINGS OF JAMES HENLEY THORNWELL.

*Tocqueville, Alexis de, Democracy in America, 2 volumes, ISBN: 0060915226.
Translated by Henry Reeve and revised by Francis Bowen. Edited by Philip Bradley
"Tocqueville in the early part of the 19th century was commissioned by the French government to travel throughout the United States in order to discover the secret of the astounding success of this experiment in democracy. . . . A classic of political and sociological reporting and analysis . . ." -- Publisher
Democracy in America
http://xroads.virginia.edu/~HYPER/DETOC/home.html

*Vance, Laurence M., Christianity and War and Other Essays Against the Warfare State, ISBN: 0976344807 9780976344803.
"These thirteen essays have one thing in common -- they were all published on the premier anti-state, anti-war, pro-market website, LewRockwell.com. Ten of them were written exclusively for that website and have never appeared in print until now. Each essay is reprinted verbatim.
"LewRockwell.com is the brainchild of Lew Rockwell, the founder and president of the Ludwig von Mises Institute in Auburn, Alabama, and a leading opponent of the central state, its wars, and its socialism.
"Because they were published on the Internet, most of the essays originally contained numerous links to documentation and further information on the Web that the reader could click on if he desired. Because this feature is not possible in a printed format, the reader is encouraged to consult the online versions of each essay at LewRockwell.com, where, thanks to the wonders of technology, they are archived.
"These thirteen essays, organized under the headings of Christianity and War, The Evils of War, Specific Wars, and The U.S. Global Empire, have one underlying theme: opposition to the warfare state that robs us of our liberty, our money, and in some cases our life. Although many of these essays reference contemporary events, the principles discussed in all of them are timeless: war, militarism, empire, interventionism, the warfare state, and the Christian attitude toward these things. It is the author's contention that Christian enthusiasm for the state, its wars, and its politicians is an affront to the Saviour, contrary to Scripture, and a demonstration of the profound ignorance many Christians have of history." -- Publisher

Various, Sermons Before Parliament [Nov. 17, 1640 -- June 30, 1647], 5 volumes.
"Authors: Cornelius Burges; Stephen Marshall; Edmund Calamy; Simeon Ashe; Joseph Caryl; Cornelius Burges; Stephen Marshall; Edmund Calamy; Simeon Ashe; Joseph Caryl; Robert Harris; Obadiah Sedgwick; William Gouge; William Sedgwick; Edward Reynolds; Thomas Hill; William Carter; T Hodges; Thomas Wilson; Thomas Temple; Thomas Case; Richard Vines; Thomas Valentine; Edward Corbet; John Arrowsmith; Jeremiah Whitaker; W Bridges; John Ellis; John Lightfoot; John Ley; William Green-hill; Francis Cheynell; Thomas Carter; Herbert Palmer; Oliver Bowles; Matthew Newcomen; William Spurstowe; John Conant; Sidrach Simpson; Anthony Tuckney; Thomas Coleman; Humphrey Chambers; Anthony Burgess; Henry Wilkinson; Arthur Salwey; William Mewe; William Bridge; Alexander Henderson; John Strickland; Daniel Cawdry; Samuel Rutherford; Robert Baillie; Thomas Young; George Gillespie; John Bond; Edmund Staunton; John Greene; Peter Smith; Humphrey Hardwick; Gaspar Hickes; Stanley Gower; William Reyner; Christopher Tesdale; Francis Taylor; John Dury; Peter Sterry; John Foxcroft; William Strong; Thomas Goodwin; Simon Ford; Samuel Bolton; James Nalton; John Owen; Richard Heyrick; Jeremiah Burroughs; John Maynard; Nicholas Lockyer; William Dell; Lazarus Seaman; Nicolas Proffet; Henry Scudder; Benjamin Pikering; Joseph Boden; John Ward; Francis Woodcock; Nathaniel Ward; John Whincop." -- Publisher

*Willson, James McLeod (1809-1866), Civil Government: An Exposition of Romans 13:1-7 (1853), ISBN: 0524079293 9780524079294. Alternate title: THE ESTABLISHMENT AND LIMITS OF CIVIL GOVERNMENT: AN EXPOSITION OF ROMANS 13:1-7. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #25. Available in THE DEACON: AN INQUIRY INTO THE NATURE, DUTIES AND EXERCISE OF THE OFFICE OF DEACON, IN THE CHRISTIAN CHURCH.
"Does the Bible give any qualifications for Christians to judge whether or not a given civil magistrate is a lawful or unlawful 'power' in the eyes of God? Does the very existence of a civil 'power' (say Hitler's Nazi state), make them a legitimate government according to Romans 13? Or, can a civil government obtain its 'power' from 'the beast' -- as some 'churches' do? Should civil 'authorities' be judged according to the secret or revealed will of God? This is a fine piece of exegetical work, well nigh irrefutable, arguing that God has given clear revelation regarding the lawfulness and unlawfulness of any given civil magistrate. Willson's Scriptural conclusion will surprise many, anger not a few, and, we believe, be found honoring to God. Though the book is easy reading, these are deep waters with implications that are among the most far reaching. It is a very controversial publication based on the idea that 'unholy republics refuse to acknowledge Him (Christ) as Lord of all.' This failure to covenant with Christ, as nations, exposes the fact that these national governments are the enemies of Christ (as with the individual or church who will not covenant with Christ). They are thus in violation of the first commandment and therefore treasonous usurpers who will not have the one true king to rule over them. Their laws and actions bare this out, as they refuse to rule by the law of God, but rather, as dupes of Satan, rule by their own autonomous standards. And, though it is their duty to be a terror to evil and promote the good, they, in the main, do the opposite. They protect and support murders (e.g. abortionists), continence and permit perversity (e.g. homosexuality, pornography, etc.), and take no action to establish the Reformed faith (but rather extend constitution rights to all manner of cults, sectarians, satanists and Roman Catholics) -- to name but a few of the more obvious areas of government rebellion against King Jesus. Willson's father's application of the principles put forth in this book are found just below as they related to the United States government specifically. Knox, Rutherford and Gillespie would be proud!" -- Publisher
Civil Government: An Exposition of Romans 13:1-7
http://www.covenanter.org/reformed/2016/6/2/civil-government-an-eexposition-of-romans-xiii-1-7

Willson, James Renwick (1780-1853), The Shaking of the Nations, Alias the Anti-Christian Empire Overthrown, 1809.
The Shaking of the Nations, Alias the Anti-Christian Empire Overthrown
http://www.covenanter.org/JRWillson/jamesrenwickwillson.htm

Wilson, John F. (editor), Church and State in America: A Bibliographic Guide -- The Civil War to the Present, ISBN: 031325236X 9780313252365.

Woods, Dennis, Discipling the Nations: The Government Upon His Shoulder, ISBN: 1880692252 9781880692257.

Wood, Stephen D., Christ and Civil Government: An Exposition of Psalm 2, an article.
"The author answers questions concerning authority. Rather than go to the Constitution, The Declaration of Independence, rulings of the Supreme Court, the laws of the land, or the President he goes to the second Psalm [Psalm 2]. Here is where true authority resides; in the Word of God and the Christ He has placed on His throne!" -- GCB

Woodward, Park, The Triumph of Faith: or, Anti-Christian policy Detected in the Field of High Places, as Represented on the Stage of Divine Revelation, Both in the Old and New Testament, Being Displayed in the Form of a Dialogue Between Christian and Calvin, in Which Twelve Doctrinal Heads are Contended For.

*Wylie, James A. (1808-1890), History of The Scottish Nation, in 3 volumes. Available (PROTESTANTISM IN SCOTLAND), on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available (PROTESTANTISM IN SCOTLAND), on Reformation Bookshelf CD #1.
History of The Scottish Nation
http://www.reformation.org/history1.html

*Wylie, James A. (1808-1890), Story of the Covenant and the Service of the Covenanters to the Reformation in Christendom and the Liberties of Great Britain, 1880. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
"A fine historical introduction to the battle for Godly government and liberty against the forces of anti-Christian bondage (to national sin and Satanic deception). The Covenanters are responsible, more than any other group historically, for maintaining 'the crown rights of King Jesus' -- even at peril of severe torture and the loss of their earthly lives. Their covenanting principles are still the purest and most faithful form of Christianity known to man, and the revival of these eminently Biblical views are a sure hope for the future! For a more extensive 'Camerionian' treatment of this subject: Howie's SCOTS WORTHIES." -- Publisher

See also: The sovereignty of god, The doctrine of man (human nature, total depravity), Justice, the theology of judgment, god's final judgment, the great white throne judgment, the day of the lord, The mediatorial reign of christ: the crown rights of christ, Bible magistracy turns back the wrath of god, Church government, Power, Authority, Power religion, Covenanting in america, The utter failure of the u.s. constitution as a social deed of covenant, National establishment of religion: establishmentarianism, Selection of covenant heads for positions of authority, Christianity and democracy, The courts and the law base, Sermons preached before governing bodies, The religion of secular humanism, Islam (muslim/moslim), muhammadanism/mohammadanism, The counter reformation, Pseudo-christian movements: a selection of works, Justice, judgment, god's final judgment, the great white throne judgment, the day of the lord, The love and justice of god, Conspiracy and corruption, Sexual relationship, Friendly fascism, The banking system, The federal reserve, Meltdown 2008, the greatest depression in history, The destruction of american liberty, The decline of american society, irrationality, the decline of western thought, Biblical economics, State sovereignty and corporate immunity: reform of corporations, Modern myths and fallacies, The courts and the law base, Ethics, Medical ethics, Casuistry and conscience, Oaths, ensnaring (vows, promises, covenants), and bonds with the ungodly, Politics, The courts and the law base, Treason and impeachment,
Reform of the church, Unity and uniformity in the visible church: unity in the truth, Toleration, liberty of conscience, pluralism, and neutrality, Spiritual warfare, The westminster confession (1646), the westminster standards) and related works, The westminster confession of faith (1646) (the westminster standards) and related works: a study guide, The protestant reformation, Calvinism, Christ and civilization, A theological interpretation of american history, Freedom: a gift of God's Grace, The one and the many, The application of scripture to the corporate bodies of church and state, Persecution, Separation, Politics, The Counter Reformation,
The sovereign grace of god: his everlasting mercy and lovingkindness, God's deliverance of nations, The covenant faithfulness of god, Covenants, The covenant of redemption, Covenant theology and the ordinance of covenanting, An introduction to covenanted reformation, Background and history of the covenanted reformation of scotland, The national covenant, The solemn league and covenant, The covenanted reformation of scotland author/title listing, Covenanting in america, The scottish covenanting struggle, alexander craighead, and the mecklenburg declaration, Acts of faithful assemblies, Biography of covenanters, Selection of covenant heads for positions of leadership, The utter failure of the u.s. constitution as a social deed of covenant, Corporate faithfulness and sanctification, Confession of national sin and covenant renewal, Oaths, ensnaring (vows, promises, covenants) and bonds with the ungodly, and so forth, and so on.

Related WebLinks

Relation Between Church and State, William Cunningham
http://www.westminsterconfession.org/a-godly-society/relation-between-church-and-state.php

Calvin's Commentary on Hosea
http://www.iclnet.org/pub/resources/text/m.sion/calvhose.htm

Excerpts From Church and State in the United States by Philip Schaff, 1888
http://www.geocities.com/CapitolHill/7947/ChurchState.html

American Revisions to the Westminster Confession of Faith (1789)
http://www.opc.org/documents/WCF_orig.html
Appendix A: Major Changes of the Savoy Declaration
http://www.bible-researcher.com/wescoappa.html
Appendix B: Major Changes of the PCUSA (1788-1958)
http://www.bible-researcher.com/wescoappb.html
Appendix C: Major Changes of the UPCUSA and PCUS (1958-1983)
http://www.bible-researcher.com/wescoappc.html

The Scottish Covenanting Struggle, Alexander Craighead, and the Mecklenburg Declaration
http://www.lettermen2.com/craig.html#scsacmd

Political Polytheism, Part 4, a sermon by Brian Schwertley
http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?SID=1160518292

The Christian and Politics #04: Enemies of our Christian Heritage #1
Dr. C. Gregg Singer, The Christian and Politics
http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?SID=12705182945

Brief View of the Evidence for the Exercise of Civil Authority About Religion, Thomas M'Crie
http://www.westminsterconfession.org/a-godly-society/the-exercise-of-civil-authority-about-religion.php

Willson, James McLeod (1809-1866), An Essay on Submission to the Powers That Be
http://www.covenanter.org/reformed/2016/6/2/an-essay-on-submission-to-the-powers-that-be

*Matthews, Steven T., The Fed, Fiat Currency, and Feckless Keynesian Economics
The creation of the Fed [The Federal Reserve -- compiler], is "the most tragic blunder ever committed by Congress. The day it [the Federal Reserve Act of 1913] was passed, old America died and a new era began. A new institution was born that was to cause, or greatly contribute to, the unprecedented economic instability in the decades to come." -- Hans F. Sennholz in Money and Freedom, quoted in End the Fed, p. 23
The Fed, Fiat Currency, and Feckless Keynesian Economics, Steven T. Matthews
http://www.trinityfoundation.org/journal.php?id=316

The Historicism Research Foundation
http://www.historicism.net

Treason the New World Order
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ISBN%3D0945946147/minnesotaminutemA/102-7479358-0428823



A Theological Interpretation of American History

See the Theological Notes, "God Reigns: Divine Sovereignty," at Daniel 4:34 in The Reformation Study Bible.

Through faith we understand that the worlds were framed by the word of God, so that things which are seen were not made of things which do appear. (Hebrews 11:3)
"Ideas have consequences."

Of course, the influence of theology on corporate bodies has its counterpart in influence of theology on the lives of individuals. For example, see Howie's appendix titled 'The Judgment and Justice of God' (which chronicles God's judgments upon Reformation apostates and those who persecuted the Covenanters), in Howie, John, THE SCOTS WORTHIES. BIOGRAPHIA SCOTICANA: OR, A BRIEF HISTORICAL ACCOUNT OF THE LIVES, CHARACTERS, AND MEMORABLE TRANSACTIONS OF THE MOST EMINENT SCOTS WORTHIES, 2ND EDITION, CORRECTED AND ENLARGED, 1781, listed below.

Woodrow Wilson is one of the foremost examples of the grave consequences to society of ignoring the doctrines of the Sovereignty of God and of the Total Depravity of Man. See:
"Declaring Wilson to be 'the worst president in American history,' Powell makes a strong case that the rise of the Soviet Union and Nazi Germany were unintended consequences of Wilson's arrogance." -- Paul Craig Roberts in Call Me Unaccountable: Woodrow Wilson and George Bush.
Wilson was the son of a Princeton trained Presbyterian Pastor and a scholar who became President of Princeton, and later President of the United States. His Presidency was one of the worst in American history, and marked the beginning of a tragic national liberal downspin. It is a political example of the destructive consequence to individuals and nations of liberal theology gone awry -- the abandonment of sound doctrine and Christian magistracy.
"Wilson was born to religious and well-educated people, mainly of Scottish background. Wilson's father, Joseph Ruggles Wilson, studied for the clergy at the Presbyterian directed Princeton University. He married Janet Woodrow, and early in the 1850s the Wilsons moved to Virginia, where he became minister of a church in Staunton. There, in 1856 Thomas Woodrow Wilson was born, the first son and third child. . . .
"Wilson was the only professional academic to become president. He began his career teaching history and political science at Bryn Mawr College in 1885 and moved to Wesleyan University in Connecticut in 1888. Two years later he went to Princeton, where he quickly became the most popular and highest-paid faculty member. In 1902 he was the unanimous choice to become president of Princeton." -- Miland Brown in Woodrow Wilson: A Brief Biography
"When formal theological seminaries were organized, one of the first was the Theological Seminary of the Presbyterian Church at Princeton, New Jersey, where instruction began in 1812 [Rules and Precepts That are Observed in the College at Cambridge in Massachusetts Bay, September 26, 1642 (now known as Harvard University), show the centrality of Christ at the oldest college in America. The Regulations at Yale College (1745) show the centrality of Calvinism and the Westminster Confession (1646), in Colonial higher education. -- compiler]. Founded by the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America, the seminary held to the Westminster Confession of Faith and Catechisms as its doctrinal standards.
"Princeton excelled under the leadership of distinguished teachers who devoted themselves vigorously and effectively to the development, propagation, and maintenance of the Reformed faith. Among those best known as teachers of the great scriptural system of theology set forth by Princeton's first professor Archibald Alexander were Charles Hodge, J.A. Alexander, B.B. Warfield, and J. Gresham Machen.
"But eventually a movement surfaced to end Princeton's adherence to scriptural theology, and in 1929 Princeton Theological Seminary was reorganized under modernist influences.
"Among the Princeton faculty who loved the Reformed faith were Robert Dick Wilson, J. Gresham Machen, Oswald T. Allis, and Cornelius Van Til. Almost immediately after Princeton's reorganization, these four men founded Westminster Theological Seminary in Philadelphia, and, with others who were invited to join the teaching staff, continued the exposition and defense of the Reformed faith." -- "History" at Westminster Theological Seminary website
"[Woodrow] Wilson had been engaged for several years to Ellen Louise Axson, and they were married in June 1885. Proficient and lively, Ellen proved the perfect mate for her husband. She gave him unqualified support and helped free his mind from everyday pressures. The couple had three daughters . . . [see below -- compiler]
"In June 1916 the Democrats renominated Wilson. Their platform emphasized peace, and argued that Wilson had kept the United States out of the war. The Republicans nominated Charles Evans Hughes, a former governor of New York with an honored record of reform, and an associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. On election night Hughes appeared to have had won, but as the returns came in from California in the early morning hours, the race went to Wilson, who won the state by a mere 1983 votes." [Sound similar to Election 2000? Perhaps a recount would have changed Election 1916. -- compiler] "The Lucitania was sunk. Wilson then broke his campaign promise to keep the United States out of the war. Americans were not impassioned enough to enlist in the military, and Wilson instituted compulsory conscription." -- Miland Brown in Woodrow Wilson: A Brief Biography
Woodrow Wilson's first child, Margaret Woodrow Wilson (1886-1944), was devoted to social causes and "studied the religious classics of India extensively." She became fascinated by the writing of Sri Aurobindo during a visit to the New York City Library. (Mira Richards, The Mother on Aurobindo). "She eventually traveled to Pondicherry, India, [in 1941], where she lived in the ashram of Sri Aurobindo, a contemporary of Gandhi." There she was a personal assistant to Aurobindo and The Mother and typed Aurobindo's manuscripts for the IDEAL OF HUMAN UNITY. (Mira Richards, The Mother on Aurobindo), "Never married, she died of uremia on April 24, 1944 [about three years after first arriving -- compiler], and is buried in the Protestant cemetery at the ashram in Pondicherry."
Margaret was 33 when the League of Nations was formed in 1919, so the philosophy of Sri Aurobindo could have been influential in the founding of the League of Nations. "The League of Nations ceased its activities after failing to prevent the Second World War."
The United Nations Conference on International Organization met in San Francisco in 1945 to draw up the United Nations Charter. Because Margaret was devoted to social causes, and because she was the daughter of Woodrow Wilson, who was President during the formation of the League of Nations in 1919 (she was then 33), it could be expected that the philosophy of Sri Aurobindo as expressed in THE IDEAL OF HUMAN UNITY (which Margaret typed for Sri Aurobindo as his personal assistant between 1941-1944), and which was published under the same cover with Aurobindo's WAR AND SELF DETERMINATION, may also have been influential in the formation of the United Nations.
See also:
Timeline of the liberalization of the Presbyterian Church in Crossed Fingers by Gary North
http://entrewave.com/freebooks/docs/html/gncf/timeline.htm
The Non-duality of Sri Aurobindo and The Mother: A Profile
http://www.lettermen2.com/syncret.html

The following timeline shows how growing liberalism within the Presbyterian church paralleled growing liberalism in the political sphere of American society. It also shows the place of President Woodrow Wilson in it all.
1758 The reunion of the Old Side and the New Side of American Presbyterian Church. "This signaled the end of the influence of Calvinism in American Politics."
1787 There were two conventions in Philadelphia: the Constitution Convention and a convention of the Presbyterian Church.
1788 "In 1787-88, American Presbyterians revised the Westminster Confession of Faith (1646) in order to make it conform to the political pluralism that also lay behind the U.S. Constitution, which was being ratified at the same time that the presbyteries were voting for the revision of the Confession. The Presbyterians removed that clause in Chapter XXIII:3 which had authorized the civil magistrate to call a synod for advice [The resulting confession is known as "The American Version." Changes were also made to 20-4, 22-3, 23-3,24-4, 25-6 and 31.2. The American Version is found in A Guide to the Westminster Standards: Confession of Faith and Larger Catechism, with the text of the original Westminster Confession of Faith (1646) printed in italics for comparison. These and future revisions removed Christian Magistracy from the Confession (WCF 1646), and essentially emasculated Christianity and set aside Christ's Crown and Covenant. Conveniently this removed churchmen and laymen from the battlefront of standing for Christ's Crown and Covenant. From then on American Presbyterians could "have their cake and eat it too." What has followed has been a precipitous decline in American society. Covenanters prescribe to the original Confession of 1646 that upholds Christ's Crown and Covenant. See to topical listing The Westminster Confession of Faith (1646), (The Westminster Standards), and Related Works: A Study Guide which is a Covenanter document. -- compiler]. This was one of the last traces of the theocratic Calvinism of the Scottish Covenanters -- or Calvin's theocratic Calvinism, for that matter." -- Gary North
1788 Ratification: U.S. Constitution, revised Westminster Confession. For a detailed discussion see "Authority: Biblical, Confessional, Ecclesiastical," in CROSSED FINGERS: HOW THE LIBERALS CAPTURED THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH.
1812 The Theological Seminary of the Presbyterian Church at Princeton, New Jersey, began instruction. "Founded by the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America, the seminary held to the Westminster Confession of Faith and Catechisms as its doctrinal standards." (Probably the "American Version" of 1789. -- compiler)
1856 Thomas Woodrow Wilson was born in Staunton, Virginia, the son of a Presbyterian preacher educated at Princeton.
1885 Woodrow Wilson married Ellen Louise Axson.
1886 Margaret Woodrow Wilson was born. She was devoted to social causes and "studied the religious classics of India extensively." She became fascinated by the writing of Sri Aurobindo during a visit to the New York City Library. (Mira Richards, The Mother on Aurobindo) "She eventually traveled to Pondicherry, India, [in 1941] where she lived in the ashram of Sri Aurobindo, a contemporary of Gandhi." There she was a personal assistant to Aurobindo and The Mother and typed Aurobindo's manuscripts for the IDEAL OF HUMAN UNITY (Mira Richards, The Mother on Aurobindo) "Never married, she died of uremia on April 24, 1944 [about three years after first arriving -- compiler], and is buried in the Protestant cemetery at the ashram in Pondicherry."
1890 Wilson went to Princeton, where he quickly became the most popular and highest-paid faculty member.
1902 Wilson "was the unanimous choice to become president of Princeton" University. Margaret Wilson would have been six years old.
1903 Westminster Confession revised again (universal love of God)
1903 Establishment of the Committee on Church Cooperation. "(The final trace was the Confession's assertion that the failure to take an oath to a lawful authority is a sin [XXII:3]. That provision was abandoned in the 1903 revision, and Machen's Orthodox Presbyterian Church did not restore it in 1936). From that time on, Presbyterians became defenders of a secularized republican order. They believed that God's civil covenant could be made on a common-ground confessional basis, without a mandatory covenantal civil oath, operating under a providential natural law order that did not mandate Trinitarian confession. . . . From that time on, Presbyterians became defenders of a secularized republican order." -- Gary North
1906 J. Gresham Machen joins Princeton's faculty.
1908 Federal Council of Churches (FCC) begins, led by Roberts.
1908 Presbyterian Church reorganized.
1913 The presidency and administration of Woodrow Wilson begins (1913-1921). Margaret Wilson would have been 27 years old. See The Non-duality of Sri Aurobindo and The Mother: A Profile.
1913 Ratification of the Sixteenth Amendment authorizes income tax.
1913 The Federal Reserve System was passed into law.
1914 Wilson's first wife dies in August. World War I breaks out in August. Wilson remarried in December to Edith who was like his first wife.
1916 The National Women's Party is founded. Margaret Wilson 30 years old.
1916 "In June 1916 the Democrats renominated Wilson. Their platform emphasized peace, and argued that Wilson had kept the United States out of the war. The Republicans nominated Charles Evans Hughes, a former governor of New York with an honored record of reform, and an associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. On election night Hughes appeared to have had won, but as the returns came in from California in the early morning hours, the race went to Wilson, who won the state by a mere 1983 votes." [Sound similar to Election 2000? Perhaps a recount would have changed Election 1916. -- compiler] "The Lucitania was sunk. Wilson then broke his campaign promise to keep the United States out of the war. Americans were not impassioned enough to enlist in the military, and Wilson instituted compulsory conscription." -- Miland Brown in Woodrow Wilson: A Brief Biography For more on the long term impact of Wilson's foreign policy on American history see WILSON'S WAR: HOW WOODROW WILSON'S GREAT BLUNDER LED TO HITLER, LENIN, STALIN, AND WORLD WAR II and THEODORE AND WOODROW: HOW TWO AMERICAN PRESIDENTS DESTROYED CONSTITUTIONAL FREEDOM. For a discussion of the impact of Woodrow Wilson's daughter, Margaret, on international politics see "The Non-duality of Sri Aurobindo and The Mother: A Profile." -- compiler].
1917 United States joins Allies in European fighting of World War I; Bolsheviks led by Lenin seize power in Russia.
1917 Women picket the White House for the right to vote. Margaret was 31.
1917 Compulsory conscription enacted.
1918 Armistice ends World War I.
1918 A striking worldwide social decline begins as follows.
1918 The worldwide Swine Flue pandemic took the lives of an estimated 500,000 individuals before it subsided in 1919.
1919 After President Woodrow Wilson calls a special session of Congress to consider the proposed women's suffrage amendment, the House of Representatives passes it on May 21 and the Senate passes it on June 4.
1919 The National American Woman Suffrage Association holds its convention in St. Louis, where Carrie Chapman Catt rallies to transform the association into the League of Women Voters.
1919 In January, the National Women's Party lights and guards a "Watchfire for Freedom." It is maintained until the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution passes the U.S. Senate on June 4.
1919 The League of Nations is founded [under the Treaty of Versailles "to promote international cooperation and to achieve peace and security." -- compiler]; Margaret Wilson was 33 when the League of Nations was formed in 1919, so the philosophy of Sri Aurobindo could have been influential in its founding. "The League of Nations ceased its activities in 1946 after failing to prevent the Second World War."
1919 The Communist Party of America is founded.
1919 Benito Mussolini introduces fascism in Italy; the first public birth control clinic is opened in Brooklyn, New York; Margaret Sanger is arrested for operating a birth control clinic. Margaret Wilson is 33.
1919 Wilson had a near break down in September. In October he suffered a massive stroke.
1920 The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) founded by Roger Baldwin, Crystal Eastman, Albert DeSilver, and others, some of whom were avowed Communists.
1920 Women win the right to vote with ratification of the Nineteen Amendment/
1920 The League of Women Voters is founded. Margaret Wilson 34 years old.
1921 Wilson leaves the White House a broken man. Warren G. Harding became President.
1921 Margaret Sanger establishes the American Birth Control League, the predecessor of Planned Parenthood. Margaret Wilson 35 years old.
1922 Union of Soviet Socialist Republics is established; Mussolini is named prime minister of Italy.
1922 Mussolini is named prime minister of Italy.
1923 Machen's CHRISTIANITY AND LIBERALISM, was published. The Pew Charitable Trust sent a copy to every pastor in America.
1923 Adolf Hitler forms National Socialist Party in Germany.
1924 Woodrow Wilson died.
1924 About 1300 ministers of the United Presbyterian Church in the United States of America "signed and circulated the Auburn Affirmation, a document that denied the infallibility of Scripture and asserted that the Virgin Birth, the miracles of Christ, his Atonement, and Resurrection were unessential." Margaret Wilson 38 years old.
1924 The first U.S. gay rights organization, the Society for Human Rights, is founded in Chicago; Joseph Stalin succeeds Lenin as leader of Soviet Union; new Chinese government is formed with communist members.
1925 John T. Scopes is convicted of teaching the theory of evolution; Tennessee bans the teaching of evolution.
1929 Princeton Theological Seminary was reorganized under modernist influences.
1929 "Almost immediately after Princeton's reorganization, these four men [Robert Dick Wilson, J. Gresham Machen, Oswald T. Allis, and Cornelius Van Til -- compiler], founded Westminster Theological Seminary in Philadelphia, and, with others who were invited to join the teaching staff [among them J. Gresham Machen, Charles Hodge, Archibald Alexander, and B.B. Warfield -- compiler], continued the exposition and defense of the Reformed faith." -- Westminster Theological Seminary
1929 The stock market crashes, beginning the Great Depression.
1933 President Franklin Roosevelt closes all U.S. banks.
1933 New Deal legislation is passed including the establishment of the National Recovery Administration and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA).
1933 The Twenty-first Amendment, ending Prohibition, is passed.
1933 Frances Perkins becomes the first woman appointed to the U.S. Cabinet. She serves as Secretary of Labor until 1945.
1935 President Roosevelt signs the Social Security Act.
1936 "The signers of the Auburn Affirmation showed that they had captured the church by reorganizing Princeton Seminary and placing one of the signers on its governing board, by electing one of their number Moderator of the General Assembly and, what was decisive, by excommunicating those ministers who had insisted on maintaining the Westminster Standards in practice. Thus ministers who rejected the Scripture and all it contains were given authority, while men who believed the Bible and all it contains were ejected as disturbers of the peace. Since that day the Westminster Confession has been a dead letter in that denomination. . . ." -- Gordon H. Clark
1941 Margaret Wilson, at age 55, "traveled to Pondicherry, India, where she lived in the ashram of Sri Aurobindo, a contemporary of Gandhi." There she was a personal assistant to Aurobindo and The Mother (see "The Non-duality of Sri Aurobindo and The Mother: A Profile." -- compiler), and she typed Aurobindo's manuscripts for the IDEAL OF HUMAN UNITY. (Mira Richards, The Mother on Aurobindo)
1941 The Japanese attack Pearl Harbor on December 7, bringing the United States into World War II. It appears to have been the biggest conspiracy in American history. See also: DAY OF DECEIT: THE TRUTH ABOUT FDR AND PEARL HARBOR.
1941 Jeanette Rankin, a Republican and a pacifist, is the only member of Congress to vote against declaring war on Japan following the attack on Peal Harbor.
1942 The United States enters World War II.
1942 The Manhattan Project begins developing the atomic bomb.
1943 The Women's Army Corps (WAC), becomes a branch of the U.S. Armed Forces on July 1. Its director is Oveta Culp Hobby.
1944 Wilson's, oldest child, Margaret Woodrow Wilson died at age 58. She "never married, she died of uremia on April 24, 1944 [about three years after first arriving -- compiler], and is buried in the Protestant cemetery at the ashram in Pondicherry." See The Non-duality of Sri Aurobindo and The Mother: A Profile.
1945 Roosevelt dies. Truman becomes President. The first atomic bomb is exploded at Alamogordo, New Mexico.
1945 The United States drops atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki.
1945 Representatives of 50 countries met in San Francisco at the United Nations Conference on International Organization to draw up the United Nations Charter. Because Margaret Wilson was devoted to social causes, and because she was the daughter of Woodrow Wilson, who was President during the formation of the League of Nations in 1919 (she was then 33), it could be expected that the philosophy of Sri Aurobindo as expressed in THE IDEAL OF HUMAN UNITY (which Margaret typed for Sri Aurobindo as his personal assistant between 1941-1944. See "1941"), and which was published under the same cover with Aurobindo's WAR AND SELF DETERMINATION, may also have been influential in the formation of the United Nations.
1945 The United Nations Charter is adopted.
1946 The Atomic Energy Commission is formed.
1946 The League of Nations is replaced by the United Nations.
Late 50s An occult revival of non-dualistic, eastern religion began in the United States. Guru's began coming to the United States from India and the Far East.
1962 The Supreme Court bars school prayer.
1963 The Supreme Court bars mandatory Bible reading in public schools.
1963 The United States enters the Vietnamese Conflict.
1963 The report of the Presidential Commission on the Status of Women finds discrimination against women in every aspect of American life and outlines plans to achieve equality. Specific recommendations for women in the workplace included fair hiring practices, paid maternity leave, and affordable childcare.
1965 The Supreme Court holds that the "right of privacy" covers the use of contraceptives.
1969 The Stonewall rebellion, at a bar in New York City, starts the modern gay rights movement.
1971 The Twenty-sixth Amendment is ratified, lowering the national voting age from 21 to 18.
1972 The Supreme Court rules the death penalty unconstitutional. This ruling was later reversed in 1976.
1973 In the Roe v. Wade decision the Supreme Court rules that a state may not prevent a woman from having an abortion during the first six months of pregnancy.
1982 The Supreme Court bars posting of the Ten Commandments in schools.
1987 Robert Bork is nominated by President Reagan to the Supreme Court, but withdraws in the face of strong opposition.
1993 William Clinton was elected President. Poles show majority of Americans are pro-abortion.
1993 Janet Reno sworn in as the first female Attorney General; cult leader David Koresh and many followers die in a Texas compound fire.
1993 President Clinton touches off controversy with his attempt to end the ban on homosexuals in the military.
1993 Suspect arrested in bombing that killed six at the World Trade Center in New York City;
1994 The John Birch Society experienced a "tidal wave of growth, recruiting averaged 79 percent higher than in 1993, literature sales in 1994 were double that of two years earlier, and subscriptions to The New American doubled in 25 months."
1994 The Gender Equity in Education Act becomes law in the U.S. It bans sex-role stereotyping and gender discrimination in the classroom.
1994 The Violence Against Women Act becomes law.
1994 National Organization for Women v. Scheidler, 510 U.S. 249 (1994), is a United States Supreme Court case in which the Court ruled that the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (RICO) could apply to enterprises without economic motives; pro-life protesters could thus be prosecuted under it. An organization without an economic motive can still affect interstate or foreign commerce and thus satisfy the Act's definition of a racketeering enterprise.
1995 Appeals court upholds woman's plea to enter Citadel military academy.
1995 The Sligo Seventh-day Adventist Church in Takoma Park, Maryland, ordained three women in violation of the denomination's rules -- Kendra Haloviak, Norma Osborn, and Penny Shell.
1996 President Clinton blocks ban on late-term abortions.
1996 Clinton appoints Madeleine Albright as first female U.S. Secretary of State.
1997 President William Clinton is re-elected for a second term; Reproductive rights and gun control are campaign issues; repeated attempt to outlaw partial-birth abortion failed in Congress during the Clinton administrations.
2000 Approximately 35 million American children have been killed in the womb since Roe v. Wade in 1973; approximately 35 million aliens have entered the United States since 1973.
2001 George W. Bush elected President. Poles show that the majority of Americans are anti-abortion. Americans are still unable to overturn Roe v. Wade apparently due to liberal Supreme Court Justices, appointed by liberal Presidents, elected by a liberal electorate, comprised of 50 percent women voters.
Abortion was the 20th Century's biggest single killer of mankind worldwide, far surpassing any other cause: disease, war, governments, natural disasters, and so forth. See Biggest Killers of the 20th Century. Notice that abortion is not included in this diagram. The absence of information says something about the depravity of mankind (Jeremiah 17:9,10), and about the suppression and repression of truth. (Hosea 4:6,7)
The total abortions worldwide for the 20th Century may be interpolation from available data. The calculation does not factor in incremental increases in world population since 1900. Worldwide there are an estimated 43.8 million abortions annually (2008 figures, Guttmacher Institute) X 100 years = 4.38 billion killings worldwide in the 20th Century. This is compared to 1.97 billion estimated deaths worldwide for non-communicable diseases the reported biggest killer worldwide of the 20th Century. Comparison may also be made with figures for genocide.
2005 Approximately 43 million American children have been killed in the womb of their mothers since Roe v. Wade in 1973; [56 million American babies from 1973 to 2014, annual rate continues at 1.2 million babies a year. -- compiler]
"Immigrants in the United States and their U.S.-born children now number approximately 81 million people, or 26 percent of the overall U.S. population." -- Historical Numbers and Shares
"The U.S. immigrant population stood at more than 42.4 million, or 13.3 percent, of the total U.S. population of 318.9 million in 2014, according to ACS data. Between 2013 and 2014, the foreign-born population increased by 1 million, or 2.5 percent." -- 5 Facts About Illegal Immigration in the U.S.
2008 Barack Obama becomes the first African-American to be elected President, with 52.8 percent of the vote. Political analysts state he would not have been elected if it had not been for the women's vote.
See also:
The Westminster Confession (completed by the Assembly in 1646, Approved by Parliament in 1647), The Westminster Standards and Related Works, The Westminster Assembly
Refer to the comments on alterations to The Westminster Confession of Faith in the beginning notes.
http://www.lettermen2.com/bcrr9chc.html#wstandards
Male Role and Responsibility, Gender Equality, Suffrage, Reproductive Rights, and the Decline of American Society
http://www.lettermen2.com/bcrr9chc.html#suffrage.
Heresies Defined and the Necessity of Heresies Explained, by George Gillespie, Scottish Commissioner to the Assembly of Divines at Westminster
http://www.truecovenanter.com/gillespie/ggilles09.html
Unfaithful Reformed Ministries
http://www.lettermen2.com/bcrrappd.html#unfaith

*Baxter, Richard (1615-1691), William Lamont (editor), A Holy Commonwealth, ISBN: 0521405807.
"A HOLY COMMONWEALTH is Richard Baxter's invisible masterpiece." -- William Lamont
Contains 380 theses on government with commentary when available.
"Written in 1659 by the Puritan minister (1615-1691), who publicly repudiated the work in 1670, this modern edition of a controversial text represents a candid confession as to why a conservative Puritan fought for Parliament in the Civil War and gave his support to the Cromwells." -- Publisher
Contains 380 theses on government with commentary when available. These 380 aphorisms are valuable casuistry in support of Christian magistracy.
Baxter's repudiation of the work is also included. It is interesting to note that he never repudiated the first part of the book, which lays the foundation for Christian Magistracy. It was only the second part that was repudiated by, as Lamont says, his public persona which was Arminian.
Apparently, in Richard Baxter we have an example of the Armenian being unable to stand publicly for Covenanted Reformation, yet his private persona wrote A HOLY COMMONWEALTH, and his unpublished papers show that he continued to recommend the work to associates after his public repudiation.
A Holy Commonwealth: or, Political Aphorisms, Opening the True Principles of Government: For the Healing of the Mistakes, and Resolving the Doubts, That Most Endanger England at This Time (1659)
http://archive.org/details/holywealth00baxt

Calvin, John (1509-1564), Calvin's Commentary on Hosea
http://www.iclnet.org/pub/resources/text/m.sion/calvhose.htm

Calvin, John (1509-1564), Calvin's Commentary on Zechariah and Malachi
http://www.ccel.org/ccel/calvin/calcom30.html

*Calvin, John (1509-1564), The Necessity of Reforming the Church (1544). Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Also found in CALVIN'S SELECTED WORKS, TRACTS AND LETTERS. Available in Library of Presbyterian Heritage Publications and Protestant Heritage Press CD-ROM Library. Available in THE CHURCH EFFEMINATE AND OTHER ESSAYS.
"It [NECESSITY OF REFORMING THE CHURCH (1544) -- compiler], has still been correctly acknowledged as one of the most important documents of the Reformation."
"C.H. Spurgeon once said, 'the longer I live the clearer does it appear that John Calvin's system is the nearest to perfection.' (cited in Christian History, Vol. 5, No. 4). . . . Like Calvin, some few believers today see 'the present condition of the Church . . . to be very miserable, and almost desperate.' Our context is different in one key respect however. The church needing reformation in Calvin's day was the tradition-encrusted church of Rome. Shortly after the Reformation, for those leaving Rome behind, two streams became apparent. One was the stream of classical Protestant orthodoxy, represented today by a handful of Gideons in their desktop publishing wine vats. The other was the left wing of the Reformation -- the anabaptist movement. In the early years, the anabaptists were suffering outsiders. But today the anabaptist church is the Establishment -- an establishment governed by a chaos of traditions instead of biblical worship. Everywhere we look we see Christians approaching God with observances in worship which Calvin calls 'the random offspring of their own brain.' Though this work is not an elaborate systematic presentation of the foundations of Christianity, such as CALVIN'S INSTITUTES, it has still been correctly acknowledged as one of the most important documents of the Reformation. Calvin here pleads the cause dearest to his heart before an assembly perhaps the most august that Europe could have furnished in that day. It has been said that the animated style used by Calvin in this work would not lose by comparison with any thing in the celebrated 'Dedication' prefixed to his INSTITUTES. To this day, THE NECESSITY OF REFORMING THE CHURCH remains a powerful weapon, both defensive and offensive, to fight the contemporary battle for Protestantism -- the everlasting gospel of truth. Here, in our modern setting, we find the answers to many of the vexing questions which continue to agitate the Church." -- Publisher
The Necessity of Reforming the Church (1543), by John Calvin
http://www.swrb.com/newslett/actualnls/NRC_ch00.htm

Clark, Gordon H. (1902-1985), John W. Robbins (1949-2008, editor), Historiography: Secular and Religious, ISBN: 0940931397 9780940931398 (Unicoi, TN: The Trinity Foundation, 1994).
"The Christian doctrine of the sovereignty of God transformed the world's view of history, investing it with a meaning, importance, and grandeur that pagan historiography could never achieve. History is the unfolding of God's purpose and plan. Because God is rational, because God is sovereign, history is not a tale told by an idiot.
"The Bible is not only the earliest history book, it is also the most reliable. Centuries before the famed historians of Greece and Rome, Moses had already written the definitive account of mankind's early history as revealed to him by God. The account was not exhaustive, for no history can be, but it contained all that God wished it to contain and nothing else. God, writing through Moses, has given us true history.
"HISTORIOGRAPHY SECULAR AND RELIGIOUS will introduce the reader to the principles and problems of historiography and, in so doing, begin to suggest what an enormous debt we owe to the Bible in the study of history." -- Publisher
*Robbins, John W. (1949-2008, editor), Christ and Civilization, ISBN: 1891777246 9781891777240.
"A new 48-page booklet. Includes a complete listing (in an additional 16 pages), of the books currently available from The Trinity Foundation."
Christ and Civilization
http://www.trinityfoundation.org/PDF/200a-ChristandCivilization.pdf

*Howie, John (1735-1793), The Scots Worthies. Biographia Scoticana: or, A Brief Historical Account of the Lives, Characters, and Memorable Transactions of the Most Eminent Scots Worthies . . . as also, an Appendix, containing a short historical hint of the wicked lives . . . of the . . . apostates and . . . persecutors in Scotland . . . 2nd edition, corrected and enlarged, 1781. A Christian classic. Available (PDF and MP3 audio book files) on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available (PDF file) on Reformation Bookshelf CD #1, #10. The series of 22 MP3 audio book files, produced by Still Waters Revival Books, are available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #1-30 and at AudioSermons.com.
"Most commonly known as SCOTS WORTHIES, this edition contains Howie's footnotes (defending the Covenanters), and Howie's appendix titled 'The Judgment and Justice of God' (which chronicles God's judgments upon Reformation apostates and those who persecuted the Covenanters). It is the only edition in print which contains both these sections intended for publication by the author (as later editors often removed either one or both of these parts of this book). BIOGRAPHIA SCOTICANA covers the history of 'noblemen, gentlemen, ministers and others from Mr. Patrick Hamilton, who was born about the year of our Lord 1503, and suffered martyrdom at St. Andrews, Feb., 1527, to Mr. James Renwick, who was executed in the Grass-market of Edinburgh, Feb. 17, 1688. Together with a succinct account of the lives of other seven eminent divines, and Sir Robert Hamilton of Preston, who died about, or shortly after the Revolution.' This is one of our best history books (over 700 pages), covering all of the major Scottish Reformers. Howie summarizes his book as follows: 'The design of the following was to collect, from the best authorities, a summary account of the lives, characters, and contendings, of a certain number of our most renowned SCOTS WORTHIES, who, for their faithful services, ardent zeal, constancy in sufferings, and other Christian graces and virtues, deserve honourable memorial in the Church of Christ; and for which their names have been, and will be savoury to all the true lovers of our Zion, while Reformation principles are regarded.' Furthermore, the momentous nature of the struggles chronicled in this book are succinctly noted when Howie writes: 'the primitive witnesses had the divinity of the Son of God, and an open confession of Him, for their testimony. Our reformers from Popery had Antichrist to struggle with, in asserting the doctrines of the Gospel, and the right way of salvation in and through Jesus Christ. Again, in the reigns of James VI. and Charles I., Christ's REGALIA, and the divine right of Presbytery, became the subject matter of their testimony. Then, in the beginning of the reign of Charles II. (until he got the whole of our ancient and laudable constitution effaced and overturned), our Worthies only saw it their duty to hold and contend for what they had already attained unto. But, in the end of this and the subsequent tyrant's reign, they found it their duty (a duty which they had too long neglected), to advance one step higher, by casting off their authority altogether, and that as well on account of their manifest usurpation of Christ's crown and dignity, as on account of their treachery, bloodshed, and tyranny . . . which may be summed up. The Primitive martyrs sealed the prophetic office of Christ in opposition to Pagan idolatry. The reforming martyrs sealed His priestly office with their blood, in opposition to Popish idolatry. And last of all, our late martyrs have sealed His kingly office with their best blood, in despite of supremacy and bold Erastianism. They indeed have cemented it upon His royal head, so that to the world's end it shall never drop off again.' Moreover, the importance of this book can be clearly seen when Johnston, in TREASURY OF THE SCOTTISH COVENANT, reports that, Walter Scott refers to Howie as 'the fine old chronicler of the Cameronians'. . . Howie's book has been for upwards of a century a household word, occupying a place on the shelf beside THE BIBLE and THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS.' Written for God, country and the covenanted work of Reformation. Stirring history!" -- Publisher
Biographia Scoticana, John Howie
Original from Oxford University, published 1885, digitized May 22, 2006. Described as a reprint of the 1781 edition. It does not appear to include the appendix cited above.
http://books.google.com/books?vid=OCLC34190563&id=5iwAAAAAQAAJ&q=Scots+Worthies+1781&dq=Scots+Worthies+1781&ie=ISO-8859-1&pgis=1
See also: A CLOUD OF WITNESSES FOR THE ROYAL PREROGATIVES OF JESUS CHRIST BEING THE LAST SPEECHES AND TESTIMONIES OF THOSE WHO HAVE SUFFERED FOR THE TRUTH IN SCOTLAND SINCE . . . 1680 and JOHN FOXE'S BOOK OF MARTYRS. ACTES AND MONUMENTS OF MATTERS MOST SPECIALL AND MEMORABLE. Available from: http://www.johnfoxe.org. Implemented by the Humanities Research Institute, University of Sheffield, England, and published by HRI Online Publications, Sheffield, 2011, Version 2.0, ISBN: 9780954260864.

*Kerr, James (1847-1905), Church and State: Three Lectures. I. Religious Equality -- National Disaster. II. Erastian Establishment -- Ecclesiastical Dishonour. III. Scriptural Establishment -- Imperial Glory. Available in pamphlet format from:
Covenanter Pamphlets
http://www.covenanter.org/pamphlets/
Church and State: Three Lectures. I. Religious Equality -- National Disaster. II. Erastian Establishment -- Ecclesiastical Dishonour. III. Scriptural Establishment -- Imperial Glory
http://www.covenanter.org/reformed/2015/8/7/james-kerrs-three-lectures-on-church-and-state

Potter, William, Providential Battles: Twenty Battles That Changed the World, audio CD, ISBN: 193343130X.
"In this four-part album, "Providential Battles," Christian historian William Potter provides a providential interpretation of twenty of the greatest military battles in the world, which altered the course of history, serving strategic roles in God's unfolding plan. Including battles from ancient history, to the fall of Constantinople to the Turks, to the American War for Independence, to the Alamo and Civil War events, Mr. Potter presents a panorama of providential military highlights. This album concludes with the mysteries of providence that engulfed the Axis powers of WWII in the air, on land, and at sea. 257 minutes on 4 CDs." -- Publisher

Powell, Jim, Wilson's War: How Woodrow Wilson's Great Blunder led to Hitler, Lenin, Stalin, and World War II, ISBN: 1400082366 9781400082360.

*Price, Greg L., Biblical Civil Government Versus the Beast; and, the Basis for Civil Resistance. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #26.
"This is the best modern testimony for the biblical principles of civil magistracy -- which were so prominent during the height of the Second Reformation -- that we have seen. Price documents the teachings of many of the major Reformers (and some of the church fathers), and in an easy reading manner simplifies what can at times become a very complex subject. This particular Reformation message, proclaiming Christ's Kingship over the nations (and the practical outworking of the same), has been buried from the view of the general public for some time now, but is once again being brought to light in this very helpful introductory book. A sobering appendix has been added (written by a friend of the Covenanted Reformation), which shows why it is unlawful for a Christian to swear any oath to uphold and defend the U.S. Constitution. This appendix also compares the points of difference between classic (or historic), Reformed teaching and modern Reformed teaching regarding magistracy and religion. Special attention is given to the OPC, the PCA and the RPCNA and the changes that these groups have made to second Reformation confessional standards (concerning matters related to the civil magistrate). Statements by B.B. Warfield are also contrasted to the older Reformed views. You won't find a better easy-to-read and easy to understand introduction to this important topic -- a topic which impacts directly on every Christian's testimony for the crown rights of King Jesus!" -- Publisher
"It is this author's contention that the modern churches have let go of this important piece of the faith [Christ's Kingship over the nations -- compiler], once for all delivered to the saints. Thereby they have delivered the church, not to kings as nursing fathers, but to the cruel civil domination of the enemies of the true religion, their sheep being taught that they must submit passively to every pretended civil authority as the ordinance of God. By this defection, these leaders of the flock have also undermined the magistracy, allowing and even encouraging wicked men to remove this blessed ordinance from its foundation in God its creator, and from its subjection to Christ His King, thereby directly opposing God's benevolent ends in instituting civil government: 'Thus have [they] made the commandment of God of none effect by [their] tradition. . . . teaching for doctrines the commandments of men' (Matthew 15:6,9). Furthermore, by their false teaching regarding civil government, they have made themselves guilty of the very sin of which we are often accused: opposing the ordinance of God. If this wasn't enough, however, consider that their sin is worse than that of the garden variety rebel, inasmuch as their opposition to God's institution is not so much practical as it is principal; and because of their position as teachers and guides of the flock of God. 'Be not many masters, knowing that we shall receive the greater condemnation. . . . For we can do nothing against the truth, but for the truth.' (James 3:1; II Cor. 13:8 [2 Corinthians 13:8]) -- Greg Price, Biblical Civil Government Verses the Beast, p. 64
Biblical Civil Government Versus the Beast; and, the Basis for Civil Resistance, Greg Price
http://www.swrb.com/newslett/actualnls/BibCG_GP.htm

Reformed Presbyterian Church (Scotland), A Short Directory for Religious Societies, 1881. Originally published in 1772. Alternate title: RULES FOR FELLOWSHIP MEETINGS.
A Short Directory for Religious Societies
http://www.covenanter.org/reformed/2015/8/24/vuh52dogwp1ry74n5cnz4tu2jrbppz

*Reformed Presbytery in North America (Steelite), David Steele (1803-1887), John Thorburn (1730?-1788), John Courtass (d. 1795), et al., Act, Declaration, and Testimony, for the Whole of the Covenanted Reformation, as Attained to, and Established in, Britain and Ireland; Particularly Betwixt the Years 1638 and 1649, Inclusive. As, Also, Against all the Steps of Defection From Said Reformation, Whether in Former or Later Times, Since the Overthrow of that Glorious Work, Down to This Present day (1876), (Philadelphia, PA: Printed by Rue and Jones, 1876), a new edition of the Ploughlandhead Testimony of 1761, the subordinate standard of the original "Steelite" Reformed Presbytery that was constitutes in 1840. Available (the 1850 edition only) on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available (the 1850 edition only) on Reformation Bookshelf CD #1.
"And now, when time has proved that more recent Testimonies, Terms, and Covenants, have failed to preserve either unity or uniformity among those who framed them; it cannot be unseasonable to re-exhibit the original ACT, DECLARATION, AND TESTIMONY, which has been justly characterized as 'the most profoundly reasoned document ever emitted by the Reformed Presbyterian Church'." -- The Reformation Advocate Magazine, Vol. I, No. 8, December, 1875, page 267
"Upholds the original work of the Westminster Assembly and testifies to the abiding worth and truth formulated in the Westminster family of documents. Upholds and defends the Crown Rights of King Jesus in Church and State, denouncing those who would remove the crown from Christ's head by denying His right to rule (by His law), in both the civil and ecclesiastical spheres. Testifies to the received doctrine, government, worship, and discipline of the Church of Scotland in her purest (reforming) periods. Applies God's Word to the Church's corporate attainments 'with a judicial approbation of the earnest contendings and attainments of the faithful, and a strong and pointed judicial condemnation of error and the promoters thereof.' (The Contending Witness magazine, Dec. 17/93, p. 558). Shows the church's great historical victories (such as the National and Solemn League and Covenant, leading to the Westminster Assembly), and exposes her enemies actions (e.g. the Prelacy of Laud; the Independency, sectarianism, covenant breaking and ungodly toleration set forth by the likes of Cromwell [and the Independents that conspired with him]; the Erastianism and civil sectarianism of William of Orange, etc.). It is not likely that you will find a more consistent working out of the principles of Calvinism anywhere. Deals with the most important matters relating to the individual, the family, the church and the state. Sets forth a faithful historical testimony of God's dealings with men during some of the most important days of church history. A basic text that should be mastered by all Christians." -- Publisher
Act, Declaration, and Testimony (1876)
https://archive.org/details/actdeclarationte00refo
Act, Declaration and Testimony, 1761 (edition of 1876.)
"Compared with the 1777 edition, Philadelphia. We hereby certify that this is a true edition of the ORIGINAL JUDICIAL TESTIMONY, emitted by the Reformed Presbytery at Ploughlandhead, Scotland, 1761; together with the Supplements adopted by the Reformed Presbytery at this date, June 2d, 1876. [Signed -- compiler] David Steele, James Campbell, Robert Clyde, Robert Alexander, Committee.
http://www.truecovenanter.com/

*Reformed Presbytery in North America, "Steelite," (David Steele [1803-1887], James Campbell, Thomas Sproull, James Fulton), A Short Vindication of our Covenanted Reformation, 2nd Edition, Revised, and Enlarged by a Committee of the Reformed Presbytery ("Circular" and "Review" prefixed), 1879, 50 pages. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Also available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #2 (also #1, #25, and #30).
"Until the church comes to terms with what is written in this book it will remain weak and divided. Covenant breakers will not prosper, as this rare item demonstrates from both Scripture and history. The power packed ordinance of covenanting (the National and Solemn League and Covenant in particular), was foundational to the second Reformation and the work of the Westminster Assembly. 'By the National Covenant our fathers laid Popery prostrate. By the Solemn League and Covenant they were successful in resisting prelatic encroachments and civil tyranny. By it they were enabled to achieve the Second Reformation . . . They were setting up landmarks by which the location and limits of the city of God will be known at the dawn of the millennial day . . . How can they be said to go forth by the footsteps of the flock, who have declined from the attainments, renounced the covenants and contradicted the testimony of 'the cloud of witnesses. . . . All the schisms (separations) that disfigure the body mystical of Christ . . . are the legitimate consequences of the abandonment of reformation attainments, the violation of covenant engagements.' If you are interested in knowing how to recognize a faithful church (or state), when and why to separate from unfaithful institutions, who has held up the standard of Covenanted Reformation attainments and who has backslidden (and why), what it means to subscribe to the Westminster Confession (1646), (and why most that say they do so today do not have any idea of what that means), and much more concerning individual, family, church and civil, individual, family, church and civil duties, this is one of the best books you will ever lay your hands on. It chronicles 'some instances of worldly conformity and mark(s) some steps of defection from our 'covenanted unity and uniformity,' noting how 'it is necessary to take a retrospect of our history for many years; for we did not all at once reach our present condition of sinful ignorance and manifold apostasy.' Presbyterian and the Reformed churches lay under the heavy hand of God's judgement in our day, because of the very defections noted throughout this fine work. 'We heard (hear) from various quarters the cry, "maintain the truth, stand up for the principles of the Second Reformation;" and yet many of those who are the most loud in uttering this cry, appear desirous to bury in oblivion those imperishable national and ecclesiastical deeds, by which the church and kingdom of Scotland became 'married to the Lord.' Are we married to the Lord, or have we thrown off the covenants of our forefathers; are we the chaste bride of Christ, or a harlot who is found in the bedchambers of every devilish suitor (whether ecclesiastical or civil), who tempts us with the favors of this world? Let us cry out, as with 'the noble Marquis of Argyle, upon the scaffold,' when he said, 'God hath tied us by covenants to religion and reformation. These that were then unborn are yet engaged, and it passeth the power of all the magistrates under heaven to absolve them from the oath of God. They deceive themselves, and it may be, would deceive others, who think otherwise.' Not for the weak of heart." -- Publisher
A Short Vindication of our Covenanted Reformation, Reformed Presbytery
http://www.covenanter.org/reformed/2015/8/24/a-short-vindication-of-our-covenanted-reformation

*Robbins, John W. (1949-2008, editor), The Church Effeminate and Other Essays, ISBN: 0940931540 9780940931541.
Contents: Robbins: The Church; Witherow: The Apostolic Church; Ryle: The True Church; Lloyd-Jones: The Primacy of Preaching; Adams: Preaching to the Heart; Ryle: The Fallibility of Ministers; Crampton: Exclusive Psalmody; The Geneva Service Book of 1556: Scripture and the Ordering of Worship; Miller: The Christian Education of the Children and Youth in the Presbyterian Church; Calvin: The Teachers of the Church; Clark: The Presbyterian Doctrine of Ordination; Warfield: Paul on Women Speaking in Church; Clark: The Ordination of Women; Robbins: The Church Effeminate; Luther: On the Councils and the Church; Hodge: The Relation of Church and State; Calvin: The Roman Church-State; Dostoyevsky: The Grand Inquisitor; Burroughs: Episcopacy; Witherspoon: Secrets of Church Polity; McFetridge: Calvinism and the Church; Chan: The New Babylonian Captivity of the Church; Robbins: The Reconstructionist Road to Rome; a Lasco: The Abolition of Vestments; Hanko: Ought the Church to Pray for Revival? Hodge: The Great Revival of Religion, 1740-1745; Luther: The Power of the Word; Clark: What Is Evangelism? Clark: Art and the Gospel; Calvin: The Necessity of Reforming the Church; Ryle: Idolatry; Ryle: Pharisees and Sadducees; Machen: The Good Fight of Faith; Ryle: Apostolic Fears; Machen: The Separateness of the Church; Robbins: The Sin of Signing Ecumenical Declarations; M'Crie: Fundamentalism and Ecumenism; Calvin: The Unity of the Church; Robbins: The Church Irrational; Index; Scripture Index.
The Necessity of Reforming the Church (1543), by John Calvin
This is an online document.
http://www.swrb.com/newslett/actualnls/NRC_ch00.htm
Calvin's Commentary on Hosea
http://www.iclnet.org/pub/resources/text/m.sion/calvhose.htm

*Robbins, John W. (1949-2008), Ecclesiastical Megalomania: The Economic and Political Thought of the Roman Catholic Church, ISBN: 0940931753 9780940931756.
"This book is a detailed examination of the official statements of the Vatican on economic and political matters. It demonstrates the collectivism and totalitarianism of the Roman Catholic Church-State. It is the only such book written by a Christian in the twentieth century.
"This book explores the conflict between Roman Catholic social thought and human freedom, relying on official pronouncements from the Vatican to show that the political and economic theory of the Roman Church-State justifies feudalism, corporativism, liberation theology, the welfare state, and fascism.
"Dr. John W. Robbins attended Grove City College (A.B. 1969), and The Johns Hopkins University (M.A. 1970, Ph.D. 1973). He has served as chief of staff for a Member of Congress [Ron Paul of Texas], editor of The Freeman magazine, Economist for The Heritage Foundation, and Professor of Political Philosophy in The Freedom School." -- Publisher
Martin Luther, John Calvin, John Knox, Samuel Rutherford, John Owen, Thomas Manton, The Westminster Assembly, James Renwick, Archibald Mason, Christopher Ness, Francis Turretin, The Reformed Presbytery, David Steel, James R. Willson, Alexander M'Leod, William L. Roberts, James Aiken Wylie, Andrew Wilet, Henry Wilkinson, James Wylie, Patrick Fairbairn, James Aiken, Andrew Wilet, Alexander Hislop, Francis Nigel Lee, Arthur W. Pink, and so forth, and so on, have all believed and argued in print that the seated Pope is the Antichrist of the Bible.
The Roman Church-State is "the world's oldest, largest, most powerful and most influential politico-ecclesiastical institution" and it "may also be the world's wealthiest."

*Singer, C. Gregg (1910-1999), A Theological Interpretation of American History, 1994 edition, 354 pages (Greenville, SC: A Press, 1994, 1981, 1975, 1974, 1964), ISBN: 0875524265 9780875524269. A Christian classic.
This book portrays "the influence of theology and the changing doctrines in the life of the church on the pattern of American political, constitutional, social and economic development.
"The author shows that the decline of constitutional government in this country is the result of the departure from historical Christian faith and the resulting rise of alien political philosophies. Particularly does he emphasize the intimate relationship between theological liberalism on the one hand and political, social, and economic liberalism on the other. This theological liberalism has been a major agent in the decline of the Constitution in the political life of the people and in the appearance of a highly centralized government." -- Publisher
"There is between the democratic philosophy and theological liberalism a basic affinity which has placed them in the same camp in many major political struggles.
"This condition exists because theological liberalism shares the basic postulates of the democratic philosophy. . . .
"Theological liberalism at heart has been a continuing protest against Calvinism, particularly against its insistence on the Sovereignty of God and the Total Depravity of the race. These two Biblical doctrines have often proved to be a stumbling block to theologians within the church as well as to the unbelieving world.
"The result of theological liberalism has been the movement away from constitutionalism and away from liberty, and a movement toward collectivistic society and totalitarian regime." -- C. Gregg Singer, A Theological Interpretation of American History, p. 290
See also: John Knox, the Scottish Covenanters, and the Westminster Assembly (tape 3 of 5), in a series of addresses History Notes on Presbyterianism, Reformation, and Theology by Dr. C. Gregg Singer on SermonAudion.com
http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?SID=12607114250
See also:
Dr. C. Gregg Singer at SermonAudio.com (161 messages)
http://www.sermonaudio.com/search.asp?SpeakerOnly=true&currSection=sermonsspeaker&Keyword=Dr.^C.^Gregg^Singer
"The Erastian Revolution, anno 1689, was "utterly inconsistent with the covenanted constitution of the Reformed Church of Scotland, anno 1648."
In fact, the relationship between Church and State has been in decline since 1661. "In early 1661 . . . the Scottish Parliament passed the Act Rescissory, which established the king as supreme judge in all matters civil and ecclesiastical, and which made owning the covenants [National and Solemn League], unlawful. These acts undid all the works of Reformation from 1638 to 1650 and made it high treason to acknowledge Jesus Christ as head of the church. . . ." See: ACT, DECLARATION, AND TESTIMONY, 1876, Part II.
Another turning point occurred in 1758 with the reunion of the Old Side and the New Side of American Presbyterian Church. "This signaled the end of the influence of Calvinism in American Politics." For a detailed discussion see:
From Old School to New School in CROSSED FINGERS: HOW THE LIBERALS CAPTURED THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, by Gary North
http://entrewave.com/freebooks/docs/html/gncf/Chapter02.htm
An example of the positive influence of theological doctrine on American political development is the Presbyterian General Assembly meeting in 1774, in which the Assembly instructed local congregations to press for the dissolution of ties with Great Britain. The result was a flood of resolutions, the most important of which was the Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence which became a pattern for our national Declaration of Independence. See: James Geddes Craighead (1832-1895), SCOTCH AND IRISH SEEDS IN AMERICAN SOIL: THE EARLY HISTORY OF THE SCOTCH AND IRISH CHURCHES, AND THEIR RELATIONS TO THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH OF AMERICA, ISBN: 0790546221 (microfiche).
In 1787 there were two conventions in Philadelphia: the Constitution Convention and a convention of the Presbyterian Church. "In 1787-88, American Presbyterians revised the Westminster Confession of Faith [know as the "American Version (1789)"], in order to make it conform to the political pluralism that also lay behind the U.S. Constitution,(26) which was being ratified at the same time that the presbyteries were voting for the revision of the Confession. The Presbyterians removed that clause in Chapter XXIII:3 which had authorized the civil magistrate to call a synod for advice.(27) This was one of the last traces of the theocratic Calvinism of the Scottish Covenanters -- or Calvin's theocratic Calvinism, for that matter. (The final trace was the Confession's assertion that the failure to take an oath to a lawful authority is a sin [XXII:3]. That provision was abandoned in the 1903 revision, and Machen's Orthodox Presbyterian Church did not restore it in 1936). From that time on, Presbyterians became defenders of a secularized republican order. They believed that God's civil covenant could be made on a common-ground confessional basis, without a mandatory covenantal civil oath, operating under a providential natural law order that did not mandate Trinitarian confession. Obedience to this natural order, they believed, would bring national prosperity.(28) This was the liberal worldview of English Whig politics, and no group in America was more dedicated to defending it than the Presbyterians."(29) -- Gary North, Crossed Fingers, p. 106
Many scholars consider alterations to the Westminster Confession of Faith (1646), originally compiled by the Westminster Assembly of Divines, to be a "reverse plagiarism," an alteration of the original document by someone beside the author, and then passed off to the public, under the original title, as the work of the original authors. Plagiarize: to steal and pass off (the ideas or words of another), as one's own use (a created production), without crediting the source; to commit literary theft: present as new and original an idea or product derived from an existing source. (Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary)
Revisers have altered the content of the original WCF (1646), have removed key doctrine related to Christ's Crown and Covenant, and yet have retained the name given by the Westminster Assembly. Consequently, revisers have deceived many in the Church into believing that their alterations are the work of the Westminster Assembly of Divines in 1646.
Most Presbyterian and Reformed denominations and seminaries today prescribe to the Westminster Confession of Faith (1789), the "American Version." Ideas have consequences. Because theology is truth, when men delete or alter key doctrines, or replace sound doctrine deducted from God's infallible Word by logic, with human imaginations, then the course of history is changed.
For a detailed analysis of the devastating consequences to American history caused by non-Biblical alterations in the Westminster Confession of Faith (1646) and non-Biblical alterations to constitutional government in the United States see the following:
The Topical Listing "A Theological Interpretation of American History"
http://www.lettermen2.com/bcrr9chc.html#stiahis
In Great Britain the Independents and Calvinistic Baptists edited the Westminster Confession (1646) for their own use, but they gave the new confessions a different name, the Savoy Declaration and the Baptist Confession. Certainly this was the honest procedure.
"In 1788 the U.S. Constitution and the revised Westminster Confession were ratified. For a detailed discussion see:
From Old School to New School in CROSSED FINGERS: HOW THE LIBERALS CAPTURED THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, by Gary North
http://entrewave.com/freebooks/docs/html/gncf/Chapter03.htm
See also the following:
Appendix A: Major Changes of the Savoy Declaration
http://www.bible-researcher.com/wescoappa.html
Appendix B: Major Changes of the PCUSA (1788-1958)
http://www.bible-researcher.com/wescoappb.html
Appendix C: Major Changes of the UPCUSA and PCUS (1958-1983)
http://www.bible-researcher.com/wescoappc.html
Preface to Confession and Catechisms of the Orthodox Presbyterian Church (OPC)
http://opc.org/documents/Preface.pdf
Trinitarianism Verses Polytheism: Unresolved Questions of Article VI, Section 3 of the U.S. Constitution
http://members.aol.com/vtpa/pvtpa001.html
Selection of Covenant Heads for Positions of Leadership
http://www.lettermen2.com/bcrr9chc.html#covenantheads
Timeline of the liberalization of the Presbyterian Church in Crossed Fingers by Gary North
http://entrewave.com/freebooks/docs/html/gncf/timeline.htm
A THEOLOGICAL INTERPRETATION OF AMERICAN HISTORY, Chapter 6, "Theological Liberalism After 1920 and its Political Consequence."
A Partial Timeline of US History Showing how Liberalization in the Church, and Liberalization in the State, has Been Paralleled by Advances in the Feminist Movement, and the Overall Decline of American Society
http://www.lettermen2.com/bcrr9chc.html#ptushlcs.
*Price, Greg L., Biblical Civil Government Versus the Beast; and, the Basis for Civil Resistance. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #26.
"This is the best modern testimony for the biblical principles of civil magistracy -- which were so prominent during the height of the Second Reformation -- that we have seen. Price documents the teachings of many of the major Reformers (and some of the church fathers), and in an easy reading manner simplifies what can at times become a very complex subject. This particular Reformation message, proclaiming Christ's Kingship over the nations (and the practical outworking of the same), has been buried from the view of the general public for some time now, but is once again being brought to light in this very helpful introductory book. A sobering appendix has been added (written by a friend of the Covenanted Reformation), which shows why it is unlawful for a Christian to swear any oath to uphold and defend the U.S. Constitution. This appendix also compares the points of difference between classic (or historic), Reformed teaching and modern Reformed teaching regarding magistracy and religion. Special attention is given to the OPC, the PCA and the RPCNA and the changes that these groups have made to second Reformation confessional standards (concerning matters related to the civil magistrate). Statements by B.B. Warfield are also contrasted to the older Reformed views. You won't find a better easy-to-read and easy to understand introduction to this important topic -- a topic which impacts directly on every Christian's testimony for the crown rights of King Jesus!" -- Publisher
"It is this author's contention that the modern churches have let go of this important piece of the faith [Christ's Kingship over the nations -- compiler], once for all delivered to the saints. Thereby they have delivered the church, not to kings as nursing fathers, but to the cruel civil domination of the enemies of the true religion, their sheep being taught that they must submit passively to every pretended civil authority as the ordinance of God. By this defection, these leaders of the flock have also undermined the magistracy, allowing and even encouraging wicked men to remove this blessed ordinance from its foundation in God its creator, and from its subjection to Christ His King, thereby directly opposing God's benevolent ends in instituting civil government: 'Thus have [they] made the commandment of God of none effect by [their] tradition. . . . teaching for doctrines the commandments of men' (Matthew 15:6,9). Furthermore, by their false teaching regarding civil government, they have made themselves guilty of the very sin of which we are often accused: opposing the ordinance of God. If this wasn't enough, however, consider that their sin is worse than that of the garden variety rebel, inasmuch as their opposition to God's institution is not so much practical as it is principal; and because of their position as teachers and guides of the flock of God. 'Be not many masters, knowing that we shall receive the greater condemnation. . . . For we can do nothing against the truth, but for the truth.' (James 3:1; II Cor. 13:8 [2 Corinthians 13:8]) -- Greg Price Biblical Civil Government Verses the Beast, p. 64
Biblical Civil Government Versus the Beast; and, the Basis for Civil Resistance, Greg Price
http://www.swrb.com/newslett/actualnls/BibCG_GP.htm
After 1920 "Forces of liberalism were able to gain a commanding position in the liberal arts colleges and seminaries run by most of the major denominations. . . .
"The denial of the inspiration and infallibility of the Scripture proved to be tantamount to a rejection of their doctrinal authority; one by one, the great evangelical doctrines of the past were rewritten in such a way as to be scarcely recognizable. . ." -- C. Gregg Singer, A Theological Interpretation of American History, p. 187
"The basic issue is the reduction of the total scope of government, on both the federal and state level, to those spheres which are clearly conferred upon it by the Scriptures, and the surrender of those extra-Biblical powers which liberal political philosophies and practice have given to it during the last one hundred years or so. . . .
"When Jesus Christ returns, this span of history will cease. Perhaps at this point the cleavage between the biblical position and the views of Hegel, Marx, Spengler, Toynbee, and other contemporaries, becomes most obvious. The modern mind simply cannot accept the idea that humanity does not control its own destiny. It refuses to believe that the ultimate manifestation of the glory of Jesus Christ is beyond all human manipulation, whether they be statesmen or educators. It denies that the sovereign Ruler of the universe will bring all sinful humanity to judgment in a final accounting for its long history of willful rebellion against His righteousness, goodness, and mercy." -- Gregg C. Singer
The roots of liberty and limited government are in the Protestant Reformation. We believe the key to the maintenance of liberty and limited government is to be found in the Scottish covenanting struggle. -- James A. Dodson

Swancara, Frank, Thomas Jefferson Versus Religious Oppression.
"Swancara was a journalist, wrote book in his old age, apparently had an obsession with 'religious oppression,' Jefferson was a hero of his, he actually studied the collection of Jefferson's library, Jefferson gave it to the Library of Congress when it was formed.
"Swancara was godless and argued everything from the wrong side, but it is the best listing of public documents and legislation calling for religious tests for office holders that I have seen, goes back to English law which prohibited a man from being a member of Parliament unless he believed there was going to be a final judgement and our actions have eternal consequences. Swancara unwittingly produced a valuable work for the reformer." -- Reader's Comment

*Thornwell, James H. (1812-1862), Collected Writings of James Henley Thornwell, 4 volumes, ISBN: 0524059632 9780524059630. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.

Vol. I. LECTURES ON THE DOCTRINE OF GOD AND ON DIVINE GOVERNMENT (672 pages)
Vol. II. THE DOCTRINES OF GRACE; SERMONS; DISCOURSES ON TRUTH (632 pages)
Vol. III. THEOLOGICAL AND CONTROVERSIAL; RATIONALIST CONTROVERSY: REASON, REVELATION AND MIRACLES; PAPAL CONTROVERSY; BAPTISM, JUSTIFICATION, INFALLIBILITY, THE APOCRYPHA (824 pages)
Vol. IV. WRITINGS ON THE CHURCH: CHURCH OFFICERS; CHURCH OPERATIONS; CHURCH DISCIPLINES; THE SOUTHERN PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, ETC., SERMONS AND APPENDICES (640 pages)
"J.W. Alexander once wrote the following of one of Thornwell's sermons, 'His sermon was a model of what is rare, viz.: burning hot argument, logic in ignition, and glowing more and more to the end.'
"Henry Ward Beecher, the famous Northern liberal minister, wrote after Thornwell's death, 'By common fame, Dr. Thornwell was the most brilliant minister in the Old School Presbyterian Church, and the most brilliant debater in the General Assembly. This reputation he early gained and never lost. Whenever he was present in the Assembly, he was always the first person pointed out to a stranger.'
"Dr. D. Martyn Lloyd-Jones said of him, 'Thornwell was one of the greatest preachers that America has ever produced'." -- Publisher
See particularly, "Relation of the State to Christ" and "National Sins: a fast-day sermon, preached in the Presbyterian Church, Columbia, Wednesday, November 21, 1860.
THE RELATION OF THE STATE TO CHRIST "is the petition of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the Confederate States of America to the Congress of the Confederate States of America, then sitting in Richmond, Virginia. It argues that though the newly formed Confederate Constitution was admirable in many respects, it still laboured 'under one capital defect,' that being that it was not 'distinctively Christian.' It asks the Confederate Congress to 'express the precise relations which the Government of these States ought to sustain to the religion of Jesus Christ.' Suggests 'the following or equivalent terms, to be added to the section providing for liberty of conscience: Nevertheless we, the people of these Confederate States, distinctly acknowledge our responsibility to God, and the supremacy of His Son, Jesus Christ, as King of kings and Lord of lords; and hereby ordain that no law shall be passed by the Congress of these Confederate States inconsistent with the will of God, as revealed in the Holy Scripture'." -- Publisher

See also: The sovereign grace of god: his everlasting mercy and lovingkindness, The doctrine of man (human nature, total depravity), Selection of covenant heads for positions of leadership, God's sovereign hand in history, History, "his-story," Church history and history of local churches, The history of reformation of the church, Church and state, The history of martyrs, Background, foundation, and history of the covenanted reformation of scotland, The christian foundation of america, colonial history, Revisionist history, The decline of american society, irrationality, the decline of western thought, Corporate faithfulness and sanctification, Sin and its consequence: physical and spiritual death, Unfaithful reformed ministries, Unfaithful reformed ministries, Toleration the enemy of truth, Conspiracy and corruption, Pseudo-christian movements: a selection of works, and so forth, and so on.

Related WebLinks

The Westminster Confession of Faith (1646), (The Westminster Standards) and Related Works: A Study Guide
http://www.lettermen2.com/suggest.html

The Revolution Settlement of the Church of Scotland: Its Provisions, in Several Respects, Inconsistent With the Approved Principles of the Second Reformation, 1841, John Graham. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #30.
Available in Lectures on the Principles of the Second Reformation
http://www.covenanter.org/reformed/2015/8/18/the-reformed-presbyterian-churchs-of-scotland-lectures-on-the-principles-of-the-second-reformation

The Covenanted Reformation of Scotland Author/Title Listing
http://www.lettermen2.com/bcrr9chb.html#crsstl

Singer, C. Gregg (1910-1999), John Knox, the Scottish Covenanters, and the Westminster Assembly, Acts 1:11; Romans 13 (1 of 3 audio files [MP3]). Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
"Great historical teaching, Singer at his best!" -- Publisher
http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?SID=124071413102

Singer, C. Gregg (1910-1999), John Knox, the Scottish Covenanters, and the Westminster Assembly, Hebrews 11:39; 1 Peter 2:13-14 (2 of 3 audio files [MP3]). Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
"Great historical teaching, Singer at his best!" -- Publisher
http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?SID=125071244422

Singer, C. Gregg (1910-1999), John Knox, the Scottish Covenanters, and the Westminster Assembly, Daniel 4:35; Acts 13:17 (3 of 3 audio files [MP3]). Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
"Great historical teaching, Singer at his best!" -- Publisher
http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?SID=12607114250

The Reformation in England 1 of 2 (the Providential Historical Preparation for the Westminster Assembly)
http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?SID=12607144153

The Reformation in England 2 of 2 (and America)
http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?SID=126071623510

Works of C. Gregg Singer
http://www.lettermen2.com/bcrr3ch.html#cgsinger

A Letter From George Whitefield to the Rev. Mr. John Wesley in Answer to Mr. Wesley's Sermon Entitled "Free Grace"
In George Whitefield: The Life and Times of the Great Evangelist of the 18th Century Revival, 2 volumes (Carlisle, PA: The Banner of Truth Trust), ISBN: 0851510264 9780851510262 085151300X 9780851513003.
Arnold Dallimore explains in detail how Wesley's possibly contrived difference with Whitefield over "sinless perfection" had the effect of carving out a 'spiritual empire' for John Wesley and of bringing him to pre-eminence.
See also "Iain Murray on Whitefield and Wesley."
http://www.spurgeon.org/~phil/wesley.php

Iain Murray on Whitefield and Wesley
"This article first appeared in the 1960 edition of Whitefield's Journals, published by The Banner of Truth Trust. Here Iain Murray discusses the historical background that led to George Whitefield's famous letter to John Wesley."
http://www.spurgeon.org/~phil/wesley/murray.php

Timeline of the liberalization of the Presbyterian Church in Crossed Fingers by Gary North
http://entrewave.com/freebooks/docs/html/gncf/timeline.htm

The Biblical Solution to Terrorism
http://www.lettermen2.com/bcrrappd.html#terror



Background, Foundation, and History of the Covenanted Reformation of Scotland

For the Lord is our Judge, the Lord is our Lawgiver, the Lord is our King; He will save us. (Isaiah 33:22)
Isaiah's Prophesy after the Angel of the Lord smote Sennacherib's army for good King Hezekiah.

Blessed is the nation whose God is the LORD; and the people whom he hath chosen for his own inheritance. (Psalm 33:12)

See the Theological Notes, "The Greatness of God," at 1 Chronicles 29:11 in The Reformation Study Bible.

See the Theological Notes, "The Wisdom and Will of God," at Daniel 2:20 in The Reformation Study Bible.

See the Theological Notes, "God's Pattern for Worship," at 1 Chronicles 16:29 in The Reformation Study Bible.

And it came to pass, when Samuel was old, that he made his sons judges over Israel.
Now the name of his firstborn was Joel; and the name of his second, Abiah: they were judges in Beersheba.
And his sons walked not in his ways, but turned aside after lucre, and took bribes, and perverted judgment.
Then all the elders of Israel gathered themselves together, and came to Samuel unto Ramah,
And said unto him, Behold, thou art old, and thy sons walk not in thy ways: now make us a king to judge us like all the nations.
But the thing displeased Samuel, when they said, Give us a king to judge us. And Samuel prayed unto the LORD.
And the LORD said unto Samuel, Hearken unto the voice of the people in all that they say unto thee: for they have not rejected thee, but they have rejected me, that I should not reign over them.
According to all the works which they have done since the day that I brought them up out of Egypt even unto this day, wherewith they have forsaken me, and served other gods, so do they also unto thee.
Now therefore hearken unto their voice: howbeit yet protest solemnly unto them, and shew them the manner of the king that shall reign over them.
And Samuel told all the words of the LORD unto the people that asked of him a king.
And he said, This will be the manner of the king that shall reign over you: He will take your sons, and appoint them for himself, for his chariots, and to be his horsemen; and some shall run before his chariots.
And he will appoint him captains over thousands, and captains over fifties; and will set them to ear his ground, and to reap his harvest, and to make his instruments of war, and instruments of his chariots.
And he will take your daughters to be confectionaries, and to be cooks, and to be bakers.
And he will take your fields, and your vineyards, and your oliveyards, even the best of them, and give them to his servants.
And he will take the tenth of your seed, and of your vineyards, and give to his officers, and to his servants.
And he will take your menservants, and your maidservants, and your goodliest young men, and your asses, and put them to his work.
He will take the tenth of your sheep: and ye shall be his servants.
And ye shall cry out in that day because of your king which ye shall have chosen you; and the LORD will not hear you in that day.
Nevertheless the people refused to obey the voice of Samuel; and they said, Nay; but we will have a king over us;
That we also may be like all the nations; and that our king may judge us, and go out before us, and fight our battles.
And Samuel heard all the words of the people, and he rehearsed them in the ears of the LORD.
And the LORD said to Samuel, Hearken unto their voice, and make them a king. And Samuel said unto the men of Israel, Go ye every man unto his city.
(1 Samuel 8:1-22)

Now in the twenty and fourth day of this month the children of Israel were assembled with fasting, and with sackclothes, and earth upon them. And the seed of Israel separated themselves from all strangers, and stood and confessed their sins, and the iniquities of their fathers. And they stood up in their place, and read in the book of the law of the LORD their God one fourth part of the day; and another fourth part they confessed, and worshipped the LORD their God.
Then stood up upon the stairs, of the Levites, Jeshua, and Bani, Kadmiel, Shebaniah, Bunni, Sherebiah, Bani, and Chenani, and cried with a loud voice unto the LORD their God. Then the Levites, Jeshua, and Kadmiel, Bani, Hashabniah, Sherebiah, Hodijah, Shebaniah, and Pethahiah, said,
Stand up and bless the LORD your God for ever and ever:
And blessed be thy glorious name, which is exalted above all blessing and praise. Thou, even thou, art LORD alone; thou hast made heaven, the heaven of heavens, with all their host, the earth, and all things that are therein, the seas, and all that is therein, and thou preservest them all; and the host of heaven worshippeth thee.
Thou art the LORD the God, who didst choose Abram, and broughtest him forth out of Ur of the Chaldees, and gavest him the name of Abraham; And foundest his heart faithful before thee, and madest a covenant with him to give the land of the Canaanites, the Hittites, the Amorites, and the Perizzites, and the Jebusites, and the Girgashites, to give it, I say, to his seed, and hast performed thy words; for thou art righteous:
And didst see the affliction of our fathers in Egypt, and heardest their cry by the Red sea; And shewedst signs and wonders upon Pharaoh, and on all his servants, and on all the people of his land: for thou knewest that they dealt proudly against them. So didst thou get thee a name, as it is this day. And thou didst divide the sea before them, so that they went through the midst of the sea on the dry land; and their persecutors thou threwest into the deeps, as a stone into the mighty waters. Moreover thou leddest them in the day by a cloudy pillar; and in the night by a pillar of fire, to give them light in the way wherein they should go.
Thou camest down also upon mount Sinai, and spakest with them from heaven, and gavest them right judgments, and true laws, good statutes and commandments: And madest known unto them thy holy sabbath, and commandedst them precepts, statutes, and laws, by the hand of Moses thy servant: And gavest them bread from heaven for their hunger, and broughtest forth water for them out of the rock for their thirst, and promisedst them that they should go in to possess the land which thou hadst sworn to give them.
But they and our fathers dealt proudly, and hardened their necks, and hearkened not to thy commandments, And refused to obey, neither were mindful of thy wonders that thou didst among them; but hardened their necks, and in their rebellion appointed a captain to return to their bondage: but thou art a God ready to pardon, gracious and merciful, slow to anger, and of great kindness, and forsookest them not.
Yea, when they had made them a molten calf, and said, This is thy God that brought thee up out of Egypt, and had wrought great provocations; Yet thou in thy manifold mercies forsookest them not in the wilderness: the pillar of the cloud departed not from them by day, to lead them in the way; neither the pillar of fire by night, to shew them light, and the way wherein they should go. Thou gavest also thy good spirit to instruct them, and withheldest not thy manna from their mouth, and gavest them water for their thirst. Yea, forty years didst thou sustain them in the wilderness, so that they lacked nothing; their clothes waxed not old, and their feet swelled not.
Moreover thou gavest them kingdoms and nations, and didst divide them into corners: so they possessed the land of Sihon, and the land of the king of Heshbon, and the land of Og king of Bashan. Their children also multipliedst thou as the stars of heaven, and broughtest them into the land, concerning which thou hadst promised to their fathers, that they should go in to possess it. So the children went in and possessed the land, and thou subduedst before them the inhabitants of the land, the Canaanites, and gavest them into their hands, with their kings, and the people of the land, that they might do with them as they would. And they took strong cities, and a fat land, and possessed houses full of all goods, wells digged, vineyards, and oliveyards, and fruit trees in abundance: so they did eat, and were filled, and became fat, and delighted themselves in thy great goodness.
Nevertheless they were disobedient, and rebelled against thee, and cast thy law behind their backs, and slew thy prophets which testified against them to turn them to thee, and they wrought great provocations. Therefore thou deliveredst them into the hand of their enemies, who vexed them: and in the time of their trouble, when they cried unto thee, thou heardest them from heaven; and according to thy manifold mercies thou gavest them saviours, who saved them out of the hand of their enemies.
But after they had rest, they did evil again before thee: therefore leftest thou them in the hand of their enemies, so that they had the dominion over them: yet when they returned, and cried unto thee, thou heardest them from heaven; and many times didst thou deliver them according to thy mercies; And testifiedst against them, that thou mightest bring them again unto thy law: yet they dealt proudly, and hearkened not unto thy commandments, but sinned against thy judgments (which if a man do, he shall live in them), and withdrew the shoulder, and hardened their neck, and would not hear. Yet many years didst thou forbear them, and testifiedst against them by thy spirit in thy prophets: yet would they not give ear: therefore gavest thou them into the hand of the people of the lands. Nevertheless for thy great mercies' sake thou didst not utterly consume them, nor forsake them; for thou art a gracious and merciful God.
Now therefore, our God, the great, the mighty, and the terrible God, who keepest covenant and mercy, let not all the trouble seem little before thee, that hath come upon us, on our kings, on our princes, and on our priests, and on our prophets, and on our fathers, and on all thy people, since the time of the kings of Assyria unto this day. Howbeit thou art just in all that is brought upon us; for thou hast done right, but we have done wickedly: Neither have our kings, our princes, our priests, nor our fathers, kept thy law, nor hearkened unto thy commandments and thy testimonies, wherewith thou didst testify against them. For they have not served thee in their kingdom, and in thy great goodness that thou gavest them, and in the large and fat land which thou gavest before them, neither turned they from their wicked works.
Behold, we are servants this day, and for the land that thou gavest unto our fathers to eat the fruit thereof and the good thereof, behold, we are servants in it: And it yieldeth much increase unto the kings whom thou hast set over us because of our sins: also they have dominion over our bodies, and over our cattle, at their pleasure, and we are in great distress. And because of all this we make a sure covenant, and write it; and our princes, Levites, and priests, seal unto it.
(Nehemiah 9)

The prophets are advocates for God in a covenantal lawsuit. For their arguments for the continued obligation of covenantal faithfulness and the hope of God's covenantal faithfulness see:

  • Isaiah, a covenant prosecutor,
  • Jeremiah's theme of judgment for covenant breaking,
  • The themes of the wrath, severity, covenant faithfulness, trustworthiness, and ultimate goodness of God in the book of Lamentations,
  • Ezekiel's message of judgment against Israel, then judgment against foreign nations, and then grace and mercy to Israel, and the themes of the holiness, transcendence, grace, mercy, and sovereignty of God along with individual responsibility,
  • Daniel, the covenant head, with his theme of the absolute sovereignty of God in the affairs of man,
  • Hosea's theme of covenant relationship,
  • Joel's themes of covenant, the day of the Lord, and repentance unfeigned,
  • Amos furthering the prosecution's case for the covenantal lawsuit with themes of idolatry and social injustice,
  • The emphasis on God's sovereign justice by Obadiah,
  • Jonah's themes of the sovereignty of God and the universality of God's goodness,
  • The themes of Micah, covenant relationship, salvation is of the Lord, the church rebellious and perverse, and judgment followed by restoration,
  • Nahum's theme of God's government of history according to his covenant,
  • Habakkuk, the forefather of the Reformation, and his themes of God is sovereign in history and persistence in prayer,
  • Zephaniah's themes of covenant, the day of the Lord, and the restorative nature of God's wrath,
  • Haggai's theme of covenant,
  • Zechariah's themes of the presence, kingship and deliverance of God and Christ, and Christ dwelling among his people, and
  • Malachi, another advocate of God in the covenant lawsuit, with his themes of the continued obligation of covenantal faithfulness, and hope.
  • See Isaiah 40:1 -- Isaiah 55:13 and annotations in The Reformation Study Bible.

    And I will give them an heart to know me, that I am the LORD: and they shall be my people, and I will be their God: for they shall return unto me with their whole heart. (Jeremiah 24:7)

    In the final analysis, all modern ills, spiritual and temporal, are traceable to our continuing departure from the principles of the Second Reformation. . . . In particular, I am convinced that the Lord will not bless a church at peace with his enemies. Our departure from truth has led to our undernourished condition as a church; truth, as Thornwell argued, is the only food that the soul can digest.
    It does no good to blame society or the church for our deficiencies before the Lord because Christ holds men, not churches and states, accountable. In the words of Hugh Miller, "Churches, however false and detestable, are never to be summoned to the bar of judgment. . . . To Christ, as his head and king, must every man render an account."
    The great heresy of our times is that all men are children of God. Those within the church have lost their identity as a people of God, united in spirit and purpose. We have adopted the half-truths of our fathers for which Judah faced punishment: Because they have despised the law of the Lord, and have not kept his commandments, and their lies caused them to err, after which their fathers have walked (Amos 2:4b). Nevertheless, Christ loves his church, and he will see to it that his bride is prepared (Ephesians 5:27), for the great banquet. Based on the history of God's people, the needed corrections will result from either prayer or persecution, leading the people to renew their covenant promises. Let us pray that God's kingdom come, and let us covenant to fulfill our obligations to be his people. When persecution comes, let us pray that we would stand as firm as did the Scottish Covenanters. When covenanting comes, let us praise the Lord, for only in him will we stand firm. Let us ever strive to make it possible for our children to utter one of James Nisbet's praises, "O my soul! Bless and praise the Lord that I was born in a land where the glad tidings of the everlasting gospel are published and pressed with so much purity and plainness." This should be our prayer, Turn us again, O God, and cause thy face to shine; and we shall be saved (Psalm 80:3). -- Edwin Nesbit Moore from the conclusion to Our Covenant Heritage: The Covenanters' Struggle for Unity in Truth as Revealed in the Memoir of James Nisbet (1667-1728), and Sermons of John Nevay (d. 1672)

    A doctrine once held to be important by early Presbyterians and most Puritans that, today, is largely forgotten and even held in disrepute is social or national covenanting. The Presbyterians of the First and Second Reformation periods of Scotland were so dedicated to socio-religious covenanting as a biblical tool for reformation and solidifying national religious attainments that they came to be called Covenanters. They took seriously Jesus' command to disciple whole nations (cf. Matthew 28:18-20). They believed that this Commission is not fulfilled until every nation bows the knee to Christ and covenants with Him. The Puritans understood that the Bible presents Israel, including its covenant and covenant law code (excluding any laws that have been abrogated or set out of gear by the death of Christ), as a model for all nations (cf. Deuteronomy 4:5-8). The gospel of Jesus Christ is to transform individuals and even whole cultures and nations. It should result in progressive sanctification in society as people learn all that Christ has commanded. When the majority of people are committed to the Lord, they will formally recognize the Redeemer in their constitutions; will establish the true Christian religion on a national and local level; and will seek to base all their laws on the law of God revealed in Scripture.
    In the book Rev. Schwertley not only sets forth the biblical case for social or national covenanting in a simple, organized and comprehensive manner, but also critiques the modern Presbyterian alternative to the original Presbyterian teaching on this and related topics. -- Publisher, National Covenanting and Christ's Victory Over the Nations

    The Treasury of David, Psalm 89, C.H. Spurgeon
    I have made a covenant with my chosen, I have sworn unto David my servant, Thy seed will I establish for ever, and build up thy throne to all generations. (Psalm 89:3,4)
    http://www.spurgeon.org/treasury/ps089.php

    The Treasury of David, Psalm 147, C.H. Spurgeon
    http://www.spurgeon.org/treasury/ps147.php

    [1]Then shall be the [2]end, when he hath delivered up the kingdom to God, even the Father, when he hath put down [3]all rule, and all authority and power.
    For he must reign
    [j: Psalm 110:1; Acts 2:34; Hebrews 1:13; Hebrews 10:13]till he hath put all his enemies [1]under his feet.
    The
    [1]last enemy that shall be destroyed, is death.
    [k: Psalm 86; Hebrews 2:8]For he hath put down all things under his feet. (And when he saith that all things are subdued to him, it is manifest that he is excepted, which did put down all things under him.)
    And when all things shall be subdued unto him,
    [1]then shall the Son also himself be subject unto him, that did subdue all things under him, that [2]God may be all in all. -- (1 Corinthians 15:24-28, 1599 Geneva Bible)
    15:24 (1) The fourth argument, wherewith also he confirmeth the others, hath a most sure ground, to wit, because that God must reign. And this is the manner of his reign, that the Father will be showed to be King in his Son who was made man, to whom all things are made subject (the promiser only except) to the end that the Father may afterward triumph in his Son the conqueror. And he maketh two parts of this reign and dominion of the Son, wherein the Father's glory consisteth: to wit, the overcoming of his enemies (whereof some must be deprived of all power, as Satan and all the wicked, be they never so proud and mighty, and others must be utterly abolished as death) and a plain and full delivery of the godly from all enemies, that by this means God may fully set forth the body of the Church, cleaving fast to their head Christ, his kingdom and glory as a king in his subjects. Moreover he putteth the first degree of this kingdom in the resurrection of the Son, who is the head: and the perfection, in the full conjunction of the members with the head, which shall be in the latter day. Now all these tend to this purpose, to show that unless the dead do rise again, neither the Father can be King above all, neither Christ be Lord of all: for neither should the power of Satan and death be overcome, nor the glory of God be full in his Son, nor his Son in his members.
    (2) The shutting up and finishing of all things.
    (3) All his enemies which shall be spoiled of all the power they have.
    15:25 (1) Christ is considered here, as he appeared in the form of a servant, in which respect he ruleth the Church as head, and that because this power was given him of his Father.
    15:26 (1) The shutting up of the argument, which is taken from the whole to the part: for if all his enemies shall be put under his feet, then must it needs be that death also shall be subdued under him.
    15:28 (1) Not because the Son was not subject to his Father before, but because his body, that is to say, the Church which is here in distress, and not yet wholly partaker of his glory, is not yet fully perfect, and also because the bodies of the saints which be in the graves shall not be glorified until the resurrection: but Christ as he is God, hath us subject to him as his Father hath, but as he is Priest, he is subject to his father together with us. Augustine, book 1, chap. 8, of the Trinity.
    (2) By this high kind of speech, is set forth an incomprehensible glory which floweth from God, and shall fill all of us, as we are joined together with our head, but yet so, that our head shall always reserve his preeminence. -- 1599 Geneva Bible annotation for 1 Corinthians 15:24-28

    The Erastian Revolution, anno 1689, was "utterly inconsistent with the covenanted constitution of the Reformed Church of Scotland, anno 1648."
    In fact, the relationship between Church and State has been in decline since 1661. "In early 1661 . . . the Scottish Parliament passed the Act Rescissory, which established the king as supreme judge in all matters civil and ecclesiastical, and which made owning the covenants [National and Solemn League], unlawful. These acts undid all the works of Reformation from 1638 to 1650 and made it high treason to acknowledge Jesus Christ as head of the church. . . ." See: ACT, DECLARATION, AND TESTIMONY, 1876, Part II.

    Abbott, Angus Evan, The Scottish Covenanters.

    Acheson, Thomas Houston, Why Covenanters do not Vote.
    Why Covenanters do not Vote, Thomas Acheson
    http://www.covenanter.org/reformed/2016/11/4/why-covenanters-do-not-vote?

    Aiton, J., The Life and Times of Alexander Henderson, Giving a History of the Second Reformation of the Church of Scotland, and of the Covenanters, During the Reign of Charles I, 1836.
    The Life and Times of Alexander Henderson: Giving a History of the Second Reformation of the Church of Scotland, and of the Covenanters, During the Reign of Charles I
    http://books.google.com/books?id=fEIRAAAAIAAJ&ie=ISO-8859-1&output=html

    Anderson, John, The Bass Rock: Martyrs of the Bass, 1847

    Anderson, John, The Footsteps of the Flock, 1843,

    Anderson, William (1805-1866), The Scottish Nation; or, The Surnames, Families, Literature, Honours, and Biographical History of the People of Scotland, 1882, ISBN: 0788402455 9780788402456.

    *Anderson, William, The Voice of Renwick, The Last of the Scottish Martyrs, 1882. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
    "A rare work setting forth the stirring story of the young minister and martyr James Renwick. It explains the main points (of Covenanted Reformation), for which he and many other Covenanters suffered and died. Also makes practical applications which can be applied to today. -- Publisher

    Anonymous, Articles of Military Discipline, Edinburgh, 1639. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.

    Anonymous, An Attestation to the Testimony of our Reverend Brethren of the Province of London to the Truth of Jesus Christ, and to our Solemn League and Covenant as also against the errours, heresies, and blasphemies of these times, and the toleration of them, resolved on by the ministers of Cheshire, at their meeting May 2, and subscribed at their next meeting, June 6, 1648

    Anonymous, A Brief Account of the Moral and Political Acts of the Kings and Queens of England, From William the Conqueror to the Revolution in the Year 1688. . . . London, 1793.

    Anonymous, The Concurrent Testimony of the Ministers in the County of VViltes, With Their Reverend Brethren the Ministers of the Province of london, to the Truth of Jesus Christ, and to the Solemn League and Covenant: As also, against the errors, heresies, and blasphemies of these times, and the toleration of them, 1648.

    Anonymous, The Declarations of the Witnesses That Survived the Late Persecution. Published at Sanquhair. . . . Paisley, 1778.

    Anonymous, A Dissenting Presbytery. The Vindication of Mr. James Gilchrist, Minister of the Gospel at Dunscore. Alternate title: THE VINDICATION OF MR. JAMES GILCHRIST, MINISTER OF THE GOSPEL AT DUNSCORE: FROM THE UNJUST AND CALUMNIOUS ASPERSIONS, WHEREWITH HE IS CHARGED, IN A LYBEL SENT TO HIM BY THE PRETENDED PRESBYTERY OF DRUMFREIS, UPON THE 8TH OF JULY 1715 YEARS.
    http://www.truecovenanter.com/kirkgovt/gilchrist_james_vindication.html

    Anonymous, Eschol Grapes or, Some of the Ancient Boundaries, and Covenanted March Stones, set up by Kirk and State, in the Days When They Acted for the Lord, . . . Betwixt 1638 and 1649. . . . ([Edinburgh?]: Printed in the year, 1708). Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.

    Anonymous, Good Newes From the Assembly in Scotland, Novv Sitting in Consultation, Concerning Their Ecclesiasticall Government in the Church: Exhibited to this Parliament in England, concerning this present reformation in England, with their heartie desires this ensuing treatise may be forthwith enacted; for the satisfaction of all good subjects, here or elsewhere. From Edenburgh, August 4. 1642. Scotland. (London: printed for J. W., 1642).

    Anonymous, The Grand Indictment of High-treason Exhibited Against the Marques of Argyle, 1661.

    Anonymous, The Hearty Concurrence of Divers Citizens and Inhabitants of the City of London With the Ministers of the Province Thereof to Their Testimony, to the Truth of Jesus Christ and to our Solemn League and Covenant: as Also Against the Errours, Heresies and Blasphemies of These Times, and the Toleration of Them, 1648.

    Anonymous, Protesters Vindicated: Or, A Just and Necessary Defence of Protesting Against, and Withdrawing from This National Church of Scotland on Account of Her Many Gross and Continued Defections, 1716. Alternate title: PROTESTERS VINDICATED: OR, A JUST AND NECESSARY DEFENCE OF PROTESTING AGAINST, AND WITHDRAWING FROM THIS NATIONAL CHURCH OF SCOTLAND; ON ACCOUNT OF HER MANY GROSS AND CONTINUED DEFECTIONS, 1716. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #27.
    "The title continues: 'More particularly, her approving of, and going into the legal establishment of the Prelatic constitutions of England. The generality of ministers swearing, in the Oath of Abjuration, to maintain Erastianism, Prelacy, and English Popish Ceremonies. Non-Jurants joining with Jurants, judicially approving that practice to be free of scandal. The Church's establishing tyranny in government, against all who will not join in communion with her, and approve her practices without redress of grievances. Wherein these and several other causes of withdrawing are proven to be justly chargeable on the Church, demonstrated to be contrary to the Word of God and Reformed principles of this Church, and just grounds of withdrawing, and setting up judicatures distinct from her; and the objections of Jurants and others fully answered.' This is a classic, detailed statement of the old covenanted principles and the biblical attainments of the Second Reformation (like the Solemn League and Covenant, the Westminster Standards, etc.). It is also an excellent defense against the modern malignants who counsel Christ's children to remain in the backsliding and covenant breaking denominations that abound in our day. Very Rare!" -- Publisher

    Anonymous, The Reasons Agreed Upon by the Reformers of the Church of Scotland, for Which the Book of Common-prayer, Urged Upon Scotland, Anno 1637. was Refused.
    Reasons for Refusing the Book of Common Prayer
    http://www.truecovenanter.com/worship/reasons_against_book_of_common_prayer.html
    Graham, George (Bishop of Orkney), The Reasons Agreed Upon by the Reformers of the Church of Scotland, for Which the Book of Common-Prayer, Urged Upon Scotland, Anno 1637, was Refused: As Also the Reasons Agreed Upon by the Assembly of Divines at Westminster, for Laying Aside the English Book of Common-Prayer (1744)
    http://archive.org/details/reasonsagreedupo00grah

    Anonymous, The Reformed Dissenter, or A Conference Between a Conformist and a Separatist Concerning Communion With the Church of England, 1684.

    Anonymous, A Remonstrance to the Presbyterians, Concerning the Government Established in the Church of England. And a Vindication of Episcopacy From its First Original, and Divine Institution. Published by Order, 1660.

    Anonymous, Some Predictions or Prophesies, of . . . Mr. Thomas Lundie, Mr. Samuel Rutherford, Mr. John Welsh, Mr. Richard Cameron, Mr. Alexander Peden, Mr. James Renwick, and Others: . . . To Which is Added, a Letter Written by Mr John MacClelland, . . . to John Lord Kirkcudbright: as Also a Note of a Sermon Preached by Said Mr. John MacClelland, . . . With an Epitaph Upon Mr. John MacClelland, Written by Himself . . . Likewise, an Account of an Apparition in the castle of Edinburgh, in the Year 1651 or 1652.

    Anonymous, Some Reasons by a Divine of the Kirk of Scotland, Proving [sic] That Their Clergy There Cannot With a Safe Conscience Swear the English Oath of Abjuration.

    Anonymous, Some Remarks on a Pamphlet Entitled "The Oath of Abjuration Displayed in its Sinful Nature and Tendency, etc.," Matt. 7:1 [Matthew 7:1]; Rom. 14.4 [Romans 14:4].

    Anonymous, Testimony of the Reformed Presbyterian Church of Ireland, 2 volumes.
    http://www.rpc.org/beliefs/testimony/index.htm

    Anonymous, A Vindication of the Ministers and Ruling Elders, in the Church of Scotland, who Have Refused the Oath of Abjuration. . . . In Two Parts.

    *Anonymous [Sundry Ministers of London], A Vindication of the Presbyteriall-government, and Ministry: Together, with an Exhortation, to all the ministers, elders, and people, within the bounds of the province of London, whether joyning with us, or separating from us. Published, by the ministers, and elders, met together in a provinciall assembly, Novemb. 2d. 1649. Wherein, amongst other things, these ensuing particulars are contained; 1. That there is a Church-government, by divine right. 2. That the magistrate, is not the fountain of Church-government. 3. That the presbyterial-government, is by divine right. 4. The inconveniencies of the congregationall-way. 5. That the ruling-elder is by divine right. 6. That it is the will of Jesus Christ, that all sorts of persons should give an account of their faith, to the minister, and elders, before admission to the Lords Supper; . . . 7. Directions to the elders, for the right managing of their office. 8. Directions to such as are admitted to the Lords Supper, . . . 9. Rules to preserve people, from the errours of these times. 10. That separation from our churches, is justly charged with schisme. 11. That ministers formerly ordained by bishops, need no new ordination. 12. The necessity and usefulness of catechizing. Licensed, entred, and printed according to order, 1649. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.

    Anonymous, Who are the Covenanters? 1900.

    Arrowsmith, John, The Covenant Avenging Sword Brandished . . . Matt. 10:34 [Matthew 10:34], (1643). Alternate title: THE COVENANT-AVENGING SWORD BANISHED . . . 1643. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
    "This famous sermon (of 32 pages), on Leviticus 26:25, I shall bring a sword upon you, that shall avenge the quarrel of my covenant, (by one of the more prominent men that was shortly thereafter called to the Westminster Assembly), was preached 'Before the Honorable (English -- RB), House of Commons, At Their Late Solemn Fast, January 25 (1643).' It demonstrates that it is the Scriptural duty of nations and their rulers to covenant with Christ and to seek God's glory in all things -- which is especially important in the case of civil leaders in their office as civil leaders. For, as Arrowsmith shows, if this is not done (with godly zeal), God's wrath (in the form of blindness to the truth, in a lack of fear of the judgment that is to come, in storms and wars and other calamities, etc.), will be poured out upon those nations which refuse to kiss the Son by obeying and covenanting with Him.
    "Be wise now therefore, O ye kings: be instructed, ye judges of the earth. Serve the LORD with fear, and rejoice with trembling. Kiss the Son, lest he be angry, and ye perish from the way, when his wrath is kindled but a little. Blessed are all they that put their trust in him. (Ps. 2:10-12 [Psalm 2:10-12]).
    "In this sermon Arrowsmith also summons the English parliament to new obedience to Christ. Some suggest that Arrowsmith may have been the main shaper of the Shorter Catechism. 'Cotton Mather says . . . "everything of Arrowsmith is admirable . . ." He was clearly respected as both a preacher and a scholar by the (Westminster -- RB), Assembly, which he repeatedly summoned to unity and diligence in its work'." (Barker, Puritan Profiles, p. 148) -- Publisher

    *Ashe, Simeon (d. 1662), Religious Covenanting Directed, and Covenant-keeping Perswaded: Presented, in a Sermon Preached Before the Right Honourable Thomas Adams Lord Major, and the Right Worshipfull the Sheriffs, and Aldermen his Brethren, and the Rest of the Common-Councel of the Famous City of London, January 14. 1645. Upon Which day the Solemne League and Covenant was Renewed by Them and Their Officers, With Prayer and Fasting, at Michael Basing-shaw, London, 1645.

    Assembly of the Covenanters' Union, First Report of the Annual Assembly of the Covenanters' Union, 1894.

    B.W., To the Faithfull and True-hearted Covenanters, VVhich are the Noble Philadelphians. A Diurnall, of the Desires and Indeavours of one That Earnestly Desires the Advancement of the Cause of Christ. B.W. of Darbie. Reade all or None, 1644.

    *Baillie, Robert (1599-1662), and David Laing (editor), Letters and Journals of Robert Baillie, 3 volumes, 1841 edition, ISBN: 0921148984 9780921148982. Christian classic. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #17.
    "Baillie was one of the Scottish delegates to the Westminster Assembly and these volumes cover the period from 1637 to 1662 -- some of the most momentous days in the history of the Reformed faith. These letters contain an intimate insider's look at these days of international religious drama, national covenants, and the writing of the greatest religious Confession ever given to men, the Westminster Confession of Faith (1646). A major source for 17th century Church history and a totally unique compilation -- peering into the very heart of Reformation!" -- Publisher
    Volume one only of above.
    "Contains Baillie's letters and journal entries covering the period from 1637 to 1641. The appendix includes "Original Letters and Papers, Chiefly Relating to Ecclesiastical Affairs in Scotland, 1633 to 1639."
    Volume two only of above.
    "Contains letters covering the period from 1642 to 1646. The appendix includes 'Original Letters and Papers, Chiefly Relating to Ecclesiastical Affairs in Scotland, 1639 to 1646.'
    Volume three only of above.
    "Contains letters covering the period from 1647 to 1662. The appendix includes 'Original Letters and Papers, Chiefly Relating to Ecclesiastical Affairs in Scotland, 1647 to 1661.' This volume also includes a glossary, an index of names and the memoir of the life and writings of Robert Baillie. Of special note are pages 525-557, which contain 'Notices Regarding the Metrical Version of the Psalms Received By the Church of Scotland,' where we see the historical validity of the Reformed practice of exclusive Psalmody, from the place occupied by the Psalter printed in Geneva in 1556, right up to the 'Psalter debates' that took place during Westminster Assembly." -- Publisher

    Baillie, Robert (1599-1662), A Review of the Seditious Pamphlet Lately Published [sic] in Holland by Dr. Bramhell, Pretended Bishop of London-derry, Entitled, His Faire Warning Against the Scots Discipline: in which his malicious and most lying reports, to the great scandall of that government, are fully and clearly refuted: as also the Solemne League and Covenant of the three nations justified and maintained, 1649. Alternate title: BAILLIE'S REVIEW OF BRAMHALL'S SEDITIOUS PAMPHLET . . . ALSO THE HOLY LEAGUE AND COVENANT OF THESE THREE NATIONS JUSTIFIED AND MAINTAINED. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.

    Baillie, Robert (1599-1662), The Unlawfulness and Danger of Limited Prelacy, or Perpetual Presidency in the Church, 1641. Alternate title: THE UNLAVVFULNESSE AND DANGER OF LIMITED EPISCOPACIE. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #23.
    "A defense of: Henderson, Alexander. THE VNLAVVFULNES AND DANGER OF LIMITED PRELACIE."

    Bannerman, D. Douglas (1842-1903, the son of James Bannerman [1807-1868]), The Scripture Doctrine of the Church Historically and Exegetically Considered, 1887, ISBN: 0801006562 9780801006562. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #24.

    *Bannerman, James (1807-1868), The Church of Christ: A Treatise on the Nature, Powers, Ordinances, Discipline, and Government of the Christian Church, 1869, 2 volumes. A Christian classic. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #24.
    "Two large volumes. A classic on the Church and worship! This is one of the most extensive studies of its kind ever compiled. Nothing compares to it on this subject. Regarding these gems, Iain Murray has stated, 'In our day, however greatly we need an evangelical revival, we need more than that. We need another Reformation, a movement which will go 'to the root of the mischief' and bring back the visible church to the pattern of God's Word in her government, ordinances and ministry. The republication of Bannerman is a step in that direction . . . For those who wish to study the doctrine of the Church in its several aspects as it was held by the majority of the Reformers, Puritans, Covenanters and leaders of 'The Third Reformation,' it will prove an invaluable textbook." -- Publisher

    Barnett, T. Ratcliffe (b. 1868), The Story of the Covenant: Fifty Years of Fighting Faith, 1928.

    Barrow, Greg, Classic Covenanter, Presbyterian, Puritan and Reformed Quotes from Various Authors Arranged by Topic. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
    "Great for cutting and pasting during online debates or for confirming classic Protestant and Presbyterian teaching!" -- Publisher
    Classic Covenanter, Presbyterian, Puritan, and Reformed Quotes From Various Authors -- Arranged by Topic
    http://www.swrb.com/covqsgb.htm

    Baynes, Paul, and William Ames, The Diocesans Tryall: Wherein all the Sinnewes of Doctor Dovvnhams Defence are Brought Into Three Heads, and Orderly Dissolved, 1621. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #8.

    Beattie, James, History of the Church of Scotland During the Commonwealth, 1842.

    Bell, John, Church of Scotland, General Assembly, An Abridgement and Alphabetical Index of the Acts of the General Assemblies, of the Church of Scotland From the Year 1638, to 1706, Inclusive of Both. By a Minister of the Gospel.

    Beza, Theodore (1519-1605), A Discourse of the True and Visible Marks of the Catholic Church, 2014, 1623, 1582. Alternate title: A DISCOURSE, OF THE TRUE AND VISIBLE MARKES OF THE CATHOLIQUE CHURCHE. Available from Covenanter Monthly Pamphlets. This is in a new printing with modern typeface.
    Besides being a discourse on the true church, it also exposes Romish heretical ideas about the true church.
    "Now the sum of all these things is this, that Christ is the true, perpetual, necessary: and to be short, the only mark of the Church: yea I say the true Christ that is, such a one, as he from the beginning has most perfectly (touching the matter and manner of salvation), revealed himself, both in the writings of the prophets and of the Apostles. For that saying stands sure: He that gathereth not with me, scattereth abroad: [Matthew 12:30], and that saying, that Christ is that corner stone of the foundation, upon whom the whole building riseth up: [1 Peter 2:7] And that only head, which ministereth unto his body, that is the true Catholic Church, all feeling and moving: To be short, he is the door [John 10:7], the way [John 14:6], the resurrection, and the life. [John 11:25]" -- Theodore Beza, pp. 36,37
    John Calvin (1509-1564), and Theodore Beza (1519-1605), were life-long friends. They met studying Greek together by fire-light when Calvin was still a law student. Theodore Beza was nine years old at the time. Beza became Calvin's protege and helper at Geneva. He then became Calvin's successor at Geneva.

    Black, John (1768-1849), The Everlasting Kingdom: A Discourse on the Mediatorial Dominion of Jesus Christ, 1848.

    Black, John (1768-1849), A Sermon on National Righteousness and Sin: Delivered in the First Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh, April 3, 1827, Before a Large Assembly Convened for the Purpose of Adopting Resolutions Against Duelling.

    Blake, William, William Maitland of Lethington, 1528-1573: A Study of the Policy of Moderation in the Scottish Reformation (Studies in British History, Vol. 17), ISBN: 0889464685 9780889464681.

    Bonar, Horatius (1808-1889), Catechisms of the Scottish Reformation, 1866.

    Boston, Thomas (1676-1732), Christ the Saviour of the World. A Sermon: Preached Immediately Before the Celebration of the Lord's Supper, at Ettrick, June 7th, 1724. By the Rev. Mr. Thomas Boston.

    Boston, Thomas (1676-1732), The Complete Works of the Reverend Thomas Boston, volumes 1-12. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #6.
    The Whole Works of the Late Reverend and Learned Mr. Thomas Boston, Minister of the Gospel at Etterick
    http://books.google.com/books?id=bgdKAAAAMAAJ&ie=ISO-8859-1&output=html

    *Boston, Thomas (1676-1732), The Marrow of Modern Divinity. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #27.
    "Jeremiah Burroughs states,' If thou wilt pursue this little book, thou shalt find great worth in it.' First printed in 1645, this controversial book was read in 1700 by Thomas Boston and had a profound influence on his ministry. Boston added copious notes to this edition, which was reprinted in 1718. His notes, which are often longer than the text, are an invaluable addition to this work. Its contents are largely taken from the works of the Reformers and English Puritans. Three members of the Westminster Assembly wrote recommendations to the Marrow. Part one of the book, 'The Covenant of Grace and the Covenant of Works,' is definitely one of the best explanations of covenant theology in the English language. Part two is 'An Exposition of the Ten Commandments.' 'The marrow of the second bone (part),' said Caryl, 'is like that of the first, sweet and good. The commandments of God are marrow to the saints, as well as the promises; and they shall never taste the marrow of the promise who distaste the commandments. This little treatise breaketh the bone, the hard part of commandments, by plain exposition, so that all, even babes in Christ, yea, such as are yet out of Christ, may suck out and feed upon the marrow by profitable meditation.' This section on the commandments is practical and powerful -- guarding against the antinomian heresy. This whole book (of 400 pages), is in beautiful condition and this edition contains the appendix by John Brown of Haddington." -- Publisher

    Brinsley, John, The Saints Solemn Covenant With Their God: As it was Opened in a Sermon Preached at Beccles in the Countie of Suffolk, at the Taking of the National Covenant There, by the Ministers and Other Officers of That Division. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.

    Bromwell, John, A Fair Warning to Take Heed of the Scottish Discipline as Being of all Others Most Injurious to the Civil Magistrate, Most Oppressive to the Subject, Most Pernicious to Both, Luke 9:35; Hosea 2:7, 1649.
    Apparently a contrarian position.

    Brown, J. Wood, The Covenanters of the Merse: Their History and Sufferings, as Found in the Records of That Time, 1893.

    Brown, John (of Haddington, 1722-1787), A Compendious History of the British Churches in England, Scotland, Ireland, and America: Giving an Account of the Most Material Transactions Since the Introduction of Christianity to the Present Time: With an Introductory Sketch of the History of the Waldenses. By John Brown, 2 vols. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #7.

    Brown, John (of Haddington, 1722-1787), A Compendious History of the Church of England, and of the Protestant Churches in Ireland and America . . . With an Introductory Sketch of the History of the Waldenses. By John Brown, minister of the gospel in Haddington, 8 volumes. Alternate title: A COMPENDIOUS HISTORY OF THE BRITISH CHURCHES IN ENGLAND, SCOTLAND, IRELAND, AND AMERICA.

    Brown, John (of Haddington, 1722-1787), A Compendious History of the Church of Scotland, 1784. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. This would appear to be an excerpt from A COMPENDIOUS HISTORY OF THE BRITISH CHURCHES IN ENGLAND, SCOTLAND, IRELAND, AND AMERICA. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #7.

    Brown, John (of Haddington, 1722-1787), and William Brown, Memoir and Select Remains of the Rev. John Brown, Minister of the Gospel, Haddington. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #7.

    Brown, John (of Wamphray, 1610-1679), An Apologetical Relation of the Particular Sufferings of the Faithful Ministers and Professors of the Church of Scotland Since 1660, Wherein Several Questions, Useful for the Time, Are Discussed: The king's prerogative over parliaments and people soberly inquired into; the lawfulness of defensive war cleared; the supreme magistrate's power in church matters examined; Mr. Stillingfleet's notion concerning the divine right or forms of church government considered; the author of "The seasonable case" answered; other particulars, such as the hearing of the curates appearing before the high commission court, etc., canvassed . . . , etc., Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #8.

    *Brown, John (of Wamphray, 1610-1679), Corporate Sanctification: Holding Fast the Attainments of Reformation. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #1. Available in OBSERVATIONS ON THE PUBLIC COVENANTS BETWIXT GOD AND THE CHURCH: A DISCOURSE.
    "An overview of the Covenanter doctrine of reformation attainments by one of the great Covenanter theologians. Helpful in dispelling false charges of Anabaptism and perfectionism laid at the feet of faithful Covenanters by schismatics. John Brown was one of Samuel Rutherford's best students." -- Publisher
    http://www.swrb.com/newslett/actualnls/attain.htm

    Brown, S.J., Scotland in the Age of Disruption, 1993, ISBN: 0748604332 9780748604333.

    Brown, S.J., Thomas Chalmers and the Godly Commonwealth in Scotland, 1982, ISBN: 0192131141 9780192131140.

    Brown, Thomas (1811-1893), Annals of the Disruption, 1893. Includes two volumes: FORMATION OF THE FREE CHURCH OF SCOTLAND and CHURCH AND STATE: A NARRATIVE OF THE STRUGGLE FOR INDEPENDENCE FROM 1560 TO 1843. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
    "ANNUALS OF THE DISRUPTION chronicles the formation of the Free Church of Scotland, with extracts from the narratives of ministers who left the Scottish establishment in 1843. This battle over unlawful civil encroachments upon the church can be instructive today as the same principles still apply. Church government and education (re: home schools and private Christian schools), are most affected in our day by tyrannical civil 'authorities'." -- Publisher

    Buchanan, George, Buchanan's History of Scotland. In Twenty books. . . . The Third Edition, Revised and Corrected From the Latin Original. In two Volumes. Adorned With Curious Cuts Engraven From the Original Paintings, by Mr. White, Mr. Vertue, & c. Alternate title: RERUM SCOTICARUM HISTORIA.

    Buchanan, George, George Buchanan: Glasgow Quartercentenary Studies, 1906.

    Buchanan, George, Roger A. Mason, and Martin S. Smith, A Dialogue on the law of Kingship Among the Scots: A Critical Edition and Translation of George Buchanan's De jure regni apud Scotos dialogus, ISBN: 1859284086 9781859284087. Alternate title: DE JURE REGNI APUD SCOTOS DIALOGUS and A DISCOURSE CONCERNING THE DUE PRIVILEGE OF GOVERNMENT IN THE KINGDOM OF SCOTLAND and A DIALOGUE CONCERNING THE DUE PRIVILEGE OF GOVERNMENT IN THE KINGDOM OF SCOTLAND 1680. Available (A DIALOGUE CONCERNING THE DUE PRIVILEGE OF GOVERNMENT IN THE KINGDOM OF SCOTLAND 1680), on the Puritan Hard Drive.
    "A detection of the actions of Mary queen of Scots: concerning the murder of her husband, and her conspiracy, adultery, and pretended marriage with Earl Bothwel: and a defense of the true lords, maintainers of the king's majesty's action and authority." -- Publisher

    Buchanan, Robert, The Ten Years' Conflict: Being the History of the Disruption of the Church of Scotland, 1849.

    Buckroyd, Julia, Church and State in Scotland, 1660-1681 (1980), ISBN: 0859760421 9780859760423.

    Buckroyd, Julia, The Life of James Sharp, Archbishop of St. Andrews, 1618-1679: A Political Biography, 1987. ISBN: 0859761843 9780859761840.

    *Burges, Cornelius (1589?-1665), The First Sermon Preached to the Honorable House of Commons now Assembled in Parliament at Their Public Fast, Nov. 17, 1640. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #29.
    "A beautifully clear facsimile copy of this amazing sermon (published by order of the British House of Commons in 1641), exhorting this Parliament to 'stand to the covenant' of God; by, 'endeavouring of a further Sanction of, and stronger Guard about our true Palladium, the true Religion, already established among us; in the perfecting of the Reformation of it; in the erecting, maintaining, protecting, and encouraging of an able, godly, faithful, zealous, profitable, Preaching Ministry, in every Parish Church and Chapel throughout England and Wales; in interceding to the Kings sacred Majesty for the setting up of a Faithful, Judicious, and Zealous Magistracy, where yet the same is wanting, to be ever at hand to back such a Ministry: without either of which, not only the power of Godliness will sooner degenerate into formality, and zeal into lukewarmness; but Popery, Arminianism, Socinianism, Profaneness, Apostasy, and Atheism itself will more and more crowd in upon us, and prevail against us, do You all You can be all other means.' Points out that where a godly ministry and magistracy are lacking, society degenerates into a godless mob, headed by one of the above named heresies -- as we have seen in our day. Presses national covenant renewal, from Jer. 50:5 [Jeremiah 50:5], and explains from scripture how and why this should take place. Cites many biblical examples of the great Scriptural blessing that has followed previous national covenanting; while making practical application to the situation of the day. This sermon foreshadows chapter 23, of the celebrated Westminster Confession of Faith [1646], on 'the Civil Magistrate,' and gives much insight into this watershed period of Christian political development. It is highly recommended for anyone even remotely interested in seeing their nation prosper politically and ecclesiastically. Furthermore, it will be a great help for anyone seeking to formulate a biblical doctrine explaining the four way relationship between: loving God with all your heart, soul, strength and mind; Jesus Christ as mediator; the everlasting covenant (and covenanting); and the state, as set forth in Scripture. A very rare item. A Covenanter's delight! 70 pages." -- Publisher

    Burgess, Anthony, (d. 1664), and Samuel Clarke (1599-1682), Golden Apples, or Seaonable and Serious Counsel From the Sanctuary to the Rulers of the Earth: Held Forth in the Resolution of Sundry Questions and Cases of Conscience, 1659.

    *Burgess, Anthony (d. 1664), The Reformation of the Church, To be Endeavoured More Than That of the Commonwealth, 1645, 28 pages. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
    "A 'Sermon preached before the Right Honourable House of Lords at the publicke Fast, August 27, 1645,' (notes the cover), during the days of the sitting of the Westminster Assembly. Can you image these words (which are just a small sample from the preface to the godly exhortation contained in this sermon), directed, by request of the civil magistrate, to the leaders of your nation? Burgess writes, 'It was my endeavour in this Sermon to excite your Lordships to a speedy and exact Reformation of the Church from all the corruptions that have defiled her, and herein to attend unto God's Word, as the only starre that will conduct unto Christ. None are too great to undertake so good a work. Gregory said of David dancing before the Ark, Magis miror Davidum saltantem, quam pugnantem, David is to be more admired in his religious worship of God, than in his courageous conquest and slaughter of the Philistines, or other enemies. Hence, Jer. 9:23,24 [Jeremiah 9:23,24]. where glory in wisdome, riches and might is forbidden, there is a kinde of an holy pride allowed in the knowledge of the Lord. Let Heathens glory, that they are saluted by the Common-wealth, Patres Pariae; but let those Christians, whom God honoureth with dignity and place, delight to be nursing Fathers to the Church, by speaking comfortably unto those who teach the good knowledge of God; and by commanding the Levites to carry all the filthiness out of the Temple. Which that your Lordships may faithfully and zealously doe, is the prayer of Your Lordships humble Servant, Anthony Burgesse'." -- Publisher

    *Burgess, Anthony (d. 1664?), Vindiciae Legis: or, A Vindication of the Moral Law and the Covenants, From the Errors of Papists, Arminians, Socinians, and More Especially, Antinomians (1646). Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
    " 'A nonconformist clergyman,' Burgess 'was a member of the [Westminster] Assembly of Divines. Ejected at the Restoration . . . his works are much valued and have become very scarce.' (Darling, Cyclopedia Bibliographica, p. 439). This book contains 30 lectures preached at London 'against the antinomian errors of the times.' It is the second edition corrected and augmented. Burgess says that he wrote to 'maintain the dignitie and use of the Morall Law against late errours about it.' Taking on all the errorists listed in the subtitle Burgess also notes that he has 'endeavoured to give the Law its due, and the Gospel its due, remembering that of Luther . . . He that knoweth how to distinguish between Law and Gospel, let him give thanks to God, and know he is a Divine' [i.e. a scholar of Scripture -- RB].
    "An exceedingly rare item that sells for over $300 a copy on the rare book market. This book should be read by everyone in the Protestant Reformed church (or anyone who must deal with them), as it demolishes their (i.e. Protestant Reformed), errors concerning covenants -- especially in regard to their denial (and disregard for the biblical, 'Westminster' view), of the covenant of works. Some of its 62 chapter heads include: 'What a man cannot do by the power of nature;' 'Whether there are any antecedaneous works upon the heart before grace;' 'What does this Image [of God in man -- RB], consist;' 'Whether God did enter into a covenant with Adam;' 'How God can be said to covenant, or enter into a promise with man;' What Law this delivered in Mount Sinai is, and what kind of laws there are, and why it's called the Moral Law;' Whether this Law repeated by Moses, be the same with the law of nature implanted in us;' 'Why God gave the Moral Law;' Whether the Law be an instrument of sanctification;' 'Whether the Law be a covenant of grace;' Wherein the Law and Gospel do oppose or differ from each other; under which is handled the false differences between the Law and Gospel made by Anabaptists, Papists, and Antinomians;' 'Whether the Law command faith;' 'How Christ is the end of the Law.' Indexed." -- Publisher

    Calamy, Edmund (1671-1732), The Autobiography of Richard Baxter, ISBN: 0874714087 9780874714067.
    "Abridged with an introduction and notes by J.M. Lloyd Thomas. A clear, easy-to-read account of the life of one of the great nonconformists of the 17th century, replete with accounts of political and ecclesiastical intrigue and all that militates against the development of piety and the work of the Lord." -- Cyril J. Barber

    Calamy, Edmund (1671-1732), A Continuation of the Account of the Ministers, Lecturers, Masters and Fellows of Colleges, and Schoolmasters, who Were Ejected and Silenced After the Restoration in 1660, by or Before the Act for Uniformity. To which is added, the church and dissenters compar'd as to persecution, in some remarks on Dr. Walker's Attempt to recover the names and sufferings of the clergy that were sequestred, &c., between 1640 and 1660. And also Some free remarks on the twenty-eight chapter of Dr. Bennet's Essay on the 39 articles of religion . . . .

    Calamy, Edmund (1671-1732), A Defence of Moderate Non-Conformity. In Answer to the Reflections of Mr. Ollyffe and Mr. Hoadly, on the Tenth Chapter of the Abridgment of the Life of the Reverend Mr. Rich. Baxter.

    Calamy, Edmund (1600-1666), England's Antidote Against the Plague of Civil War: Presented in a Sermon Before the Honorable House of Commons, on Their Late Extraordinary Solemne Fast, October 22. 1644, Luke 13:4,5.

    Calamy, Edmund (1600-1666), The Great Danger of Covenant-refusing, and Covenant-breaking. Alternate title: THE GREAT DANGER OF COVENANT-REFUSING, AND COVENANT-BREAKING: PRESENTED IN A SERMON PREACHED BEFORE THE RIGHT HONORABLE THOMAS ADAMS, LORD MAYOR, AND THE RIGHT WORSHIPFULL THE SHERIFFES, AND THE ALDERMEN HIS BRETHREN, AND THE REST OF THE COMMON-COUNCELL OF THE FAMOUS CITY OF LONDON, JAN. 14, 1645. UPON WHICH DAY THE SOLEMNE LEAGUE AND COVENANT WAS RENUED BY THEM. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
    Vow, and pay unto the Lord your God. (Psalm 76:11a)
    When thou vowest a vow unto God, defer not to pay it: for he hath no pleasure in fools; pay that which thou hast vowed.
    Better it is that thou shouldest not vow, than that thou shouldest vow and not pay.
    (Ecclesiastes 5:4,5)
    http://www.truecovenanter.com/covenants/calamy_sermon_danger_of_covenant_refusing_and_breaking.html

    Calamy, Edmund (1600-1666), An Indictment Against England Becavse of her Selfe-mvrdering Divisions: Together With an Exhortation to an England-preserving Unity and Concord: Presented in a sermon preached before the . . . House of Lords in the abby Church at Westminster, at the late solemne fast, Matt. 12:25 [Matthew 12:25], December 25. 1644. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.

    Calamy, Edmund (1671-1732), The Ministry of the Dissenters Vindicated: in an Ordination Sermon Preach'd at Ailsbury, in the County of Bucks; on June 11. 1724.

    Calamy, Edmund (1600-1666), Thomas Manton (1620-1677), Joseph Caryl (1602-1673), James Nalton (1600-1662), Thomas Lye (1621-1684), Ashe, Simeon (d. 1662), A Compleat Collection of Farewel Sermons Preached by Mr. Calamy, Dr. Manton, Mr. Caryl . . . [et al.]; Together With Mr. Ash his Funeral Sermon, Mr. Nalton's Funeral Sermon, Mr. Lye's Rehearsal . . . With Their Several Prayers. Alternate title: A COMPLEAT COLLECTION OF FAREWEL SERMONS, PREACHED BY MR. CALAMY, DR. MANTON, MR. CARYL, MR. CASE, MR. JENKINS, MR. BAXTER, DR. JACOMB, DR. BATES, MR. WATSON, MR. LYE, MR. MEAD, DR. SEAMAN, MR. VENNING, MR. BROOKS, MR. COLLINGS, MR. NEWCOMEN, MR. BEERMAN, MR. CRADACOTT, MR. SCLATER, MR. PLEDGER, MR. BULL, MR. LAMB, MR. WADSWORTH, MR. COOPER, MR. G.N, MR. GASPINE, MR. EVANK, MR. GEO. THORN, TOGETHER, WITH MR. ASH HIS FUN. SERM, MR. NALTON'S FUN. SERM, MR. LYE'S REHEARSAL AT THE CONCLUSION OF THE LAST MORNING EXERCISE, AT ALHALLOWES LOMBARD-STREET, MR. CALAMY'S SERMON, PREACHED AT ALDERMANBURY, DECEMBER 28TH LAST, AND MR. WATSON'S SERMON AGAINST POPERY, WITH THEIR SEVERAL PRAYERS. Contains 42 sermons. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
    See also Lazarus Seaman, THE SECOND AND LAST COLLECTION OF THE LATE LONDON MINISTERS FAREWEL SERMONS.

    *Calamy, Edmund (1671-1732), and Samuel Palmer (editor), The Nonconformist's Memorial, 1802 3 vols., ISBN: 0781206243. This seems to be the preferred edition. E-text available OCLC: 220202826. A Christian classic. See also, Benjamin Brook, LIVES OF THE PURITANS.
    "Edmund Calamy (1678-1732), a dissenting minister in London and a historian, was the son and grandson of puritan ministers inside the Church of England. Both of them, along with hundreds of others, were expelled from their church livings for their refusal to submit to the 1662 Act of Uniformity. This event, the so-called 'Great Ejection', was a crucial moment in the formation of religious dissent in England. This book, first published in 1775, is an extensively-revised version, by another dissenting minister Samuel Palmer, of materials originally collated and published by Edmund Calamy, commemorating the lives and works of these ejected ministers.
    "Editing the autobiography of one of the most eminent of these ejected ministers, Richard Baxter, Calamy included a long chapter listing the ejected ministers and such biographical data as he could find. This is the famous chapter 9 of AN ABRIDGMENT OF MR BAXTER'S HISTORY OF HIS LIFE AND TIMES (1702). This chapter became a whole volume of a second edition of the ABRIDGEMENT published in 1713. And in 1727 Calamy produced a further two volumes of material under the title A CONTINUATION OF THE ACCOUNT OF THE MINISTERS, LECTURERS, MASTERS AND FELLOWS OF COLLEGES, AND SCHOOLMASTERS WHO WERE EJECTED AND SILENCED AFTER THE RESTORATION OF 1660 . . . "Samuel Palmer attempted to integrate this material into a more readable form, making extensive revisions and additions. He certainly succeeded in producing something more accessible to eighteenth-century readers and there were several reprints of the book and a second edition in 1802-3. However readability was sometimes at the cost of accuracy and of a reduction of the scholarly value of Calamy's material.
    "Nevertheless THE NONCONFORMIST'S MEMORIAL was an important work of collective memory by eighteenth-century dissenters." -- Publisher
    Calamy, Edmund (1671-1732), The Nonconformist's Memorial: Being an Account of the Ministers, who Were Ejected or Silenced . . . (1775), volume 1 of 2
    http://archive.org/details/nonconformistsm00calagoog
    Calamy, Edmund (1671-1732), The Nonconformist's Memorial: Being an Account of the Ministers, who Were Ejected or Silenced . . . (1775), volume 2 of 2
    http://archive.org/details/nonconformistsme02cala
    The Nonconformist's Memorial: Being an Account of the Lives, Sufferings, and Printed Works, of the Two Thousand Ministers Ejected from the Church of England, Chiefly by the Act of Uniformity, Aug. 24, 1666. . . .
    http://books.google.com/books?id=b08UwRUmWL0C&ie=ISO-8859-1&output=html

    *Calderwood, David (1600-1666), The History of the Kirk of Scotland, 8 volumes. A Christian classic. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #11.
    " 'The extensive learning and eminent talents of the Rev. David Calderwood, his matured experience in ecclesiastical affairs, and especially in those of his native country, the persecutions he had endured for his beloved Church, and the numerous works he had written in its defense, all qualified him, in the happiest manner, for becoming a Historian of the Kirk of Scotland. Above all, when the narrative was to be one of struggle and suffering, in which the principalities and powers of the earth, as well as those of darkness, were the antagonists, the record of such a conflict fell most aptly into the hands of a man whom a monarch had in vain attempted to brow-beat, and a whole hierarchy to silence. His own heart also appears to have affectionately inclined towards this his most congenial occupation, so that, after his return from exile, he spent many years in collecting and arranging the materials necessary for such an important task. At last, when he had reached his seventy-third year, the General Assembly, for the purpose of enabling him to perfect his work, granted him an annual pension of 800 pounds Scots. Calderwood died only two years afterwards; but he lived to accomplish his purpose of writing the History of our National Church from the commencement of the Reformation to the close of the reign of James the Sixth, in two, if not three successive and copious revisals' (Preface to volume one, pp. v-vi). More on the prominent role Calderwood played in the church of his day is supplied by Johnston, TREASURY OF THE SCOTTISH COVENANT, p. 47, when he writes that 'the Second Book of Discipline was sworn to in the National Covenant in 1581, and revised by the Assembly of 1638. The most important parts of the book were legalized in 1592, and again in 1690. Calderwood, the historian, edited 'The First and Second Book of Discipline,' printed in 1621.' Furthermore, the DICTIONARY OF SCOTTISH CHURCH HISTORY AND THEOLOGY (p. 118), tells us that Calderwood was 'excluded from the church courts when he opposed Bishop James Law of Orkney's (FES VII, 322), substitution of royal supporters in place of the Presbytery's duly elected representatives to the General Assembly. But when King James VI visited Scotland in 1617, Calderwood and 54 other ministers meeting in Edinburgh wrote a protest against the King's intention that the monarch and men of his preference should appoint forms of worship and discipline in the Church. Calderwood was required to appear with Archibald Simson before the King at St. Andrews, where from his knees he boldly opposed the King's will and asserted the freedom of the General Assembly to control the Church's ceremonies and government (emphasis added, and some today say these are points of little or no consequence -- how different from our Reformed forefathers -- RB). Calderwood was deprived of his charge, imprisoned and banished. In 1619 he went to Holland, whence he issued anonymously his monumental critique of English episcopacy, The Altar of Damascus (n.p., 1621), greatly enlarged in Latin . . . Calderwood's writings were erudite and widely persuasive, preparing the way for the restoration of Presbyterian practice at the 'Second Reformation' . . . With Alexander Henderson and David Dickson he was appointed by the General Assembly of 1643 to draft a directory for public worship, to fill a need for guidelines after the episcopal conventions had been removed (in keeping with the Solemn League and Covenant -- RB).' The same article, commenting on this eight volume history, relates, 'it is a major source for the history of the Church of Scotland from the Reformation until 1625.' This massive set (of over 6000 pages), was printed between 1842 and 1849. It contains a 171 page index and Thomson's 'Life of David Calderwood. The contents are listed and dealt with chronologically by year; beginning in the preamble with the descent of the Scots from the ancient Gauls, but formally covering the period (focusing to the church), from 1514 to 1625. Documents and information available no where else (that we know of), are also included in this set. Must reading for researchers and those interested in church history!" -- Publisher
    The History of the Kirk of Scotland (1842), David Calderwood, Volume: 1 of 8 found at the same site
    http://archive.org/details/historykirkscot05caldgoog

    *Calderwood, David (1600-1666), The Pastor and the Prelate or Reformation and Conformity Shortly Compared, 1844. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. (PB #4, ACL, DVD One, CD #3)
    "This 17th century work refutes prelacy. Calderwood, bound by solemn oath to defend the doctrine and discipline of Biblical Presbyterian government and worship, and to oppose the hierarchy, along with all rites and ceremonies added to the worship of God, does a masterful job here. He uses the Word of God and the proceedings of the ancient and Reformation churches to make his points. He deals with controversies over things 'indifferent,' people's souls, state and society, etc. -- as they are affected by these two systems of government. He points out the far reaching consequences of the implementation of various systems of church government and worship, showing how these specific ideas are eventually mirrored in the culture in general. Summarizing, he notes the classic saying concerning these matters and their consequences in the civil realm, 'no ceremony no bishop, no bishop no king,' and in the ecclesiastical arena, 'no ceremony no prelate, no prelate no pope'." -- Publisher

    *Calvin, John (1509-1564), Calvin's Commentary on Isaiah, 4 books, published in 2 volumes in CALVIN'S COMMENTARIES (vols. 7, 8). Spine title: CALVIN'S COMMENTARIES, VOLUME VII: ISAIAH 1-32; CALVIN'S COMMENTARIES, VOLUME VIII: ISAIAH 33-66. A Christian classic.
    Several factors combine to make CALVIN'S COMMENTARY ON ISAIAH particularly significant.

    C. Gregg Singer states, in the Mt. Olive Tape Library series of lectures:
    I have a study ready for public -- well, not ready for publication, but hopefully someday, on Calvin's use of Augustine [apparently never published -- compiler]. There are at least 400 references to Augustine in John Calvin. Anybody who says that Calvin got his theology of the top of his head knows no Calvin. Calvin knew Augustine probably better than anybody else, including Luther. Calvin went back to all the Early Western Fathers. I would say that next to Augustine, his theology is based upon Bernard of Clairvaux and Anselm, and he had a higher respect for Saint Thomas Aquinas than many people are willing to admit. But he is in the Western theological tradition.
    Charles Hodge, in his SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY of three volumes, very often refers to Calvinism as Augustinianism, and you can see why. . . . [Charles Hodge], declares that you might as well call Calvinism revived and revitalized Augustinianism.
    Calvin's work is in four books, with a Scripture Index and a General Index. The Baker publication prints the four books in two volumes.
    Calvin, Jean [John, ] (1509-1564), Commentary on the Book of the Prophet Isaiah (1850), vol. 1 of 4.
    http://archive.org/details/commentaryonboo01calv
    Calvin, Commentary on the Book of the Prophet Isaiah (1850), vol. 2 of 4.
    http://archive.org/details/9thcommentaryonbo02calv
    Calvin, Commentary on the Book of the Prophet Isaiah (1850), vol. 3 of 4.
    http://archive.org/details/commentaryonbook03calv
    Calvin, Commentary on the Book of the Prophet Isaiah (1850), vol. 4 of 4.
    http://archive.org/details/commentaryonboo04calv
    Commentary on Isaiah -- Volume 1, John Calvin
    http://www.ccel.org/ccel/calvin/calcom13.html

    Calvin, John (1509-1564), Epistle Dedicatory [to Calvin's Commentary on Hebrews -- compiler], by John Calvin, to the Most Mighty and Most Serene Prince, Sigismund Augustus, by the Grace of God, the King of Poland, Great Duke of Lithuania, Russia, Prussia, and Lord and Heir of Muscovy, etc.
    "Your kingdom is extensive and renowned, and abounds in many excellencies, but its happiness will then only be solid, when it adopts Christ as its chief ruler and governor, so that it may be defended by his safeguard and protection; for to submit your sceptre to him, is not inconsistent with that elevation in which you are placed; but it would be far more glorious than all the triumphs of the world. . . ."
    http://www.biblestudyguide.org/comment/calvin/comm_vol44/htm/v.htm

    *Calvin, John (1509-1564), Epistle to the Faithful Showing That Christ is the end of the law. Alternate title: CHRIST IS THE END OF THE LAW; CALVIN'S PREFACE TO OLIVETAN'S NEW TESTAMENT; PREFACE TO THE GENEVA BIBLE OF 1550; or, informally, CALVIN ON THE GOSPEL. (Not to be confused with Calvin's "The Argument on the Gospel of Jesus Christ According to Matthew, Mark, and Luke," in the front matter of CALVIN'S COMMENTARIES: MATTHEW, MARK AND LUKE [volume 16 of the Baker edition], which is [THE ARGUMENT], also sometimes referred to as CALVIN ON THE GOSPEL).
    Calvin wrote "Christ is the end of the law," in 1534, "about the year of his conversion. . . . It is his first statement of faith as a Protestant, and an eloquent defense of it." -- Joseph Haroutunian
    Therefore, it is sometimes thought of as Calvin's testimony.
    Available in Desideius Erasmus, Robert Olivetan, and John Calvin (reviser and preface), OLIVETAN'S NEW TESTAMENT.
    "The New Testament in the Latin of Erasmus' version, and in the French of Olivetan, revised by Calvin."
    Also available in English and somewhat abridged in Jean Calvin (1509-1564), and T. Weedon (translator), Christ the end of the law: Being the Preface to the Geneva Bible of 1550.
    Calvin (1509-1564), Jean, and T. Weedon (translator), Christ the End of the Law: Being the Preface to the Geneva Bible of 1550 (1850)
    https://archive.org/details/christendlawbei00calvgoog
    Also available in another English translation in John Calvin (1509-1564), and Joseph Haroutunian (editor, translator), CALVIN: COMMENTARIES. This is a single volume in the Library of Christian Classics Series (Volume 23). It is composed of "Extracts from Calvin's commentaries topically arranged."
    "The present text, from the Opera, C. R. 9, pp. 791 f., contains additions Calvin made after 1534."
    John Calvin (1509-1564), and Joseph Haroutunian (translator), Epistle to the Faithful Showing that Christ is the end of the law
    http://books.google.com/books?id=NJ7UJGX8otkC&pg=PA58&dq=calvin+preface+Pierre+Robert+Oliv%C3%A9tan%E2%80%99s+French+translation+of+the+New+Testament#v=onepage&q=calvin%20preface%20Pierre%20Robert%20Oliv%C3%A9tan%E2%80%99s%20French%20translation%20of%20the%20New%20Testament&f=false

    Calvin, John (1509-1564), On God and Political Duty (1956)
    http://archive.org/details/ongodpoliticaldu00calv

    Calvin, John (1509-1564), The Unity of the Reformed Churches. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #27.

    Cameron, Richard (1648-1680), The Calvinistic Covenanter at Perfect Peace Amid Trials and Persecution. Available (MP3) on the Puritan Hard Drive.

    *Cameron, Richard (1648-1680), God Defends His Covenanted Remnant. Available (MP3) on the Puritan Hard Drive.
    "Cameron, the 'lion of the Covenant,' had to travel to Holland to receive ordination at the hands of two of Samuel Rutherford's former students, McWard and Brown of Wamphray (who were earlier exiled to the Netherlands for faithfulness to Christ's cause). Cameron could not be ordained in Scotland due to the fact that all the other 'presbyterian' ministers remaining in Scotland had defected from the covenanted cause. But Cameron (as Elijah and others before him), persevered, as the church is often brought to such extremities concerning her public testimony. Holding to the attainments won at Westminster and in the Solemn League and Covenant, Cameron refused to yield an inch of the blood bought ground he occupied. He was later joined by a second minister, Donald Cargill, and both were eventually martyred for their unwillingness to 'sell' even the least of the church's covenanted attainments (Prov. 23:23 [Proverbs 23:23]). He was said to be a powerful preacher and this sermon gives us a glimpse of what it must have been like to hear him. It covers numerous topics but focuses on Christ's victory in His church and God's anger against those who oppose his faithful servants. It contains a testimony against unlawful civil rulers and against Scotland's national apostasy (and covenant breaking). It also defends the use of defensive arms, the testimony of the Scottish martyrs during the killing times and some of the specific attainments of the Covenanted Reformation. Here again we get a taste of Covenanter field preaching in days of great persecution. This sermon is read (by Ruling Elder Lyndon Dohms), from the book SERMONS IN TIMES OF PERSECUTION IN SCOTLAND, BY SUFFERS FOR THE ROYAL PREROGATIVES OF JESUS CHRIST. Regarding the preacher, this arresting account of one of Welwood's last sermons is recounted in SERMONS IN TIMES OF PERSECUTION." -- Publisher

    Cameron, Richard (1648-1680), Good News to Scotland. Alternate title: GOOD NEWS TO SCOTLAND. A SERMON PREACHED IN THE PARISH OF CARLUKE, IN CLYDSDALE; UPON THE 8TH. DAY OF JULY 1680. BY . . . RICHARD CAMERON. TO WHICH IS ADDED, AN ACROSTICK UPON HIS NAME, 1741.
    "This sermon was among his last labours, being preached fourteen days before he suffered martyrdom at Airs-moss.
    "The scope of the sermon is, a scriptural prediction of the terrible judgments that are coming upon Zion's enemies, and the great and glorious deliverance that is coming to the church and people of God, in Britain and Ireland. A sermon, preached in the parish of Carluke, in Clydesdale, upon the 8th day of July, 1680, by that faithful minister and martyr of Jesus Christ, Mr. Richard Cameron. To which is added, an acrostic upon his name, by a true lover of his memory, and owner of the cause which he sealed with his blood." -- Publisher

    Cameronian, Was the Bishop's Death Murder? 1860. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #26.
    Was the Bishop's Death Murder? excerpted from The Reformed Presbyterian, Vol. XXIV, January, 1860, No. 1.
    http://www.truecovenanter.com/reformedpresbyterian/magazine/ref_presby_was_the_bishops_death_murder_1860.html

    Campbell, George Douglas, The Patronage Act of 1874: All That was Asked in 1843, Being a Reply to Mr. Taylor Innes.

    Cant, Andrew (1590?-1663), A Sermon Preached After the Renovation of the National Covenant, and Celebration of the Lord's Supper, at Glasgow, Anno. 1638. Alternate title: A SERMON PREACHED AT A GENERAL MEETING IN THE GRAY-FRIAR-CHURCH OF EDINBURGH, UPON THE 13 DAY OF JUNE, 1638, and THE NATIONAL COVENANT. SERMON AT GLASGOW (1638). Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
    "Preaching of Matthew 22:2-6, immediately after the renovation of the National Covenant and the administration of the Lord's Supper, Andrew Cant pointed out that ministers are servants, not lords over the flock of God:
    'We are servants and not lords. I see never a word in this text, nay, in all the scripture that the Master of the feast sent out lords to woo home his bride; He "sent out His servants," but not His lords. Read all the Bible from the beginning to the ending, you shall not find it. Daft men may dispute, and by respect may carry it away; but read all the Old and New Testament both, and let me see if ever this lord prelate, or that lord bishop, was sent to woo home his bride'." -- Andrew Cant, "The National Covenant. Sermon at Glasgow (1638)" in James Kerr (editor), The Covenants and the Covenanters: Covenants, Sermons, and Documents of the Covenanted Reformation, p. 94

    Carslaw, W.H., Exiles of the Covenant, 1908 edition. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #30.

    Carslaw, W.H., Six Martyrs of the Scottish Reformation, 1907. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #26.

    Carslaw, W.H., Three Heroes of the Covenant: The Life and Times of William Guthrie, Donald Cargill and James Renwick, Last of the Martyrs, 1902. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #26.

    *Carson, John L. (editor), David W. Hall (editor), To Glorify and Enjoy God: A Commemoration of the 350th Anniversary of the Westminster Assembly, ISBN: 0851516688 9780851516684.
    "Contents: Westminster Assembly commemorations / David W. Hall -- The context and work of the assembly / Samuel T. Logan, Jr -- The men and parties of the assembly / William S. Barker -- The preaching of the assembly / Robert M. Norris -- The Westminster Confession of Faith and Holy Scripture / Wayne R. Spear -- The Westminster Shorter Catechism / Douglas F. Kelly -- The Westminster Larger Catechism / W. Robert Godfrey -- The form of church government / John R. de Witt -- The directory for public worship / Iain H. Murray -- The sovereignty of God / James M. Boice -- The pre-eminence of Christ / Joel Nederhood -- The application of redemption / Eric J. Alexander -- The influence of Westminster / Jay E. Adams -- The unfinished Westminster Catechism / Wayne R. Spear -- Parliamentary background of the assembly / David W. Hall -- A bibliographical guide / David W. Hall."

    Caryl, Joseph (1602-1673), The Arraignment of Unbelief, as the Grand Cause of our Nationall Non-establishment . . . in a Sermon to the . . . House of Commons . . . 28th of May, 1645. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.

    Caryl, Joseph (1602-1673), Heaven and Earth Embracing; or, God and Man Approaching: Shewed in a Sermon Preached Before the . . . House of Commons . . . January 28, 1645 . . . Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.

    Chandos, John (compiler, annotation), In God's Name: Examples of Preaching in England From the Act of Supremacy to the Act of Uniformity, 1534-1662, 586 pages, ISBN: 0091059305 9780091059309.
    "Contents: Of Idolls and Images (c. 1540) | Roger Edgeworth -- Sermon of the Plough (1548). Inflation of Prices and Decay of Standard (1549). A Cure for Violence and Corruption (1549). Indiscipline and Superstition (1549) | Hugh Latimer -- The New Oppressors (1552) | Bernard Gilpin -- Sermon on Repentance (1553) | John Bradford -- The Sermon of the Boy Bishop (1558) | Richard Ramsay -- Of Washpots and Concubines. Of Whoredom and Uncleanness. Of Excess of Apparel. Of Contention and Brawling. Certain Homilies (c. 1559) -- On the Duties of a Prince (1559) | Edward Dering -- O Men, O Lilies (1567) | Thomas Drant -- The Effects of Example (1571) | John Bridges -- The Poor Man's Tears (1588) | Henry Smith -- A Warning Against Puritans (1588) | Richard Bancroft -- The Pathway to Perfection (1595) | Thomas Playfere -- Justification and Works (1591) | Richard Hooker -- An Unprepared Sermon on Malt (c. 1600) | John Dod (Apocryphal) -- On the Beheading of the Earl of Essex (1601) | William Barlow -- Preaching Charlatans (1606) | Samuel Collins -- The Good Witch Must Also Die (1608) | William Perkins -- A New Year's Gift to Virginia (1609) | William Crashaw -- Abraham's Suite to Sodom (1611) | Robert Milles -- The Rich Man (1612). The White Devil (1612) | Thomas Adams -- On Apostasy (1612) | John Dod -- Dining with the Devil (c. 1613) | Thomas Adams -- Tormenting Tophet: A View of Hell (1615) | Henry Greenwood -- The Meaning of Immanuel (1615). A Sermon of Thanksgiving for Deliverance from the Gunpowder Plot of 1605 (1616) | Lancelot Andrewes -- Of Duels (1618) | John Hales -- Righteous Mammon (1618) | John Hall -- Portents of Dissolution (1620) | Richard Harris -- The Natural Man is a Dead Man (c. 1620) | James Usher -- A Cold Coming (1622) | Lancelot Andrewes -- Woe to Drunkards (1622) | Samuel Ward -- The Nature of Damnation (1622) | John Donne -- The True Peace-maker (1624) | Joseph Hall -- London's Iniquity (1624) | William Proctor -- Christ, Dead or Alive? and the Recantation Sermon (1624) | Thomas Lushington -- The Chastisement of Love (1624). The Alienation of God (1625) | John Donne -- Great Britain's Solomon (1625) | John Williams -- The Dangers of Disobedience (1625). A Kingdom Melting (1625) | William Laud -- Of Faith (c. 1625). Of Love (c. 1625) | John Preston -- The Athenian Babbler (1626) | Humphrey Sydenham -- Burial as a Preparation for Life (1626) | John Donne -- The Divine Right of the King (1627) | Roger Manwaring -- The Waters of Marah and Meriah (1630). The Well-Tuned Cymball (1630) | Humphrey Sydenham -- The Danger of Desertion (1630) | Thomas Hooker -- Of Gluttony (c. 1635) | John Hales -- A Responsibility to Punish (1640) | Cornelius Burges -- The New Fort of True Honour Made Impregnable (1640) | Samuel Kem -- New England's Tears (1640) | William Hook -- The World, The Flesh, and the Devil (1641) | William Pierce -- Meroz Cursed (1641) | Stephen Marshall -- A Call for Blood (1641) | Samuel Fairclough -- A Wife Mistaken, or A Wife and No Wife (1641) | Thomas Grantham -- The Poisoner's Farewell (1641) | Peter Moor -- The Brownists Conventicle (1641) | Sectaries at Home -- Reformation and Desolation (1641) | Stephen Marshall -- Blessed are the Peacemakers (1642). A Sermon of Reformation (1643) | Thomas Fuller -- Some Small and Simple Reasons (1643) | Anon -- Blind Zeal and Deserved Confusion (1644) | William Chillingworth -- The Last Words of the Archbishop of Canterbury (1645) | William Laud -- England's Distemper (1645) | Christopher Love -- The Storming of Basing House (1645). God's Doings and Man's Duty (1646) | Hugh Peters -- Fear of Losing the old Light (1646) | Thomas Fuller -- Quintessence of the Gospel (1646) | Ralph Cudworth -- Flesh Expiring and the Spirit Inspiring (1648) | George Cokayne -- Comfort in Adversity (1648) | Henry Ferne -- God's Servant Oliver (1649) | Cromwell and Pseudo-Cromwell -- A Presbyterian Defiance from the Scaffold (1651) | Christopher Love -- Of Christian Prudence (1651). Lust for Revenge (1651). Of Growth in Sins (1651). The Righteous Cause Oppressed (1651). Flesh and Spirit (1653). The Glutton's Way (1653). Married Life (1653) | Jeremy Taylor -- Satan's Stratagems in the Heart (c. 1655) | Henry Hammond -- On the Death of Cromwell (1658) | George Lawrence -- The Redcoats Catechisme (1659). Good Counsel against Cold Weather (1659) | Anon -- Right Rejoicing (1660) | Richard Baxter -- David's Deliverance and Thanksgiving (1660) | William Sheldon -- A Sermon Upon His Majesty's Restoration (1660) | John Bramhall -- God's Message to His People (1660) | Gilbert Ironside. Responsibility: chosen and edited, with an introduction and annotations, by John Chandos."

    Cheyne, A.C., The Ten Years' Conflict and the Disruption: an Overview, 1993, ISBN: 0707307422 9780707307428.

    Church of Scotland, The Confessions of Faith, Catechisms, Directories, Form of Church-government, Discipline &c, of Public Authority in the Church of Scotland: Together With the Acts of Assembly Concerning the Doctrine, Worship, Discipline and Government of the Church of Scotland.

    Church of Scotland, Covenantal Lawsuits of the Church of Scotland
    http://www.forerunner.com/champion/X0003_2._Scottish_Covenant.html

    *Church of Scotland, General Assembly, 1638-1649, The Acts of the General Assemblies of the Church of Scotland, From the Year 1638 to the Year 1649 Inclusive, 1682. A Christian classic. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Also available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #11.
    "Exceedingly rare, these are the acts from what many consider the greatest general assembly gatherings since the days of the apostles. The work accomplished and ratified at these meetings has been called 'the most perfect model' of Presbyterial Church Government 'as yet attained.' Sitting during the momentous days of the Covenants (National and Solemn League), and the Westminster Assembly, this general assembly included the likes of Samuel Rutherford and George Gillespie. Judicially binding on covenanted Presbyterians (WCF 31:3), these Acts demonstrate how these godly leaders officially dealt with individual, family, ecclesiastical and civil Reformation (including national and international matters). Furthermore, it should not be forgotten that these rulings had major national and international ramifications in their day and that they still guide faithful Presbyterians at the close of the twentieth century (as terms of ministerial and Christian communion in the Reformed Presbyterian church). Moreover, they contain 'noble examples to be followed in testifying against all corruptions embodied in the constitutions of either churches or states.' (Reformed Presbytery, Act, Declaration and Testimony for the Whole of Our Covenanted Reformation, p. 216). Christ's Kingship has never since been so boldly and clearly proclaimed to the nations by a duly constituted general assembly -- neither has His rule and reign been upheld and actually embodied into the laws of a nation (civil and ecclesiastical), as it was during these days in Scotland. Much of this can be attributed to the work (humanly speaking), done by the ministers present while these Acts were debated and passed. Regarding doctrine, worship, government and discipline there are few books that will be as helpful -- especially to elders and those advanced in the faith. Additionally, if you want a glimpse at the heart of the Second Reformation this is one of the best places to look. It may also be considered 'the eye of the Puritan storm,' seeing that the Scottish Covenanters exerted such a godly influence among their English Presbyterian brothers (and the Westminster Assembly), during these days -- the two nations having covenanted with God (in the Solemn League and Covenant), for the international 'reformation and defense of religion . . . the peace and safety of the three kingdoms . . . the glory of God, and the advancement of the kingdom of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ, etc.' Over 500 pages and indexed for easy reference to all major topics." -- Publisher

    Church of Scotland, General Assembly, 1639, The Declinatour and Protestation of the Sometimes Pretended Bishops, Presented in the Face of the Last Assembly. Refuted and Found Futile, but Full of Insolent Reproaches, and Bold Assertions, 1639. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #10.
    "An exceedingly rare title marking the continuing rise, at critical juncture, of the covenanted Reformed Presbyterian church. Members of this General Assembly and signatories to this protestation include Samuel Rutherford, David Dickson, Robert Baillie and even James Sharp (who later apostasized to the camp of the Prelatical antichrist and persecuted [and murdered] the covenanters he once owned as brothers). This book refutes the charges of the prelates, while exposing their many errors (which included teaching Arminianism, Popery, conditional election, the power of free-will resisting effectual grace, that the Pope is not the Antichrist, that Rome is the true church [constitutionally], that worship is not regulated by the Word of God [the regulative principle], that the earlier reformers were deformers; and denying limited atonement, justification by faith alone, predestination, and a number of other revealed truths of Scripture.)" -- Publisher

    Church of Scotland, General Assembly, The Form of Process in the Judicatories of the Church of Scotland; With Relation to Scandals and Censures: To Which is Subjoined, Several Acts and Overtures of the General Assemblies . . . 1763.

    Clark, Gordon H. (1902-1985), John W. Robbins (1949-2008, editor), Historiography: Secular and Religious, ISBN: 0940931397 9780940931398 (Unicoi, TN: The Trinity Foundation, 1994).
    "The Christian doctrine of the sovereignty of God transformed the world's view of history, investing it with a meaning, importance, and grandeur that pagan historiography could never achieve. History is the unfolding of God's purpose and plan. Because God is rational, because God is sovereign, history is not a tale told by an idiot.
    "The Bible is not only the earliest history book, it is also the most reliable. Centuries before the famed historians of Greece and Rome, Moses had already written the definitive account of mankind's early history as revealed to him by God. The account was not exhaustive, for no history can be, but it contained all that God wished it to contain and nothing else. God, writing through Moses, has given us true history.
    "HISTORIOGRAPHY SECULAR AND RELIGIOUS will introduce the reader to the principles and problems of historiography and, in so doing, begin to suggest what an enormous debt we owe to the Bible in the study of history." -- Publisher

    *Clarkson, Andrew, Plain Reasons for Presbyterians Dissenting From the Revolution-Church in Scotland: As Also, Their Principles Concerning Civil Government, and the difference betwixt the reformation and revolution principles. Published for confirming the weak, and informing of the misinformed in those matters. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #6, #24, #26.
    "An exceedingly rare and important book now back in print after 265 years! The Contending Witness magazine (May, 1841), described PLAIN REASONS as 'the single best volume penned defending the principles of the Second Reformation.' It sets forth 'the grounds why Presbyterian Dissenters refused to hold communion with the revolution church and state.' (Reformed Presbytery, Act Declaration and Testimony for the Whole of Our Covenanted Reformation, p. 154). These principles still apply today and this still remains one of the best books explaining why and when an individual (our church), should separate itself from those (in church or state), who do not hold fast to all the attainments of our covenanted forefathers." -- Publisher
    Clarkson, Andrew, Plain Reasons for Presbyterians Dissenting from the Revolution Church of Scotland. Also, Their Principles Concerning Civil Government, and the Difference Betwixt the Reformation and Revolution Principles, 1731.
    http://www.swrb.com/newslett/actualnls/PlainTOC.htm
    Plain Reasons for Presbyterians Dissenting From the Revolution Church of Scotland (A Short Article Holding Forth the Principles of the Book by the Same Name) excerpted from The Contending Witness, Vol. I., No. 1, April, 1841.
    http://www.truecovenanter.com/reformedpresbyterian/magazine/contending_witness_plain_reasons_of_dissent.html

    Collins, G.N.M. (George Norman Macleod Collins), The Heritage of our Fathers: The Free Church of Scotland: Her Origin and Testimony, 1974.
    The Free Church of Scotland: Her Origin and Testimony
    http://www.freechurch.org/heritage.html

    Copeland, E. Clark, The Church a Covenant Community as Seen in the Jerusalem Council . . . , 1967.

    Couper, William James, Records of Scottish Church History Society 5 (1935), 227-37, 6 (1938), 68-79, 183-92, 299-304, The Literature of the Reformed Presbyterian Church, ISSN: 0264-5572.

    Couper, W.J., The Reformed Presbyterian Church in Scotland: Its Congregations, Ministers and Students, 1925. Also available in:
    Records of Scottish Church History Society 2 (1925), 45-6, 116-17, "The Reformed Presbyterian Church in Scotland," ISSN: 0264-5572.

    Couper, W.J., Richard Owen Roberts, et al., Scotland saw His Glory: A History of Revivals in Scotland, ISBN: 0926474162 9780926474161.
    "Revivals are sometimes classed among movements that are due to ignorance, fanaticism, and unhealthy imitation. The story of Scottish revivals is inspiring for the role played by men of scholarship, wisdom, and prudence, and does much to remove the prejudice. Describing the effects of the revival in Easter Ross about the middle of the eighteenth century, Hugh Miller wrote that they were felt 'for more than eighty years after. There were few dwellings, however humble, in which regularly as the day rose and set, family worship was not kept; and in the course of an evening walk, the voice of Psalms might be heard from almost every hamlet.' What Hugh Miller wrote of his native district could be said of many another place during the long history of revivals in Scotland." -- Publisher

    Cowan, E.J., Montrose, for Covenant and King, ISBN: 0297772090 9780297772095.

    Cowan, Henry, The Influence of the Scottish Church in Christendom, 1896.

    Cowan, Ian Borthwick, The Later Scottish Covenanters, 1660-88, ISBN: 0575021055 9780575021051.

    Cowan, Ian Borthwick, The Scottish Reformation: Church and Society in Sixteenth Century Scotland, ISBN: 0312705190 9780312705190.

    Craig, John (1512-1600), Communion Catechism (1592).
    Craig, John, Communion Catechism (1592)
    http://www.swrb.com/newslett/actualnls/communca.htm

    Cromwell, Oliver (1599-1658), An Historical Account of the Triumphant Spirit of the Whigs; Briefly Shewing the Rise and Progress of the Covenanted Work of Reformation, the defection of the Kirk of Scotland therefrom, and the firm adherence of the seceding brethren thereto. With an appendix, containing sundry excerpts from several godly letters.

    *Cunningham, John (1819-1893), The Church History of Scotland: From the Commencement of the Christian Era to the Present Time, 1882, 2nd edition, 2 volumes. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #30.
    "Few people are as well qualified to write such a history as the author of these volumes. Provides a vivid recounting of the struggle for independence and religious freedom." -- Cyril J. Barber

    Cunningham, William (1805-1861), and James Buchanan (1804-1870), Proposal for the Foundation and Formation of Libraries in the Manses of the Free Church of Scotland: With a Catalogue of Books.

    *Cunningham, William (1805-1861), The Scottish Reformation, Tercentenary of. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
    " 'Contains papers read at this commemoration in August of 1860 by Cunningham, Begg, Symington, Hetherington, M'Crie, Wylie, Binnie and others. Notes that 'Next to the advent of our blessed Saviour, the Reformation from Popery is the most remarkable and glorious event recorded in modern history.' Shows how the Reformation affected every area of life in Scotland." -- Publisher

    Defoe, Daniel, An Ecclesiastical History of Scotland. Containing the State of the Church of that Nation, From the Time of Queen Mary to the Union, 1734.

    Dodds, James (1813-1874), The Fifty Years' Struggle of the Scottish Covenanters 1638-1688, fifth edition. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
    " 'This volume does not pretend to be an exhaustive History of the Period selected, or properly a History at all. It is only a series of descriptive Sketches, meant to represent in outline the successive phases of the Covenanting Struggle. The subject is a noble one for a History, having an epic completeness -- a beginning, middle, and end -- with it clearly-defined half century . . . The main body of the Narrative has been based on a careful collation of the best authorities -- those contemporary or nearly contemporary with the events . . . I have also had the privilege . . . of examining the documents of the period in the State Paper Office," notes the author. Indexed." -- Publisher
    Dodds, James (1813-1874), The Fifty Years' Struggle of the Scottish Covenanters, 1638-88 (1860)
    http://archive.org/details/fiftyyearsstrugg00dodd

    Donaldson, George, The Scottish Reformation (Cambridge, England: At the University Press, 1972), ISBN: 0521086752.
    "A brilliantly written treatment of the way in which Protestantism was established in Scotland." -- Cyril J. Barber

    Donaldson, G., "Scottish Presbyterian Exiles in England, 1584-5," Records of Scottish Church History Society 14 (1962), 67-80

    Donaldson, Gordon and Robert Morpeth Who's Who in Scottish History

    Duncan, J. Ligon, III and David W. Hall, The Westminster Assembly: A Guide to Basic Bibliography (Oak Ridge, TN [The Covenant Foundation, 190 Manhattan Avenue, Oak Ridge 37830]: The Covenant Foundation), ISBN: 1884416012.

    *Fairly, John (1729-1806), An Humble Attempt in Defense of Reformation Principles; Particularly on the Head of the Civil Magistrate. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #25.
    "The title continues: 'Wherein the gross falsehoods, calumnies, and imposed sense, palmed by Mr. John Goodlet, upon the Testimony emitted by the Reformed Presbytery, are exposed and confuted; and said Testimony vindicated. As also, the seceding scheme of political principles more fully detected;-- and discovered to be inconsistent with the law of nature, light of divine revelation, and covenanted testimony of the Church of Scotland.' Goold, in his THE REFORMED PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN SCOTLAND: ITS ORIGIN AND HISTORY 1680-1876, writes of Fairly and this book, 'He was very zealous and outspoken in his maintenance of Church principles, and unsparing in his condemnation and exposure of the shortcomings of other denominations. This caused him to be both feared and disliked by many outside of his own communion; yet by the ministers who were nearest his residence, and who came most frequently in contact with him, he was greatly esteemed. He was fearless of consequences in the discharging of his duties. On one occasion, when in Ireland, his scathing exposure of Popery so irritated the Catholics, that three of them resolved to disturb his next meeting by musical instruments (and remember no faithful Presbyterian used this 'badge of Popery' -- musical instruments -- in their public meetings -- RB). They came prepared to do this, but were so overcome by the grave dignity of the man, and by the truth he spoke, that they could do nothing but quietly listen. Two of them, it is said, became earnest Protestants. On another occasion he denounced 'unpreaching bishops,' and declared that his Lordship of Bangor was worse than Balaam's ass, which spoke once at least, and rebuke the madness of the prophet. Some were so highly offended that they resolved to waylay and stone the preacher. Mr. Fairly was aware of this, but refused to change his route. As he approached the ambuscade, a dispute arose as to his identity; some held that it was the object of their hate, others said, 'No, never a bit of him; who ever saw a mountain minister ride such a good horse?' and while they disputed he got beyond their reach. One who knew him writes thus: 'I had some knowledge of the elder Fairley; he fearlessly attacked the reigning follies of his age, and preached the Gospel in a familiar but forcible style of eloquence. In his great field days, and when contending for the Testimony of the Martyrs, he was unsparing in the use of arrows, oft broke a lance with the Pope, and drove rusty nails into our venerable Establishment, and lashed the Secession and Relief for their declensions.' so pointed was his dealing with the sins of the times, that many left his meetings when he came to the application of his discourse . . . He took part in the controversy with the Seceders, and published a pamphlet in reply to Goodlet, the Anti-burgher minister of Sanquhar, in which he gives a scathing exposure of the weakness and inconsistency of his opponent, and directs against him all his resources of humour and sarcasm, as well as the weightier weapons of solid argument. But it was in proclaiming the riches of the glorious Gospel to cast audiences under the open canopy of heaven, that the power of Fairley was fully disclosed. He was undoubtedly the preacher among the 'Four Johns.' He had a commanding presence, a well-furnished mind, and a fluent and forcible utterance; and when he warmed to his grand theme, his words moved the hearts of the crowds that had gathered around him, and many owned him as their spiritual father.' (pp. 221-222). This book (of 283 pages), is another Reformed Presbyterian classic!" -- Publisher

    Foster, F.M., History of the Decline and Extinction of Psalm-singing in the Presbyterian Church.

    Furgol, Edward M., A Regimental History of the Covenanting Armies, 1639-1651. ISBN: 0859761940 9780859761949.
    Includes bibliographical references (pp. 426-436), and index.

    *Geneva Bible Notes, 1599
    The GENEVA BIBLE contained "marginal notes which were heavily influenced by John Calvin, John Knox, and many other leaders of the Reformation. The GENEVA BIBLE was the predominant English translation during the period in which the English and Scottish Reformations gained great impetus. Iain Murray, in his classic work on revival and the interpretation of prophecy, THE PURITAN HOPE, notes that, 'the two groups in England and Scotland developed along parallel lines, like two streams originating at one fountain. The fountain was not so much Geneva, as the Bible which the exiles newly translated and issued with many marginal notes . . . it was read in every Presbyterian and Puritan home in both realms.' (p. 7). This time also saw the rise of the forces for covenanted Reformation against the corruption and abuses of prelacy and the royal factions. Darkness was dispelled as people read this Bible and saw for themselves that there is no authority above the Holy Scriptures.
    "Although most people today have never heard of the GENEVA BIBLE, it was so popular from 1560 to 1644 that it went through 140 plus printings. The reason for its popularity among the faithful is obvious: the marginal notes promoted a full-orbed, nation-changing Protestantism. . . !
    " 'By 1599, the GENEVA BIBLE . . . added many Calvinist annotations for household use' (Bremer, The Puritan Experiment, p. 12). A number of the notes argued for family worship and instruction by the head of the household. Puritanism in the British Isles is known as an effort to continue the Reformation of the church in the area of worship and church government. However, the Puritans also sought to reform the family life according to Biblical principles . . . as a result of their efforts they 'were creators of the English Christian marriage, the English Christian family, and the English Christian home'." (J.I. Packer, A Quest for Godliness, p. 260) -- Publisher
    1599 Geneva Bible Notes
    http://www.reformedreader.org/gbn/en.htm
    For other GENEVA NOTES text see the following listed below:

  • KING JAMES BIBLE WITH THE GENEVA BIBLE NOTES, 1672,
  • 1599 GENEVA BIBLE, Tolle Lege Press restoration,
  • THE 1599 GENEVA BIBLE, TOLLE LEGE ONLINE EDITION.
  • "1599 GENEVA BIBLE, Tolle Lege Press Restoration, Fourth Printing, 2008, Probable Errata Listing," and
  • "A Resolution That Tolle Lege Press and White Hall Press of Chicago Complete the Limited Modernization of the 1599 GENEVA BIBLE Begun in 2004."
  • *King James Bible With the Geneva Bible Notes, 1672. This is considered to be a superior text to the 1599 GENEVA BIBLE, which is said to be about 80 percent Tyndale translation. A Christian classic. Considered to be among the ten greatest books in the English language. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive and in The Amazing Christian Library.
    "The best Reformation translation (King James Version), combined with the best Bible notes of the first Reformation, the GENEVA BIBLE notes. A great tool for public, family, and private worship and study. Printed from a marvelously clean original copy, surpassing the quality of all other printings (of the GENEVA BIBLE NOTES in particular), we have seen. Contains almost 1000 (8.5 X 11 inch), pages with notes on the complete Bible (Old and New Testaments), making this a veritable library of study and classic Protestant commentary in just one book." -- Publisher
    The following title is apparently an alternative edition of the 1672 AKJV with GENEVA NOTES:
    James, King of England, Lancelot Andrewes, Theodore de Beze, Franciscus Junius, and John Canne, The Holy Bible: Containing the Old and New Testament; Newly translated out of the originall tongues and with the former translations diligently compared and revised by his Majesties speciall command; With most profitable Annotations [probably the GENEVA NOTES -- compiler] upon all the hard places, and other things of great importance; Which notes have never before been set forth with this new translation; but are now placed in due order with great care and industrie. "Publisher: [Amsterdam]: [Stephen Swart], Printed in the Year MDCLXXII."
    The Authorized King James Version of 1611 (Pure Cambridge Edition), Digital Text
    "The PURE CAMBRIDGE EDITION (first published circa 1900), is the product of the process of textual purification that has occurred since 1611 when the AUTHORIZED VERSION was completed, and has been used (often unwittingly), as the received text for many decades. Millions of copies conformed to this edition were issued by Bible and missionary societies in the twentieth century. This text stands in contrast to all other editions (especially newly edited and modernised ones). . . ." -- excerpt from Bible Protector homepage

    *Calvin, John (1509-1564), et al. John Knox, Theodore Beza, Miles Coverdale, William Whittingham, Anthony Gilby, Martin Luther, and others], Peter A. Lillback (foreword), Tolle Lege Press (preface), Gary DeMar (Notes to the Modern Reader), Marshall Foster (The History and Impact of the Geneva Bible), 1599 Geneva Bible, (Tolle Lege Press, 2006, 2007), 1400 pages, ISBN: 0975484699 9780975484692 0975484613 9780975484616 0975484621 9780975484623. Available (Tolle Lege Press restoration) on the Puritan Hard Drive.
    "When the Pilgrims arrived in America in 1620, they brought along supplies, a consuming passion to advance the Kingdom of Christ, a bright hope for the future, and the Word of God. Clearly, their most precious cargo was the Bible. The GENEVA BIBLE, printed over 200 times between 1560 and 1644, was the most widely read and influential English Bible of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. This superb translation was the product of the best Protestant scholars of the day and became the Bible of choice for many of the greatest writers, thinkers, and historical figures of that time [but the translation was surpassed by the AUTHORIZED KING JAMES VERSION in 1611, see 'Textual Criticism' -- compiler]. The GENEVA BIBLE is unique among all other Bibles. It was the first Bible to use chapters and numbered verses and became the most popular version of its time because of the extensive marginal notes. These notes, written by Reformation leaders such as John Calvin, John Knox, Miles Coverdale, William Whittingham, Anthony Gilby, and others, were included to explain and interpret the scriptures for the common people. For nearly half a century these notes helped the people of England, Scotland, and Ireland understand the Bible and true liberty. King James despised the GENEVA BIBLE because he considered the notes on key political texts to be seditious [to question the Divine Right of Kings -- compiler] and a threat to his authority. Unlike the KING JAMES VERSION, the GENEVA BIBLE was not authorized by the government. It was truly a Bible by the people and for the people. You can see why this remarkable version with its profound marginal notes played a key role in the formation of the American Republic. Until now, the only complete version available was a large, cumbersome, and difficult-to-read facsimile edition. But this new edition contains all the original words and notes [see the errata listing below -- compiler], but the type set has been enlarged and the font style change for today's reader." -- Publisher
    "This is the Bible that eventually put an end to Feudalism in Europe, strengthened Puritans, Quakers, and came to America on the Mayflower. This was the first Bible published in the language of the common people, the first Bible to contain commentary and verse numbers, and the first Bible written in English from Greek and Hebrew texts available from Constantinople, not from the Latin Vulgate. The dynamite in this Bible is the commentary accounting for about one third of its length.
    "The Church of England and King James were so upset they determined to create a new translation. They called it the KING JAMES VERSION. They choose to use language so formal and grand, even by the standards of those days, that the common people would find difficult to understand. The GENEVA BIBLE was found seditious by it's insertions of commentary that spoke directly about the priesthood of lay believers, the church as naturally anti-oligarchy, and setting forth some other ideas considered anarchy by the King, but meaning freedom to the masses who read it. . . .
    "Important facts to remember about this Bible. The Reformation was strong in England and the Lollards were a lay group of huge influence that had to go underground. English Christian theologians, not Catholics and not Anglicans, fled in huge numbers to Geneva for freedom. Geneva was not part of Switzerland at that time, because Geneva was its own city-state. . . . The GENEVA BIBLE was printed 1560-1644. THE KING JAMES VERSION was published in 1611. The GENEVA BIBLE was against the law to own. . . ." -- Reader's Comment
    Available "in printed formats with various binding options from Tolle Lege Press. Tolle Lege Press has given Puritan Downloads permission to provide a PDF copy of their retypeset and fully searchable edition of the 1599 GENEVA BIBLE (Copyright 2006-2008, Tolle Lege Press), on the Puritan Hard Drive.
    "The GENEVA BIBLE is the Puritan Bible with Reformation promoting marginal notes authored by prominent leaders of the Reformation (during the time of John Calvin and John Knox). The New Testament was translated out of the Greek, by Theodore Beza. The GENEVA BIBLE was the predominant English translation during the period in which the English and Scottish Reformations gained great impetus.
    "Iain Murray, in his classic work on revival and the interpretation of prophecy, THE PURITAN HOPE, notes,

    The two groups in England and Scotland developed along parallel lines, like two streams originating at one fountain. The fountain was not so much Geneva, as the Bible which the exiles newly translated and issued with many marginal notes . . . it was read in every Presbyterian and Puritan home in both realms. (p. 7)
    "This time also saw the rise of the forces for covenanted Reformation against the corruption and abuses of prelacy and the royal factions. Darkness was dispelled as people read this Bible and saw for themselves that there is no authority above the Holy Scriptures. Discerning this truth, it became apparent that the civil tyranny and the heretical superstitions imposed by Pope, King and Bishops were to be resisted unto death, if necessary (i.e. because these innovations in church and state were opposed to the Kingship of Christ and the law of His kingdom, as set forth in Holy Scripture).
    "Moreover, this is the Bible that led to the King James edition. James . . . did not want the Calvinistic marginal notes of the GENEVA BIBLE getting into the hands of the people because he considered them 'seditious' hence, he authorized the KING JAMES VERSION as a substitute (though the KJV far surpasses modern translations).
    "Although most people today have never heard of the GENEVA BIBLE, it was so popular from 1560 to 1644 that it went through 140 plus printings. The reason for its popularity among the faithful is obvious: the marginal notes promoted a full-orbed, nation-changing Protestantism! Taking a modern work, such as the SCOFIELD REFERENCE BIBLE, and comparing the notes to those of the GENEVA BIBLE, it will readily be seen that the religion of the Protestant Reformation bears no resemblance to much of the nonsense being prattled today!
    "Additionally, the later editions of the GENEVA BIBLE (like this 1599 edition), are more strongly Calvinistic and anti-Papal noted by Eason in THE GENEVAN BIBLE, NOTES ON ITS PRODUCTION AND DISTRIBUTION. . . ."
    The notes of TOMSON'S NEW TESTAMENT of 1576, which took the place of the New Testament of the Bible of 1560 in many editions from 1587 onward, are entirely different from those in the GENEVA BIBLE. They are taken from Beza's Latin Testament, and are controversial and strongly Calvinistic.
    "Furthermore, Eason cites Pocock (a rabid anti-Calvinist), in the same book,
    The changes adopted in the GENEVA BIBLE and New Testament synchronize with the gradual spread of the Calvinistic heresy and the contemporaneous development of hatred of the whole Papal system of doctrine. The notes attacked the Sacramental teaching of the Church, substituting for it the Calvinistic doctrines of election and reprobation. They taught that Sacraments are nothing more than signs and seals of grace previously given to the elect. All passages about the Sacraments are explained away.
    ("We cite this quote, though it is full of a good deal of devilish nonsense, to demonstrate that even the enemies of biblical truth recognized the powerful impact that the GENEVA BIBLE was having in furthering the Protestant Reformation, as well as to show that the notes in the later versions of the GENEVA BIBLE were moving in the direction of a more distinct testimony against error and for the truth." -- RB) -- Publisher
    "There were three primary editions of the GENEVA BIBLE:
    (1) The editions that follow the first edition of 1560.
    (2) The editions in which TOMSON'S NEW TESTAMENT of 1576 is substituted for the 1560 New Testament.
    (3) The Bibles from 1598 that contain the Notes on Revelation of Francis Junius."
    "In our opinion, the notes in the 1599 edition were the most faithful to Scripture." -- The Genevan Bible, Notes on its Production and Distribution [Of course, the judgment and candor of Calvin are renown. This Bible played a key role in the Reformation, and anyone not using it 'will be the poorer for their neglect.' However, very few works are without caveats. Calvin used the LATIN VULGATE. His comments had to be translated from French. Experts (see 'Textual Criticism'), consider the authorized KING JAMES VERSION to be the most accurate translation. It used a literal approach to translation of the Traditional Text, which is referred to today as the Majority Text or Textus Receptus. Beza's translation of the New Testament is in a different category. One is urged to not neglect the knowledge developed over 400 years of Reformed scholarship since 1599. For example, compare the 1599 GENEVA BIBLE (1400 pages, 1366 in the Tolle Lege restoration edition), annotation with the annotation, theological notes, text notes, scripture notes, and other study aids of the NEW GENEVA STUDY BIBLE (2228 pages), with its own noted caveats. -- compiler]
    "Features of the Tolle Lege 1599 GENEVA BIBLE:
  • Word-for-word accuracy with the 1599 Geneva Bible [see the errata listing below -- compiler]
  • Original cross references
  • Modern spelling
  • Original study notes by Reformers
  • Old English Glossary
  • 2-page Family Tree Chart
  • Presentation page with several family registry pages
  • Easy-to-read print [see the errata listing below -- compiler]
  • Size: 8.75" X 11.5"
  • Approximately 1,400 pages." -- Publisher
  • Excerpts from two articles on the 1599 GENEVA BIBLE may be read at the Puritan Downloads site: "The Forgotten Translation," Gary DeMar, President of American Vision and Honorary Member of the 1599 Geneva Bible Advisory Board, and "Introduction to the 1599 Geneva Bible," Marshall Foster, President of the Mayflower Institute, Member of the 1599 Geneva Bible Advisory Board.
    http://www.swrb.com/bibles/bibles.htm
    "The GENEVA BIBLE has a unique place in history. It is some times called the BREECHES BIBLE. That term comes from the reference in Genesis 3:7 where it says that Adam and Eve clothed themselves in 'breeches' made from fig leaves. It is the product of Protestant scholars who had taken refuge in Geneva, Switzerland during the reign of Queen 'Bloody Mary' of England (1553-1558). It is also known as the Bible that the Pilgrims brought to America. It is older than the KING JAMES VERSION and is considered by some to be more 'Protestant' than the KING JAMES VERSION." [probably because of the Notes of the Geneva Reformers -- compiler] -- Reader's Comment
    "I've seen the facsimile versions of the GENEVA BIBLE and they don't even come close to this edition. The legibility and readability of this edition is far superior to other editions. -- Reader's Comment
    Tolle Lege Press edition of the 1599 Geneva Bible
    http://www.GenevaBible.com
    Perhaps the unique wisdom in the annotation by the Reformers, John Calvin, Martin Luther, John Knox, and Theodore Beza, among others, is due to their doctrinal position of the absolute sovereignty of God and the utter depravity of mankind. The notes are also very concise, explaining the meaning of Scripture and free of pedantic material.
    Sample notes from the 1599 GENEVA BIBLE, the Tolle Lege Press restored edition of 2007:
  • Genesis 1:11 "So that we see it is the only power of God's word that maketh the earth fruitful, which else naturally is barren.
  • Genesis 1:12 "This sentence is so oft repeated, to signify that God made all his creatures to serve to his glory, and to the profit of man: but for sin they were accursed, yet to the elect, by Christ they are restored, and serve to their wealth.
  • Genesis 2:16 "So that man might know there was a sovereign Lord, to whom he owed obedience.
  • Genesis 2:17 "By this death he meaneth the separation of man from God, who is our life and chief felicity: and also that our disobedience is the cause thereof.
  • Genesis 3:4 "This is Satan's chiefest subtlety, to cause us not to fear God's threatenings.
  • Genesis 4:5 "Because he was an hypocrite, and offered only for an outward show without sincerity of heart.
  • Genesis 9:6 "Not only by the magistrate, but oft times God raiseth up one murderer to kill another.
    Therefore to kill man is to deface God's image, and so injury is not only done to man, but also to God.
  • Psalm 37:1,7,11 "1 This Psalm containeth exhortation and consolation for the weak, that are grieved at the prosperity of the wicked, and the affliction of the godly. 7 For how prosperously soever the wicked do live for the time, he doth affirm their felicity to be vain and transitory, because they are not in the favor of God, but in the end they are destroyed as his enemies. 11 And how miserably that the righteous seemeth to live in the world, yet his end is peace, and he is in the favor of God, he is delivered from the wicked, and preserved.
  • Psalm 37:5 "Be not led by thine own wisdom, but obey God, and he will finish his work in thee.
  • Psalm 37:6 "As the hope of the daylight causeth us not to be offended with the darkness of the night: so ought we patiently to trust that God will clear our cause and restore us to our right.
  • Psalm 37:8 "Meaning, except he moderate his affections, he shall be led to do as they do.
  • Psalm 37:12 "The godly are assured that the power and craft of the wicked shall not prevail against them, but fall on their own necks, and therefore ought patiently to abide God's time, and in the meanwhile bewail their sins, and offer up their tears, is a sacrifice of their obedience.
  • Psalm 37:16 "For they are daily fed as with Manna from heaven, and have sufficient, when the wicked have never enough, but ever hunger.
  • Psalm 37:25 "Though the just man die, yet God's blessings are extended to his posterity, and though God suffer some just man to lack temporal benefits, yet he recompenseth him with spiritual treasures.
  • Psalm 37:29 "They shall continually be preserved under God's wings, and have at least inward rest.
  • Psalm 37:30 "These three points are required of the faithful, that their talk be godly, that God's law be in their heart, and that their life be upright.
  • Psalm 37:37 "He exhorteth the faithful to mark diligently the examples both of God's mercies, and also of his judgments.
  • Psalm 37:39 "He showeth that the patient hope of the godly is never in vain, but in the end hath good success, though for a time God prove them by sundry tentations.
  • John 1:1 "The Son of God is of one, and the selfsame eternity or everlastingness, and of one and the selfsame essence or nature, with the Father.
    "From his beginning, as the Evangelist saith, 1 John 1:1, as though he said, that the world began not then to have his being, when God began to make all that was made: for the word was even then when all things that were made, began to be made, and therefore he was before the beginning of all things.
    "Had his being.
    "This word, That, pointeth out unto us a peculiar and choice thing above all other, and putteth a difference between this Word, which is the Son of God, and the Laws of God, which otherwise also are called the word of God.
    "This word (With) putteth out the distinction of persons to us.
    "This word (Word) is the first in order in the sentence, and is that which the learned call (Subjectum) and this word (God) is the latter in order, and the same which the learned call (Predicatum.)
  • John 1:3 "The son of God declareth that same his everlasting Godhead, both by the creating of all things, and also by the preserving of them, and especially by the excellent gifts of reason and understanding, wherewith he that beautified man above all other creatures.
    "Paul expoundeth this place, Col. 1:15 and 16 [Colossians 1:15,16].
    "That is, as the Father did work, so did the Son work with him: for he was fellow worker with him.
    "Of all those things which were made, nothing was made without him.
  • Jude 1:24 "He commendeth them to the grace of God, declaring sufficiently that it is God only that can give us that constancy which he requireth of us.
  • Hebrews 13:8b "all precepts of manners, and that is this: That we ought to quiet and content ourselves in Christ only: for there was yet never any man saved without the knowledge of him, neither is at this day saved, neither shall be saved hereafter.
  • Revelation 4:9 "God is said to have glory, honor, kingdom, and such like given unto him, when we godly and reverently set forth that which is properly and only his." -- excerpts from 1599 Geneva Bible, Tolle Lege Press, 2006, 2007)
  • 1599 Geneva Bible, Tolle Lege Press Restoration, Fourth Printing, 2008, Probable Errata Listing (June 30, 2014, revised August 15, 2014, revised September 4, 2015)
    http://www.lettermen2.com/1599errata.html
    A Resolution That Tolle Lege Press and White Hall Press of Chicago Complete the Limited Modernization of the 1599 GENEVA BIBLE Begun in 2004 and of all Spin-off Publications (August 15, 2014, revised September 7, 2015)
    http://www.lettermen2.com/1599resolve.html
    The 1599 Geneva Bible, Tolle Lege edition, online
    http://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=matthew%201&version=GNV
    There is confusion in certain library records for the 1599 and 1672 Bibles that will only be resolved by physical inspection. The following is thought to be an alternative record for the 1599 GENEVA BIBLE.
    *Beze, Theodore de, Joachim Camerarius, Pierre Loyseleur, Laurence Tomson, and Franciscus Junius, The Bible, That is, The Holy Scriptures Conteined in the Old and New Testament. "Publisher: [Amsterdam?]: [publisher not identified], [approximately 1599]."
    1599 Geneva Bible Notes
    http://www.reformedreader.org/gbn/en.htm

    *Gillespie, George (1613-1648), Ezekiel's Vision of Millennial Glory, Preparation for Coming Reformation and a Remedy for Backsliding and Lukewarmness. Available (THE PURITAN FAST SERMONS, 1640-1652, THE WORKS OF GEORGE GILLESPIE, and as two MP3 files), on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available (two MP3 files), on Reformation Bookshelf CD #18.
    "This sermon was originally preached to England's House of Commons 'At Their Late Solemn Fast, Wednesday, March 27, 1644.' It is taken from volume one of Gillespie's two volume WORKS. It gives great insight into the covenanted unity, uniformity and worldwide Reformation sought by the majority of the Westminster Divines and the best of the civil leaders of Gillespie's day. Gillespie searchingly deals with the individual, the church and the state, while painting a Scriptural picture of prophesied earthly victory (Isa. 2:2-5 [Isaiah 2:2-5], Ezek. 47:1-12 [Ezekiel 47:1-12], etc.) -- in classic historicist postmillennial style -- which is sure to stir even the coldest Christian heart. He shows how the worst disease the land can suffer is corruption in religion (particularly as exhibited in false worship), rebukes those opposing the Solemn League and Covenant and calls upon all to maintain (and even improve upon), the Reformation attainments whereunto we have already attained. (Phil. 3:16 [Philippians 3:16]). It is also interesting to note, especially since this sermon was preached before civil rulers, that though Gillespie points out the need for humility, repentance, prayer, tears, godly affections, sanctified minds and honorable actions, he does not forget to mention the importance of a covenanted army in this great cause of Christ's Covenanted Reformation. Also noted is the destruction of Antichrist, the calling and conversion of the Jews (Rom. 11 [Romans 11]), the two witnesses and the 1260 year apostasy. Gillespie closes with an appeal to the English House of Commons, with whom the Scots had 'joined in covenant and in arms,' to be faithful 'according to the word he (God -- RB), hath covenanted with you (i.e. in the Solemn League and Covenant -- RB), so his spirit remaineth among you' -- exhorting these magistrates to fear not but to be strong in the Lord, and in the power of his might. This is classic Covenanter preaching, among the best sermons you may ever hear!" -- Publisher

    *Gillespie, George (1613-1648), Reformation's Refining Fire; or, Iconoclastic Zeal Necessary to World Reformation by George Gillespie, audio file. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Also found in volume one of GILLESPIE'S WORKS.
    "This sermon, read by elder Lyndon Dohms, was originally preached to the House of Lords in the abbey church at Westminster during the days of the Westminster Assembly (on August 27, 1645). It deals with Malachi 3:2 and can also be found in volume one of GILLESPIE'S WORKS. The reading is approximately 80 minutes in length and for content this is likely the best sermon that we have ever carried. The glory of Christ is magnified in a soul stirring manner and at a level which is seldom (if ever), reached in our day. Though preaching before some of the most powerful men of his day, Gillespie does nothing to shave off the sharp edges of the whole counsel of God. He makes it abundantly clear that spiritual Reformation (individual, ecclesiastical and civil), is like a flaming fire which burns the dross of the flesh and is often hated and opposed by those that cry loudest for 'Reform.' On the other hand, the refining fire of Reformation which pleases God (and comes from His fatherly hands, filled with mercy, love and grace), not only turns his wrath from the nations (by granting the grace to remove the causes of His wrath), but invigorates the spirit with that iconoclastic zeal against sin (whether personal or corporate), that can only be produced by His sovereign power. Whole-hearted (covenanted) reformation is contrasted, throughout this sermon, with the half-hearted comfortable Christianity that has been common in most ages. Gillespie wields the sword of Scripture as few can in driving home a multitude of vitally important points. This sermon can be listened to over and over with increasing profit, as it contains a fullness which is almost impossible to absorb in just one sitting. Don't miss this one; it is a real gem!" -- Publisher

    Gillespie, George (1613-1648), James Renwick, Thomas Henderson, et al., Testimony-bearing Exemplified: A Collection Containing: I. Gillespie Against Association With Malignants, Together With The Causes of God's Wrath, Agreed Upon by the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland, met at Edinburgh, October, 1651: II. The Informatory Vindication, to Which is Subjoined, A Collection of Excellent Laws (or Eschol Grapes), in Favours of our Covenanted Reformation: to Which is Added A declaration of the Assembly, July ult. 1648 Concerning the Present Danger of Religion: Also, A Seasonable Warning Concerning the Present Imminent Dangers, and Duties Relating Thereto, by the Assembly, July 27, 1649.

    *Gillespie, George (1613-1648), Wholesome Severity Reconciled With Christian Liberty, 1645, two audio files. Available (PDF and MP3 files), on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on the Naphtali Press CD.
    "Gillespie was a major force at the Westminster Assembly. This rare item gives great insight into the original intent of the framers of the Westminster documents concerning matters of conscience, liberty, law, and government. Dr. Greg Bahnsen has noted how sections mirror modern theonomic thought. Read on cassette for the first time ever! This item can also be found in written form in volume four of Naphtali Press' Anthology of Presbyterian and Reformed Literature." -- Publisher
    Wholesome Severity Reconciled With Christian Liberty, or, The True Resolution of a Present Controversy Concerning Liberty of Conscience, 1645
    http://www.naphtali.com/severity.htm
    Gillespie, George, Wholesome Severity Reconciled With Christian Liberty
    http://www.covenanter.org/reformed/2016/4/21/wholesome-severity-reconciled-with-christian-liberty

    *Gillespie, George (1613-1648), The Works of George Gillespie, 2 volumes. A Christian classic. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
    " 'Gillespie was one of the Scottish commissioners to the Westminster Assembly. One of the great theologians of all time -- almost singlehandedly steering this august Assembly at certain points. As Hetherington notes, 'in all those debates no person took a more active part, or gained more distinction than George Gillespie,' though he was the youngest man there. Furthermore, Hetherington calls him a 'genius of the highest order,' and writes that his work 'dazzled and astonished his countrymen.' He 'held an undisputed position among the foremost of the distinguished men by whose talents and energy the Church of Scotland was delivered from the prelatic despotism' of that day. This rare work contains Gillespie's personal notes during the Westminster Assembly and A DISPUTE AGAINST ENGLISH POPISH CEREMONIES. A DISPUTE AGAINST ENGLISH POPISH CEREMONIES is a rare classic on Reformed worship, taking on all the arguments related to the use of man-made ceremonies in worship. Burned by the Prelates (Episcopalians) just after it first appeared in 1637, this masterful defense of the regulative principle has yet to be answered (by those that oppose God's sovereignty in worship). It ably, and in a detailed manner, refutes the old errors of Prelacy and Romanism -- many of which are being resurrected in our day by writers like James Jordan (and others abandoning historic Presbyterian [i.e. Biblical] worship). Gillespie's practical 'TREATISE OF MISCELLANY QUESTIONS,' contains 22 chapters. Topics dealt with range from: whether prophets and prophesying continued beyond the primitive church (answered in the negative); whether a sound heart and an unsound head can consist together; what are heresies and what is their purpose; are infants to be baptized; should the civil government attach a negative sanction to not swearing to the Solemn League and Covenant (against one aspect of Theonomy); etc. These WORKS also contains a memoir of Gillespie's life and writings, written by Hetherington, Gillespie's sermons before the house of commons, and much more!" -- Publisher

    *Gillespie, George (1613-1648), George Buchanan, John Brown (of Wamphray), David Hay Fleming, The Presbyterian's Armoury, 3 volumes, 1846. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
    "In terms of 'bang for your book buying buck,' you will not find more fire-power 'under one roof' than in THE PRESBYTERIAN'S ARMOURY! Can be purchased as the three volume set or individually as listed below."

  • Volume One of THE PRESBYTERIAN'S ARMOURY
    "Contains GILLESPIE'S LIFE AND WRITINGS by Hetherington, plus all of the following works by George Gillespie: A DISPUTE AGAINST ENGLISH POPISH CEREMONIES, 1637; AN ASSERTION OF THE GOVERNMENT OF THE CHURCH OF SCOTLAND, 1644; 111 PROPOSITIONS CONCERNING THE MINISTRY AND GOVERNMENT OF THE CHURCH, 1644; two of Gillespie's sermons, preached before the House of Common (1644), and the House of Lords (1645); and Gillespie's answers to Coleman which defend Presbyterian polity against Erastianism. 'Noted for his erudition, keen mind, powerful debating skills and articulate speech and often called 'Great Mr. Gillespie' in his day, he has been referred to as the prince of Scottish theologians and the supreme defender of Presbyterian church government'." (Nigel Cameron, editor, Dictionary of Scottish Church History and Theology, p. 359)
  • Volume Two of THE PRESBYTERIAN'S ARMOURY
    "Contains all of the following works by George Gillespie: AARON'S ROD BLOSSOMING, OR THE DIVINE ORDINANCE OF CHURCH GOVERNMENT VINDICATED; A TREATISE OF MISCELLANY QUESTIONS; NOTES OF DEBATES AND PROCEEDINGS OF THE ASSEMBLY OF DIVINES AT WESTMINSTER (February 1644 to January 1645). Gillespie is most famous for his AARON'S ROD which Walker called 'the chef d'oeuvre' of Scottish ecclesiastical theology. (cited in Cameron, Dictionary, pp. 359-360). He was a thundering preacher and a prominent member of the famous Westminster Assembly. Johnston, in TREASURY OF THE SCOTTISH COVENANT cites the following concerning Gillespie: 'That is an excellent youth; my heart blesses God in his behalf. There is no man whose parts in a public dispute I do so admire. He has studied so accurately all the points that are yet to come to our Assembly; he has got so ready, so assured, so solid a way of public debating; that however there be in the Assembly divers very excellent men, yet, in my poor judgement, there is not one who speaks more rationally and to the point than that brave youth has done ever (Baillie from his Letters and Journals). He was one of the great men that had a chief hand in penning our most excellent Confession of Faith and Catechisms. He was a most grave and bold man, and had a most wonderful gift given him for disputing and arguing. The end of a dispute held by him with some of the promoters of the Engagement was, that Glencairn said, 'There is no standing before this great and mighty man.' He was called malleus Malignantium, 'the hammer of the Malignants' (Woodrow's Analecta), 558 pages."
  • Volume Three of THE PRESBYTERIAN'S ARMOURY
    "Contains: Samuel Rutherford's LEX, REX, or THE LAW AND THE PRINCE; John Brown of Wamphray's APOLOGETICAL RELATION; David Calderwood's PASTOR AND PRELATE, OR REFORMATION AND CONFORMITY SHORTLY COMPARED; and CAUSES OF THE LORD'S WRATH AGAINST SCOTLAND AGREED UPON BY THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY, 1651. LEX, REX is 'the great political text of the Covenanters.' (Johnston citing Innes in Treasury of the Scottish Covenant, p. 305). 'Rutherford was the first to formulate the great constitutional principle Lex est Rex -- the law is King . . . much of the doctrine has become the constitutional inheritance of all countries in modern times.' (Idem.). Brown's anti-prelatical work deals with the lawfulness of defensive wars, ecclesiastical and civil government, the hearing of curates, etc. Brown's writing has been said to be 'decidedly superior to most of the Scottish writers of his day, and even to Owen.' Calderwood upholds Presbyterianism over and against prelacy. THE CAUSES OF GOD'S WRATH was written anonymously (James Guthrie was the reputed author), and was at one time burnt along with LEX, REX, 615 pages." -- Publisher
  • The Covenant Between God and Kings, from A DEFENSE OF LIBERTY
    http://www.constitution.org/vct/vindiciae1a.htm

    *Gillespie, Patrick (1617-1675), The Ark of the Covenant Opened; or, A Treatise of the Covenant of Redemption Between God and Christ, as the Foundation of the Covenant of Grace, 1677. A Christian classic. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #27.
    "John Owen, in his preface to this treatise writes, 'I do freely declare my judgement that for order, method, perspicuity in treating, and solidity of argument, the ensuing discourse exceedeth whatsoever single treatise I have seen written with the same design.' (cited in Johnston, Treasury of the Scottish Covenant, p. 337). David Lachman tells us that 'in addition to arranging his brother's papers (published as Miscellany Questions [now found in George Gillespie's two volume Works, -- RB]), Gillespie used his materials also for the beginning of the first of a five-volume work on the covenant. Only two were published: THE ARK OF THE TESTAMENT OPENED . . . (1661) and THE ARK OF THE COVENANT OPENED . . . (1677), respectively treating the nature and kinds of covenants and the Mediator of the covenant. The third, on the condition of the covenant and the instrumentality of faith in justification, was extant in 1707, when the remaining two, respectively on the privileges and duties of the covenant, were believed lost (Analecta, I, 168-9) . . . Gillespie (was a -- RB), Covenanter, Principal of Glasgow University, and leading Protester.' (Nigel Cameron, editor, Dictionary of Scottish Church History and Theology, p. 382). In this volume Gillespie proves:

    1. That there is such a Covenant (of Redemption).
    2. The necessity of it.
    3. The nature, properties, and parties thereof.
    4. The tenor, articles, subject matter of Redemption.
    5. The commands, conditions, and promises annexed.
    6. The harmony of the Covenant of suretyship made with Christ, and the Covenant of reconciliation made with sinners: wherein they agree, wherein they differ.
    7. Grounds of comfort from the Covenant of suretiship; and, of course, much, much more!
    "Owen, in his preface (who also notes his long friendship with Gillespie), further underscores the importance of this work when he writes, 'For the Doctrine hereof, or the truth herein, is the very Center wherein all the lines concerning the Grace of God and our own duty, do meet; wherein the whole of Religion doth consist. Hence unto the understanding, Notions, and Conception, that men have of these Covenants with God, and according as the Doctrines of them is stated in their minds, their Conceptions of all other sacred Truths, or Doctrines, are conformed'." -- Publisher
    Ark of the Covenant Opened: Chapter 3
    http://www.truecovenanter.com/supralapsarian/pgilles_aoc_cap03.html

    *Gillespie, Patrick (1617-1675), Rulers Sins: The Causes of National Judgments, or a Sermon Preached at the Fast, Upon the 26th Day of December, Prov. XIV. 34 [Proverbs 14:34]; 2 Kings XVII. 22,23 [2 Kings 17:22,23]; Ezek. XIX. 14 [Ezekiel 19:14], or a Sermon Preached at the Fast, Upon the 26th Day of December 1650. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
    Notwithstanding the Lord turned not from the fierceness of his great wrath wherewith his anger was kindled against Judah, because of the provocations that Manasseh had provoked him withal. (2 Kings 23:26).
    "For these in public places of trust and power, that should bear down sin, are they not rather ringleaders in sin?" -- Patrick Gillespie
    Rulers Sins: The Causes of National Judgments
    http://www.truecovenanter.com/gillespie/gillespie_patrick_rulers_sins_causes_of_judgment.html

    Glasgow, W. Melancthon, Ray B. Lanning, and Nathan P. Eshelman, History of the Reformed Presbyterian Church in America: With Sketches of all her Ministry, Congregations, Missions, Institutions, Publications, etc., and Embellished With Over Fifty Portraits and Engravings, ISBN: 9781601780195 1601780192.
    "Gives the history of early covenanters in America. David Steele and others left the communion sometime prior to the synod of 1841 in Utica, Ohio (p. 108). Notice 'the alleged reason that the Synod had postponed its deliverance on "voluntary associations",' and they regarded the Synod as unfaithful to its duty." -- Publisher
    "Students of Presbyterian church history will discover a whole family of churches whose history sparkles with remarkable personalities and noteworthy achievements, however much they may have been forgotten in the years that followed. Reformed Presbyterians, Associate Reformed Presbyterians, and the dwindling numbers of those who once belonged to the United Presbyterian Church of North America, will all give thanks for the history that is brought to light in these pages. We 'Scottish Dissenting Presbyterians' have a goodly heritage. We have much to discover about our forbears in the faith, and what they accomplished in their day; and much as well to consider with regard to how their distinctive principles and practices may have something vital to contribute to our churches and to our nation today." -- Ray B. Lanning and Nathan P. Eshelman, from the Introduction
    http://www.reformedpresbyterian.org/conv_resources.html
    Glasgow, W. Melancthon, History of the Reformed Presbyterian Church in America, full text.
    http://www.archive.org/stream/historyofrefor00glas/historyofrefor00glas_djvu.txt

    Graham, John, The Revolution Settlement of the Church of Scotland: Its Provisions, in Several Respects, Inconsistent With the Approved Principles of the Second Reformation, 1841. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #30.
    Available in Lectures on the Principles of the Second Reformation
    http://www.covenanter.org/reformed/2015/8/18/the-reformed-presbyterian-churchs-of-scotland-lectures-on-the-principles-of-the-second-reformation

    Graham, John Remington, and Donald Livingston, A Constitutional History of Secession, ISBN: 1589800664 9781589800663.
    "That any State had a Constitutional right to secede is undeniable, the author makes that case airtight. From the dust cover, where Professor Clyde Wilson, University of South Carolina was quoted, 'Had I the power, I would require every professor of history, political science, and law in America to read Graham's work. Nowhere is there a truer and more thorough treatment of the origins and nature of freedom and self-government. This work is essential for those who would like to recover those great blessings'." -- Reader's Comment
    "I found this book by accident. After I started reading I could not put it down! John Graham has written the most comprehensive study on the late War Between the States. He brings to light the causes of war, little know facts about the people who conducted the war to the conduct carried out by Stanton through his insane generals. After reading this book everyone will know that the United States was destroyed by the war and through the illegal acts of President Abraham Lincoln. History, law, truth and justice were only part of the things lost during the war. The 600,000 men, untold numbers of civilians and the 8 billion dollars spent to destroy the south were a waste that can all be attributed to Lincoln. What a price was paid for the government we have today! A must read for all students of law and history. I would give ten stars if I could!" -- Reader's Comment

    Gurnall, William (1617-1679), The Magistrates Pourtraiture Drawn From the Word, and Preached in a Sermon at Stowe-Market in Suffolk: Upon August, the 20. 1656 Before the Election of Parliament-men for the Same County on Isaiah I.26 [Isaiah 1:26], the Former Part . . . .

    Guthrie, James (1612?-1661), and Archibald Johnston (1793-1818), Causes of the Lords Wrath Against Scotland, Manifested in his sad Late Dispensations. Whereunto is Added a Paper, Particularly Holding Forth the Sins of the Ministery, 1653. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
    http://www.truecovenanter.com/guthrie/guthrie_james_causes_of_wrath.html

    Guthrie, William, Michael Bruce, John Welwood, Richard Cameron, and Donald Cargill, Sermons Delivered in Times of Persecution in Scotland, ISBN: 1899003959 9781899003952. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.

    *Hall, David W., The Arrogance of the Modern: Historical Theology Held in Contempt, ISBN: 096503674X 9780965036740.
    "Into the breach comes a very well documented volume by David W. Hall, with the title, The Arrogance of the Modern: Historical Theology Held in Contempt. Early on in the book, Hall decries the tendency for researchers and theoreticians to cite only recent writings as backup of their work. He cites the concept that civilization is a democracy extending far back into time; the 'votes' of citizens of old, represented by their writings, are just as important as those written just yesterday.
    "To cap off his argument, Hall quotes a comment from Lord Acton, in which he said, 'Just as the loss of memory in an individual is a psychiatric defect calling for a medical treatment, so too any community which has no social memory is suffering from an illness.' Those who do not learn from history, as you will recall, are doomed to repeat it. And, I might add, history has far more of what the Clarence Pages of this generation despise than the present. But, the Balkanization brought on by Postmodern criticism may well be our 'unlearned lesson' that finally does us all in.
    "This volume is a closely-argued, well organized thesis. It is not easy reading but, with the complexity of the subject, I think it is as well written a volume as I have seen." -- William L. Brown

    Hay Fleming, David (1849-1931), The Story of the Scottish Covenants in Outline. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
    "A great short (96 pages of larger print), easy reading introduction to the covenants and the Covenanters. Tells the story of many of the Scottish religious bonds and the people and places that surrounded them. A good introductory study for home-schoolers or those that do not have time for the larger volumes covering this topic." -- Publisher
    http://archive.org/details/storyofscottishc00flemiala

    Hay Fleming, David (1849-1931), The Story of the Scottish Covenants in Outline. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
    "A great short (96 pages of larger print), easy reading introduction to the covenants and the Covenanters. Tells the story of many of the Scottish religious bonds and the people and places that surrounded them. A good introductory study for home-schoolers or those that do not have time for the larger volumes covering this topic." -- Publisher
    http://archive.org/details/storyofscottishc00flemiala

    *Henderson, Alexander (1583?-1646), The National Covenant (1638) and Solemn League and Covenant (1643). Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #27. Available in THE WESTMINSTER CONFESSION OF FAITH (1646).
    "The National Covenant, a Scottish Presbyterian document, primarily composed by Alexander Henderson and Archibald Johnstone of Wariston. It was composed in opposition to the 'policies of Charles I. Written in the context of the riots resulting from the imposition of 'Laud's Liturgy' in 1637 and the King's refusal to receive the petitions of supplicants for redress, the National Covenant was an appeal . . . to defend the true Reformed religion, and to decline the recent innovations in worship decreed by the King.' (Nigel Cameron, editor, Dictionary of Scottish Church History and Theology, p. 620)
    "Furthermore, it was 'an assertion by the Kirk of freedom from royal or state control, a personal oath of allegiance to Jesus Christ, the only Head of the Church, the King of kings, and a dedication of life to him. It stemmed directly from God's covenant of grace, was in the succession of those earlier bonds the Scots had made with God for his people's defence and deliverance, and represented a call in the Pauline sense to 'conduct themselves a citizens.' (Idem.). This covenant (and the Solemn League and Covenant described below), are still binding on all true Presbyterians and the hearty and steadfast renewal of these faithful documents would constitute a mighty means toward modern reformation, seeing that much of the contemporary church and all modern states have set themselves against the Lord, and against his anointed (Ps. 2:2 [Psalm 2:2]); excepting, maybe, the African state of Zambia, which seems to be presently reforming, but not yet covenanted to the Lord. The Solemn League and Covenant was first of all a religious covenant and secondly a civil league. 'After noting that they had one king and one Reformed religion and expressing their concern about the estate of both the Church and kingdom of England and Scotland, the signatories swear to preserve 'the Reformed Religion in the Church of Scotland' and the Reformation of religion in England and to bring the churches to the 'nearest Conjunction and Uniformity in Religion', confession, government, and worship. They also bound themselves to extirpate popery and prelacy as well as superstition, heresy and whatever is contrary to sound doctrine . . . to bring to trial all who hinder such reformation of religion or divide the king from his people and to continue such 'to all Posterity' and not suffer themselves to be withdrawn from 'this blessed Union and Conjunction.' (Ibid., pp. 786-789). This covenant gave teeth to the work of the Westminster Assembly and united three nations under the Lordship of Jesus Christ. It was publicly taken by the Westminster Divines and the English parliament on September 25th. 'On the 9th of October the king issued a proclamation from Oxford, denouncing this document as 'in truth nothing else but a traitorous and seditious combination against us and the established religion of this kingdom;' straitly charging and commanding all his loving subjects, upon their allegiance, 'that they presume not to take the said seditious and traitorous Covenant.' And at last an order was issued by the Parliament, in February 1644, commanding the Covenant to be taken throughout the kingdom of England by all persons above the age of 18 years; which order was accompanied by an exhortation prepared by the Assembly of Divines. In Scotland, as soon as information was received of what had taken place in London, the Committee of Estates ordered the Covenant to be subscribed by all ranks and conditions of people, on penalty of the confiscation of property, or such other punishment as his Majesty and the parliament might resolve to inflict.' (Hetherington The History of the Westminster Assembly of Divines, pp. 127-128). Furthermore, Hetherington goes on to call this bond 'the wisest, the sublimest, and the most sacred document ever framed by uninspired men.' (p. 134). If you want to understand Presbyterianism these two covenant documents offer as much light as any others we know of. They are inextricably linked to the Westminster Standards, historical testimony and the covenanted reformation. Some still believe that they will once again be renewed on an international basis near the beginning of the millennium, in preparation for the days when the earth shall be full of the knowledge of the Lord, as the waters cover the sea. (Isa. 11:9 [Isaiah 11:9]) With this sentiment we wholeheartedly concur!" -- Publisher
    Westminster Assembly (1643-1652), National Covenant
    http://www.covenanter.org/reformed/2015/4/1/the-national-covenant
    Henderson, Alexander (1583?-1646), The National, 1638 and Solemn League and Covenant, 1643
    http://www.swrb.com/newslett/actualnls/CRTSol.htm

    Henderson, Alexander (1583?-1646), Preparing for Covenant Renewal, MP3 file. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #2, #8.
    "Originally preached on the occasion of the swearing of the National Covenant of Scotland (1638). This sermon is read (by Lyndon Dohms), from the book SERMONS, PRAYERS AND PULPIT ADDRESSES by Henderson. It is a representative example of the focus of the Covenanted Reformation in its earlier stages." -- Publisher

    Henderson, Alexander (1583?-1646), Church of Scotland, General Assembly, Commission, Reformation of Church Government in Scotland, Cleared From Some Mistakes and Prejudices by the Commissioners of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland, now at London, 1644. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #23.

    Henderson, Alexander (1583?-1646), and Philip Nye (1596?-1672), The Covenant: With a Narrative of the Proceedings and Solemn Manner of Taking it by the Honourable House of Commons, and reverent Assembly of Divines the 25th day of September, at Saint Margarets in Westminster. Also, tvvo speeches delivered at the same time; the one by Mr. Philip Nye, the other by Mr. Alexander Hendersam. Published by speciall order of the House, 1643

    Henderson, Alexander (1583?-1646), and Philip Nye, 1596?-1672, Two Speeches Delivered Before the Subscribing of the Covenant, the 25. of September, at St. Margarets in Westminster the one by Mr. Philip Nye, the other by Mr. Alexander Henderson, 1643.

    Henderson, George David, The Claims of the Church of Scotland, 1951.

    Henderson, George David, Heritage, a Study of the Disruption, 1943.

    Henderson, George David, The Idea of the Covenant in Scotland, Evangelical Quarterly, 27, 1955, 1-14.

    Henderson, George David, Religious Life in Seventeenth-century Scotland, 1937.

    Henderson, Henry F., The Religious Controversies of Scotland, 1905.

    Herkless, John, Richard Cameron. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #17.
    "Part of the famous Scots series, this book chronicles the life of the Presbyterian Pastor know as the 'Lion of the Covenant.' Cameron rejected his early Episcopalian persuasion, subsequent to hearing 'the persecuted Gospel in the fields,' and after 'the wonderful working of the Lord by His powerful Spirit upon him' revealing 'a lively discovery of the sin and hazard of Prelacy,' he joined with ranks of the persecuted Covenanters, notes Howie (in Scots Worthies). He set an uncompromising standard for the gospel and against the enemies of Christ, for which he was hunted and ultimately martyred. In mockery of his testimony, the wicked took his head and hands and fixed them upon the Netherbow Port, with the fingers upward. 'One of his and Christ's declared enemies, when he looked at his head at Edinburgh, gave him this testimony, saying, 'There's the head and hands of a man who lived praying and preaching, and died praying and fighting.' And wherever the faithful contendings of the Covenanted Church of Scotland are made mention of, this, to his hounour, shall be recorded of him.' (Scots Wort).hies Herkless also states that 'it is of noteworthy significance . . . that for over two hundred years Cameron's name has been associated with a set of men marked by the strictest adherence to Calvinism, and by a genuine, even though severe, profession of piety. It was a remarkable testimony to their religious earnestness when Norman Macleod, referring to the parish of Loudoun, wrote: 'I am eagerly desirous to get family worship established -- of that there seems not to be a vestige, except among the Cameronians, and there every family has it.' In this testimony stands the name of Cameron, who, by the genuineness of his religion, his uncompromising devotion to principle, and the greatness of his cause, touched the nation and fixed himself in its memory.' Cameron was ordained at the hands of the exiled Robert MacWard and John Brown (of Wamphray), while in Holland. 'He and a group of supporters issued the Sanquhar Declaration, renouncing the authority of Charles II, and declaring war upon him as a tyrant and usurper. For this he was declared a traitor, and had a heavy price put on his head'." (Cameron, editor, Dictionary of Scottish Church History and Theology, p. 124) -- Publisher

    Herle, Charles (1598-1659), Davids Song of Three Parts: Delivered in a Sermon preached before the right Honorable the House of Lords, at the Abby-Church in Westminster, upon the 15. day of June, 1643. Being the day appointed for publike thanksgiving for Gods great deliverance of the Parliament, citie and kingdome, from the late most mischievous conspiracy against all three, Isaiah 33:11.

    Hetherington, William (1803-1865), History of the Church of Scotland From the Introduction of Christianity to the Period of the Disruption in 1834, 2 volumes. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #17.

    *Hewison, James King, The Covenanters: A History of the Church in Scotland From the Reformation to the Revolution, 1908, 2 volumes (1908). Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #25.
    "Smellie, in his preface to MEN OF THE COVENANT, calls this set a 'great treatise on the Covenanters -- a treatise which covers the entire field and seems to leave no word unsaid.' Hewison states that he desired to produce 'an absolutely impartial account of the Covenanters.' He also notes that 'certain definite conclusions regarding the Covenanters, as a rigid sect in the Christian Church, and as a restless, rebellious political party in the 16th and 17th centuries, have been arrived at by many students; and, as a general rule, a far from favourable estimate of these brave and defensible patriots has been based upon generalizations which will not bear investigation.' Moreover, he recognizes the Covenanters for who they were: 'one of the most extraordinary orders of devotees which the civilized world ever saw.' The work is enhanced by photographic reproductions of portraits, pictures, and Covenants. Considered by some as the definitive work on the Covenanters (over 1100 pages). If you are going to study church history after the Apostles, no other group or time period offers as much edifying material. This set is sure to put a fiery zeal in the soul of all those who love the Lord Jesus Christ. Great price too!" -- Publisher
    Hewison, The Covenanters: A History of the Church in Scotland From the Reformation to the Revolution, vol. 1 of 2.
    http://archive.org/details/covenantershisto01hewi
    Hewison, The Covenanters: A History of the Church in Scotland From the Reformation to the Revolution, vol. 2 of 2.
    http://archive.org/details/covenantershisto02hewi

    Hooker, Thomas, 1586-1647, The Faithful Covenanter: A Sermon Preached at the Lecture in Dedham in Essex . . . Very Usefull in These Times of Covenanting With God, 1644.

    Horne, A. Sinclair, Torchbearers of the Truth: Sketches of the Scottish Covenanters, ISBN: 0950031909 9780950031903.

    Houston, Thomas (1803-1882), The Christian Magistrate, 1832. Available in WORKS: DOCTRINAL AND PRACTICAL, 4 volumes.

    Houston, Thomas (1803-1882), The Covenanter's Narrative and Plea: Exhibiting the Error, Schism, Radicalism, and Slander of Dr. Paul and Other Separatists From the Reformed Presbyterian Church. Alternate title: NARRATIVE OF COVENANTING.

    Houston, Thomas (1803-1882), Letters of the Rev. James Renwick, The Last of Scotland's Covenanted Martyrs, 1865, 290 pages. Available (LETTERS OF THE REV. JAMES RENWICK), on Reformation Bookshelf CD #21.
    "Contains a historical sketch of Renwick's life, labours, and martyrdom, and a vindication of his character and testimony -- along with 63 of his letters (from July 8, 1682 to Feb. 17, 1688). A useful appendix is also included denouncing the Revolution settlement and rebuking 'those who have no relish for a full covenanted testimony.' Because of the severity of Renwick's and the 'Society people's' suffering, and the wickedness of the slander and persecution they endured (which is beginning to be repeated in our day through the likes of men like Richard Bacon and other unfaithful ministers and malicious malignants), this book makes for excellent 'spiritual support and consolation in difficult times.' We also happily note, along with Houston, that 'the resurrection of the names of the confessors and martyrs of a former age, is a sure indication of the resurrection of their principles too' -- as we see God stretching forth his hand to our wicked and sinful generation in the writings of faithful covenanted ministers like James Renwick (and many others)." -- Publisher
    The Life of Mr. James Renwick, excerpted from Biographia Scoticana, John Howie
    http://www.truecovenanter.com/bio/howie_bios_renwick_james.html

    Houston, Thomas (1803-1882), The Life of James Renwick: A Historical Sketch of his Life, Labours and Martyrdom and a Vindication of his Character and Testimony. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available (THE LIFE OF THE REV. JAMES RENWICK), on Reformation Bookshelf CD #26.
    The Life of Mr. James Renwick, excerpted from Biographia Scoticana, John Howie
    http://www.truecovenanter.com/bio/howie_bios_renwick_james.html
    The Life of James Renwick: A Faithful Covenanter, Cameronian, Martyr for Christ, #1
    http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?SID=819077439

    Houston, Thomas (1803-1882), A Memorial of Covenanting. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #27. Also available in WORKS (of Thomas Houston), DOCTRINAL AND PRACTICAL, volume 3.

    Houston, Thomas (1803-1882), Zion's Light Come: An Encouragement to Holy Effort; A Discourse Delivered at the Opening of the Reformed Presbyterian Synod in Ireland, on Monday Evening, July 10, 1854.

    Howie, John (1735-1793, compiler), John Kid, et al., A Collection of Very Valuable Sermons, Preached on Several Subjects and in Divers Places in the Time of the Late Persecution [in Scotland], by John Kid, John King, John Welch . . . [et al.], 1780.

    *Howie, John (1735-1793, collector and transcriber), Michael Shields, James Guthrie, John Kid, John King, et al., Faithful Contendings Displayed: Being an Historical Relation of the State and Actings of the Suffering Remnant in the Church of Scotland Subsisted in Select Societies, and Were United in General Correspondencies During the Hottest Time of the Late Persecution, viz. From the Year 1681 to 1691: Together with an account of the State of the land in general, and of the society people in particular, in the intervals betwixt each of their general meetings, with some pertinent remarks upon these historical occurrences, and many letters to and from the general correspondent meetings, 1780, ISBN: 1171237324 9781171237327 0548345945 9780548345948. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
    The long title continues: "Collected and kept in record by Mr. Michael Shields, who was clerk unto these general societies, and personally present at most of their meetings. To which is added, ten considerations on the danger of apostacy and defection from a covenanted work of reformation. By Mr. James Guthrie, sometime minister of the Gospel at Stirling. As also, a collection of very valuable sermons, preached by these faithful and eminent servants of Jesus Christ, Messrs. John Kid, John King, John Welch, John Blackadder, John Dickson, and Gabriel Semple. Collected and transcribed by John Howie, and published at the desire of some of those who desire to own the same testimony that some of those authors owned and sealed with their blood." -- long title continued
    "Howie is famous for his BIOGRAPHIA SCOTICANA: OR, A BRIEF HISTORICAL ACCOUNT OF THE LIVES, CHARACTERS, AND MEMORABLE TRANSACTIONS OF THE MOST EMINENT SCOTS WORTHIES (often just called SCOTS WORTHIES), but this work is just as valuable. A massive, rare classic, in which Howie aims at 'the gaining of friends unto, or confirming them in the covenanted interest, in a subserviency to God's glory and the good of His church' (preface, p. xxiv). Contains much information on the Reformation and the sufferings of the Covenanters which is found nowhere else (to our knowledge)." -- Publisher

    *Howie, John (1735-1793), Reformation Principles, &c. Re-exhibited. A Collection; Containing I. The National Covenant and Solemn League and Covenant, With the Acknowledgement of Sins, and Engagement to Duties . . . II. Plain Reasons for Presbyterians Dissenting From the Revolution-Church in Scotland. As Also, Their Principles Concerning Civil Government, . . . now corrected and enlarged.

    *Howie, John (1735-1793), The Scots Worthies. Biographia Scoticana: or, A Brief Historical Account of the Lives, Characters, and Memorable Transactions of the Most Eminent Scots Worthies . . . as also, an Appendix, containing a short historical hint of the wicked lives . . . of the . . . apostates and . . . persecutors in Scotland . . . 2nd edition, corrected and enlarged, 1781. A Christian classic. Available (PDF and MP3 audio book files) on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available (PDF file) on Reformation Bookshelf CD #1, #10. The series of 22 MP3 audio book files, produced by Still Waters Revival Books, are available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #1-30 and at AudioSermons.com.
    "Most commonly known as SCOTS WORTHIES, this edition contains Howie's footnotes (defending the Covenanters), and Howie's appendix titled 'The Judgment and Justice of God' (which chronicles God's judgments upon Reformation apostates and those who persecuted the Covenanters). It is the only edition in print which contains both these sections intended for publication by the author (as later editors often removed either one or both of these parts of this book). BIOGRAPHIA SCOTICANA covers the history of 'noblemen, gentlemen, ministers and others from Mr. Patrick Hamilton, who was born about the year of our Lord 1503, and suffered martyrdom at St. Andrews, Feb., 1527, to Mr. James Renwick, who was executed in the Grass-market of Edinburgh, Feb. 17, 1688. Together with a succinct account of the lives of other seven eminent divines, and Sir Robert Hamilton of Preston, who died about, or shortly after the Revolution.' This is one of our best history books (over 700 pages), covering all of the major Scottish Reformers. Howie summarizes his book as follows: 'The design of the following was to collect, from the best authorities, a summary account of the lives, characters, and contendings, of a certain number of our most renowned SCOTS WORTHIES, who, for their faithful services, ardent zeal, constancy in sufferings, and other Christian graces and virtues, deserve honourable memorial in the Church of Christ; and for which their names have been, and will be savoury to all the true lovers of our Zion, while Reformation principles are regarded.' Furthermore, the momentous nature of the struggles chronicled in this book are succinctly noted when Howie writes: 'the primitive witnesses had the divinity of the Son of God, and an open confession of Him, for their testimony. Our reformers from Popery had Antichrist to struggle with, in asserting the doctrines of the Gospel, and the right way of salvation in and through Jesus Christ. Again, in the reigns of James VI. and Charles I., Christ's REGALIA, and the divine right of Presbytery, became the subject matter of their testimony. Then, in the beginning of the reign of Charles II. (until he got the whole of our ancient and laudable constitution effaced and overturned), our Worthies only saw it their duty to hold and contend for what they had already attained unto. But, in the end of this and the subsequent tyrant's reign, they found it their duty (a duty which they had too long neglected), to advance one step higher, by casting off their authority altogether, and that as well on account of their manifest usurpation of Christ's crown and dignity, as on account of their treachery, bloodshed, and tyranny . . . which may be summed up. The Primitive martyrs sealed the prophetic office of Christ in opposition to Pagan idolatry. The reforming martyrs sealed His priestly office with their blood, in opposition to Popish idolatry. And last of all, our late martyrs have sealed His kingly office with their best blood, in despite of supremacy and bold Erastianism. They indeed have cemented it upon His royal head, so that to the world's end it shall never drop off again.' Moreover, the importance of this book can be clearly seen when Johnston, in TREASURY OF THE SCOTTISH COVENANT, reports that, Walter Scott refers to Howie as 'the fine old chronicler of the Cameronians'. . . Howie's book has been for upwards of a century a household word, occupying a place on the shelf beside THE BIBLE and THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS.' Written for God, country and the covenanted work of Reformation. Stirring history!" -- Publisher
    Biographia Scoticana, John Howie
    Original from Oxford University, published 1885, digitized May 22, 2006. Described as a reprint of the 1781 edition. It does not appear to include the appendix cited above.
    http://books.google.com/books?vid=OCLC34190563&id=5iwAAAAAQAAJ&q=Scots+Worthies+1781&dq=Scots+Worthies+1781&ie=ISO-8859-1&pgis=1
    See also: A CLOUD OF WITNESSES FOR THE ROYAL PREROGATIVES OF JESUS CHRIST BEING THE LAST SPEECHES AND TESTIMONIES OF THOSE WHO HAVE SUFFERED FOR THE TRUTH IN SCOTLAND SINCE . . . 1680 and JOHN FOXE'S BOOK OF MARTYRS. ACTES AND MONUMENTS OF MATTERS MOST SPECIALL AND MEMORABLE. Available from: http://www.johnfoxe.org. Implemented by the Humanities Research Institute, University of Sheffield, England, and published by HRI Online Publications, Sheffield, 2011, Version 2.0, ISBN: 9780954260864.

    Howie, John (1735-1793), James Stewart and John Knox: Scotland's "Two Sons of Oil" (excerpted from John Howie's Scots Worthies, 1781 edition, narrated by Larry Birger, Jr.). Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #1.
    "As Birger accurately observes in his introduction to this one-tape reformational powerhouse, 'One great reason the Church is so weak and divided today is precisely because she has rejected these commandments of her Lord and Husband [to walk in the footsteps of the flock (Song of Solomon 1:8), and to seek out and walk in the old paths (Jer. 6:16 [[Jeremiah 6:16]])]. Forgetting the works of God in history, she has thus become an easy prey to the old lies and idolatries of the Roman Catholic Church, that whore of Babylon, such that so-called Protestantism today in many ways bears more resemblance to the Roman Church than to the biblical churches of the Reformation. We are indeed ignorant of our history, and therefore have been doomed time and again to repeat its mistakes.' He continues, pointing to one of God's powerful remedies for our sinful failings in this area: Our gracious Lord has nonetheless provided a way out for us, by preserving for us the narratives of His great works in history, as well as His infallible Word by which to judge which are truly the good old paths. . . . On this tape you'll hear of the lives of two men who exemplified the work of Christ's "Two Witnesses" in Scotland, James Stewart, Earl of Moray, and John Knox. These "Two Sons of Oil," like their ancient predecessors, Zerubbabel and Joshua, illustrate the holy beauty and mighty effectiveness of God's institutions of Scriptural civil magistracy and gospel ministry. We see from their high regard for one another and from the work they accomplished in the Lord how both righteous civil rulers and faithful gospel ministers are necessary for true and lasting, society-changing reformation. In our age of ungodly toleration and pretended liberty of conscience (as opposed to the true Scriptural liberty of conscience promoted by these two eminent reformers), the emphasis is generally laid upon the ministry only as the agent of reformation -- and truly, there will be no lasting reformation without a faithful ministry. Nevertheless, we see from the Scriptural examples of Hezekiah, Josiah, and other godly rulers, as well as from various instances throughout subsequent history that the civil rulers are called by, and used by, God to promote and protect the welfare of His Bride, the Church. These rulers have no authority in matters of religion, but they have a responsibility about matters of religion -- to do things like suppressing and uprooting heresy, blasphemy, and idolatry, and encouraging and promoting faithful ministers -- as all our faithful Reformed forefathers taught.' Learn with excitement how God used these two faithful men to defeat Antichrist in Scotland, and purify and unify His faithful Church there. A great tool for seeing the vital importance of the civil government (as well as the ministry), in reformation!" -- Publisher
    James Stewart and John Knox: Scotland's "Two Sons of Oil" (excerpted from John Howie's Scots Worthies, 1781 ed., narrated by Larry Birger, Jr.)
    John Knox and James Stewart: Scotland's Two Sons of Oil by John Howie, free audio (MP3).
    http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?sermonid=122501142339

    Hewart, Kirkwood, Makers of the Scottish Church at the Reformation, 1920.

    Hewart, Kirkwood, Peden the Prophet: Being Some Account of the Life and Times of Alexander Peden, Minister of New Luce From 1660 to 1663, and Afterwards of God's Persecuted People in the Fields, 1911.

    Knox, John (1505-1572), John Knox Debates Theonomy, Idolatry and Civil Resistance in the General Assembly of 1564. Available (singly or in WORKS OF JOHN KNOX on the Puritan Hard Drive. The full printed version of this text is free online. "Excerpted from Knox's THE HISTORY OF THE REFORMATION IN SCOTLAND, BOOK IV. From THE WORKS OF JOHN KNOX, VOLUME 2, pages 425-461, collected and edited by David Laing, 1854."
    " 'Perhaps the most thoroughgoing Calvinist,' writes W. Stanford Reid in (Christian History, Vol. 5, No. 4), 'who took the teacher's (Calvin -- RB), ideas to their logical conclusions, was the Scot, John Knox.' This debate is a perfect example of Knox's consistent Calvinism. In fact one wonders about a person's claim to consistent Calvinism at all if he denies the sovereignty of God in the civil arena (i.e. by denying the applicability of the first table of the law, especially the first two commandments, to the realm of the civil magistrate -- along with their penal sanctions as displayed in the Judicial laws of the Old Testament). Knox certainly did not shrink back from the binding nature of the law on these points. He even openly proclaimed, in this debate, that the death penalty should be carried out against idolaters -- and this was in the context of debating the Queen's Mass and her favoring the idolatry of Romanism. With boldness like this, it is easy to see why it was said over Knox's open grave, 'here lies a man who neither flattered nor feared any flesh.' This debate shows conclusively that Knox was a theonomist, in the sense that he believed in the continuing binding validity of OT penal sanctions. Moreover it demonstrates that it is the duty of all ministers to preach that the civil magistrate is bound to uphold the law of God and promote and protect only the one true Reformed religion. Furthermore Knox argued, from the OT, that to tolerate public idolatry is to disobey God and bring a curse upon the land. Though Knox's REFORMATION, REVOLUTION AND ROMANISM is his most important political writing, this debate displays the very same principles, as Knox applied them in 'the heat of battle,' against the queen's secretary, William Maitland of Lethington. This particular debate, as well as many other large sections, are edited out of THE HISTORY OF THE REFORMATION IN SCOTLAND as presently reprinted by The Banner of Truth Trust. However, this debate can also be found in the bound photocopy edition of volume 2 of KNOX'S WORKS or, with contemporary spelling and punctuation, in ON REBELLION (Cambridge Univ. Press, 1994, see page XX in this catalogue). Reid TRUMPETER OF GOD, pp. 234-235, notes that 'the implications of this debate were far reaching' and that 'as far as Knox personally was concerned, this debate also marked a turning point in his career.' Also of great importance was the situation that occurred 'when Maitland quoted Luther, Musculus, Calvin, and others to support the requirement of absolute obedience, Knox replied that they either spoke in a situation in which they had no power to resist the ruler or they were refuting arguments of Anabaptists who rejected all civil government. Unfaithful rulers could therefore be removed by the people if they had the power to do so. In this position he was supported by John Craig, his colleague in St. Giles, and by most, although not all, of the other ministers.' (Reid, Trumpeter of God, p. 234). As present civil governments continue to promote defiance of the laws of 'the Prince of the kings of the Earth,' our great King the Lord Jesus Christ, these arguments will become more and more useful, among those who seek to obey the Lord in all matters." -- Publisher
    Reformation, Revolution and Romanism (1558), John Knox
    "This has been called John Knox's most important political writing. It also deals with Romanism, God's law and much more. "
    http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?currSection=sermonssource&sermonID=1030075041

    Lilburne, John, Bridgewater House Library, Regall Tyrannie Discovered: or, A discourse, shewing that all lawfull (approbational) instituted power by God amongst men, is by common agreement, and mutual consent: . . . In which is also punctually declared, the tyrannie of the kings of England, from the dayes of William the invader and robber, and tyrant, alias the Conqueror, to this present King Charles, . . . Out of which is drawn a discourse, occasioned by the tyrannie and injustice inflicted by the Lords, upon that stout-faithful-lover of his country, and constant sufferer for the liberties thereof, Lieut. Col. John Lilburn, now prisoner in the Tower. . . .

    *Mitchell, Alexander F. (1822-1899), The Scottish Reformation: Its Epochs, Episodes, Leaders, and Distinctive Characteristics. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #1.
    "David Hay Fleming (editor) who states that 'the present volume is valuable in several ways, not the least of these being that it embodies, on many obscure and important points, the matured views of one of the most competent and cautious of historical students -- one who grudged no time and spared no labour in eliciting and elucidating the truth.' Contains a biographical sketch of the author by James Christie. Hits all the high points of Reformational development in Scotland, including Hamilton, Wishart, Knox, the 1560 Confession, the First and Second Books of Discipline, etc." -- Publisher

    *Hurst, Henry, Whether Well-composed Religious Vows do not Exceedingly Promote Religion, 1661. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #27.
    "A Puritan sermon on a much neglected means to spiritual victory, ecclesiastical revival, and national reformation." -- Publisher

    *Hutchison, Matthew, The Reformed Presbyterian Church in Scotland: Its Origin and History, 1680-1876, 450 pages. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #18.
    "This is the only book-length history covering the period after 1680 (to 1876), when the majority Synod of the Reformed Presbyterian Church of Scotland merged with the Free Church of Scotland. The history after 1822, when the Auchensaugh Renovation was removed as a term of communion, merely chronicles the wholesale backsliding of the church and eventual split in 1863; from which a majority emerged which joined with the Free Church of Scotland in 1876. A remnant of the minority of the Reformed Presbyterian Church of Scotland still exists, however they never returned to the original position of the church from which it began to depart in 1822 (with the removal of the Auchensaugh bond -- which bond is the Auchensaugh Renovation listed under the Reformed Presbytery in this catalogue). This book is a fine illustration of the 'footsteps of the flock,' (as seen in the Protesters [paleopresbyterians] and their spiritual posterity), during the period of which it deals, while at the same time serving as a clear warning to those who have declined from Reformation attainments (i.e. the Resolutioners [neopresbyterians] and those who continue their deformation of the faith). 'By the National Covenant,' notes Thomas Sproull, 'our Fathers laid Popery prostrate. By the Solemn League and Covenant they were successful in resisting prelatic encroachments and civil tyranny. By it they were enabled to achieve the Second Reformation . . . They were setting up landmarks by which the location and limits of the city of God will be known at the dawn of the millennial day . . . How can they be said to go forth by the footsteps of the flock, who have declined from the attainments, renounced the covenants and contradicted the testimony of 'the cloud of witnesses.'. . . All the schisms (separations) that disfigure the body mystical of Christ . . . are the legitimate consequences of the abandonment of reformation attainments -- the violation of covenant engagements.' Understanding where the faithful covenanted servants of Christ have been historically, not only helps individuals to separate between truly constituted churches and the those that are false (because they have constitutionally backslidden from Reformation attainments); but is a necessary component to the keeping the fifth commandment, as the Reformed Presbytery has pointed out: ' Nor otherwise can a Christian know the time or place of his birth, or the persons whom God commands him to honor as his father and mother, than by uninspired testimony; and the same is true of his covenant obligation, if baptized in infancy. Against all who ignorantly or recklessly reject or oppose history as a bond of fellowship, in the family, in the state, but especially in the church, we thus enter our solemn and uncompromising protest.' (excerpted from: The Act, Declaration and Testimony for the Whole of Our Covenanted Reformation . . . by the Reformed Presbytery, pp. 177-178 -- a SWRB rare bound photocopy [1761], reprinted 1995 from the 1876 edition). This edition of THE REFORMED PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN SCOTLAND: ITS ORIGIN AND HISTORY, 1680-1876 also contains an introductory note by William Goold (the editor of John Owen's WORKS). In introducing this book Goold writes, 'This volume may claim attention as supplying an essential link in the ecclesiastical history of Scotland. It is the history of that body of men who adhered to the civil part of the Second Reformation, according to which Presbytery was established and recognized by the State between 1638 and 1649 . . . The Church of which this volume is a history took its rise in its distinctive character at this period, and on the ground that it could not, while acknowledging the relief from oppression which the Revolution (of 1688), afforded, acquiesce in the arrangements made by the State for the recognition of the Church and the due exercise of its authority within its own spiritual domain (because the so-called 'glorious revolution' was Erastian to the core and also denied the previous national covenant engagements -- RB). . . . Apart, however, from their testimony in regard to this evil and danger, resulting from a Civil Government in which Prelacy was continued as an essential element, those who dissented from the Revolution Settlement, and from whom the Reformed Presbyterian Church arose, were animated with an earnest zeal for the maintenance of religious ordinances. They strove to exist as a Church, and how far they succeeded, and what difficulties they had to surmount in the attempt, is the interesting story recorded in this volume' (pp. v-vi). In summary, this book (of 450 pages), is an one-of-a-kind chronicle of an integral part of the history of the battle for the 'Crown Rights and Royal Prerogatives of the Lord Jesus Christ'." -- Publisher

    *Johnston (of Wariston), Archibald, Diary of Sir Archibald Johnston of Wariston, 3 volumes. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
    "The introduction to this book cites Carlyle writing, 'Archibald Johnston of Wariston; . . . a Lord Register of whom all the world had heard. Redactor of the Covenanters' protests in 1637 and onwards; redactor perhaps of the Covenant itself; canny lynx-eyed Lawyer, and austere Presbyterian Zealot; full of fire, of heavy energy and gloom: in fact a very notable character.' The introduction further notes that Johnston was 'in some respects, one of the most interesting of the leading Scotsmen who lived in those troubled times which began with the Service Book riot, the swearing and subscription of the National Covenant, and the abjuration of Episcopacy in 1637-38, and ended with the overthrow of the Protectorate and the Restoration of the Monarchy in 1660 . . .' Calling Johnston the 'Covenanter politician,' the DICTIONARY OF SCOTTISH CHURCH HISTORY AND THEOLOGY states, 'From the start of the revolt against Charles I in 1637 he was at its centre, frequently acting as secretary to the rebel leaders and drafting their declarations. He and Alexander Henderson were joint authors of the National Covenant, and he frequently took part in negotiations with the King and the English Parliament in the years that followed. In 1638 he was appointed clerk to the General Assembly and procurator of the Church, and in 1641, he was knighted and appointed a Lord of Session. In 1643 he became one of Scotland's representatives at the Westminster Assembly, and in 1646 King's Advocate. He had from the start been identified with the most radical of the Covenanters, and in 1648 he helped inspire opposition to the Engagement. A leading figure in the Kirk Party regime of 1648-50, becoming Clerk Register in 1649, he was in the fore in demanding thorough purging and punishing of the ungodly in both Church and state. During the Cromwellian invasion of 1650-1 he supported the Western Remonstrance and the Protesters in virtually disowning the cause of Charles II. He refused to serve the regime of Oliver Cromwell at first, partly through opposition of the religious toleration it imposed (though he later backslid into accepting major positions under Cromwell's dictatorship -- RB) . . . After the Restoration he was denounced as a traitor for having served Cromwell, and fled into hiding abroad. He was discovered in France, brought back to Edinburgh and executed . . . being generally hated and despised. Yet through his remarkable diaries one can gain much understanding.' (pp. 446-447). Johnston, TREASURY OF THE SCOTTISH COVENANT (pp. 404-405), provides us with more insight into this fascinating saint (and these unparalleled times), in the following two quotations. 'For the lay elders there was the redoubted Johnston of Warriston, the most able and zealous of a group of lay statesmen who were as thorough warriors in the ecclesiastical department of the great struggle as the clergy themselves . . . He looked at the Covenant as the setting of Christ on His throne, and so was out of measure zealous in it. He afterwards, in old age and physical weakness, sealed it with his blood, his last words being 'The Lord has graciously comforted me; O pray, pray; praise, praise' (Burton). 'Warriston was a religious statesman. The standard of his policy was the Word of God; his great and governing aim, the Divine glory. And on this account his name has suffered obloquy from a quarter where all who would follow his steps may expect similar treatment, so long as society is comprised, as it still is to such an alarming extent, of the godless and unbelieving' (Dr. M'Crie). The TREASURY OF THE SCOTTISH COVENANT also notes that 'it is to Johnston that the world generally has attributed the project of renewing the Covenant (of 1638 -- RB). This was his master-stroke of policy.' It further informs us that 'on one occasion he continued in prayer during fourteen hours.' For a glimpse into the heart of the most thorough national (and international), Reformation thus far in history you will not get closer to the source than Johnston's rare three volume Diary! From the inner workings of the battle for the National covenant to Johnston's notes covering Cromwell, Owen's views on toleration, the Protester/Resolutioner controversy and much more, this is an exceedingly valuable historical resource. As the introduction so aptly puts it, 'the great Covenanter's Diary . . . contained many valuable passages with relation to the history of these times, nowhere else to be found.' Almost 1300 pages in total and indexed." -- Publisher

    *Johnston, John C., Treasury of the Scottish Covenant. A Christian classic. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #27.
    "A massive listing (over 671 pages), covering Covenanting literature from the period of the Reformation to its publication in 1887. Contains not only the principal literary productions of the Covenanters (in the course of the long-sustained and heroic resistance offered by them to the spiritual despotism thrust against them in both church and state), but all of the chief historical documents connected with this period of history. Inspiration and courage can be drawn from the memories and associations of these events and writings. Here is one example of what you will find (from page 349 in the book): '(Richard) Camerons' head and hands, cut from his body at Airsmoss, were taken to his father, then suffering in prison in Edinburgh for the Covenant. He was asked if he knew them. 'His words,' says Dr. Kerr, 'were surely the most touching of all the memories of that cruel time: 'I know, I know them! they are my son's, my dear son's! It is the Lord: good is the will of the Lord, who cannot wrong me nor mine, but has made goodness and mercy to follow us all our days.' After which, by order of the Council, his head was fixed upon the Netherbow Port, and his hands beside it, with the fingers upward, a kind of preaching 'at the entry of the city, at the coming in at the doors,' that told more for his cause and against the persecutors than all the words he could have spoken.' A must for every serious theological student, religious library, or rare book collector who has any interest in Reformation thought and/or literature. It is a veritable gold mine of information, facts, documents, book listings and more!" -- Publisher
    Johnston, John C., Treasury of the Scottish Covenant
    http://archive.org/details/treasuryofscotti00john

    *Kerr, James (1847-1905, editor), The Covenants and the Covenanters: Covenants, Sermons, and Documents of the Covenanted Reformation. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #1.
    "The Reformed Presbytery (in 1879), has well noted the following incongruity that is still with us today, 'We heard from various quarters the cry, 'maintain the truth, stand up for the principles of the Second Reformation:' and yet many of those who are the most loud in uttering this cry, appear desirous to bury in oblivion those imperishable national and ecclesiastical deeds, by which the church and kingdom of Scotland became 'married to the Lord.' (A Short Vindication of Our Covenanted Reformation, p. 20). This book should go a long way to remedying the above noted ignorance and hypocrisy among those who now call upon the name of the Lord especially those who claim a Reformation heritage and are still open to further growth as it spells out in no uncertain terms what lay at the heart of the Second Reformation. Moreover, these covenants (landmarks of the Lord), stand as beacons to all nations of their continuing moral duty to bind themselves to Christ (First Commandment), or suffer His avenging wrath (Ps. 2 [Psalm 2]). And make no mistake about it, the Lord will utterly destroy all those who quarrel with His covenant bonds, whether individuals, churches or nations the mystery of iniquity will fall! The prefatory note to this magnificent volume well describes its value: The Covenants, Sermons, and Papers in this volume carry the readers back to some of the brightest periods in Scottish history. They mark important events in that great struggle by which these three kingdoms (England, Scotland and Ireland -- RB), were emancipated from the despotisms of Pope, Prince, and Prelate, and an inheritance of liberty secured for these Islands of the Sea. The whole achievements of the heroes of the battlefields are comprehended under that phrase of Reformers and Martyrs, 'The Covenanted Work of Reformation.' The attainments of those stirring times were bound together by the Covenants, as by rings of gold. The Sermons here were the product of the ripe thought of the main actors in the various scenes -- men of piety, learning, and renown. Hence, the nature, objects , and benefits of personal and national Covenanting are exhibited in a manner fitted to attract to that ordinance the minds and hearts of men. The readers can well believe the statements of Livingstone, who was present at several ceremonies of covenant-renovation: 'I never saw such motions from the Spirit of God. I have seen more than a thousand persons all at once lifting up their hands, and the tears falling down from their eyes.' In the presence of the defences of the Covenants as deeds, by these preachers, the baseless aspersions of novelists and theologians fade out into oblivion. True Christians must, as they ponder these productions, be convinced that the Covenanters were men of intepreachers, the baseless aspersions of novelists and theologians fade out into oblivion. True Christians must, as they ponder these productions, be convinced that the Covenanters were men of intense faith and seraphic fervour, and their own hearts will burn as they catch the heavenly flame. Members of the Church of Christ will be stirred to nobler efforts for the Kingdom of their Lord as they meditate on the heroism of those who were the 'chariots of Israel and the horsemen thereof;' and they will behold with wonder that 'to the woman were given two wings of And Statesman will discover how princes, parliaments, and peoples united in the hearty surrender of themselves to the Prince of the kings and kingdoms of the earth; and will be aroused to promote that policy of Christian Statesmanship which, illustrating the purpose and will of God, the Father, shall liberate Parliaments and nations from the bonds of false religions, and assert for them those liberties and honours which spring from the enthronement of the Son of man, and King of kings and Lord of lords. This volume of documents of olden times is sent out on a mission of Revival of Religion, personal and national, in the present times. It would do a noble work if it helped to humble classes and masses, and led them to return as one man to that God in covenant from Whom all have gone so far away. A national movement, in penitence and faith, for the repeal of the Acts Recissory and the recognition of the National Covenants would be as life from the dead throughout the British Empire. The people and rulers of these dominions shall yet behold the brilliancy of the Redeemer's crowns; and shall, by universal consent, exalt Him who rules in imperial majesty over the entire universe of God. For, 'The seventh angel sounded, and there were great voices in heaven, saying, The kingdoms of this world are become the Kingdoms of our Lord and of His Christ.' Here we have some of the most moving sermons ever addressed to a people and their nations, given before the most solemn of occasions national covenant renewal! Alexander Henderson, Andrew Cant, Joseph Caryl, Edmond Calamy and a host of other Puritan Covenanters (even the turncoat Independent Philip Nye), are included here in easy to read modern (1895), type. Anyone interested in seeing the royal prerogatives of King Jesus once again trumpeted throughout the nations, on a national and international scale, needs this book for these men 'were setting up landmarks by which the city of God will be known at the dawn of the millennial day'." (Thomas Sproull cited in the Reformed Presbytery's Short Vindication, p. 38) -- Publisher
    The Covenants and the Covenanters: Covenants, Sermons, and Documents of the Covenanted Reformation. Introd. on the National Covenants by James Kerr (1895)
    http://archive.org/details/covenantscovenan00kerr
    The Covenants and the Covenanters
    Project Gutenberg free e-text online.
    http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/19100
    The Covenants and the Covenanters: Covenants, Sermons and Documents of the Covenanted Reformation. Introd. on the National Covenants
    http://books.google.com/books?id=nrdKAAAAMAAJ&ie=ISO-8859-1&output=html

    *Knox, John (1505-1572), National Repentance and Reformation. Alternate title: A BRIEF EXHORTATION TO ENGLAND FOR THE SPEEDY EMBRACING OF THE GOSPEL, 1559. Available in THE WORKS OF JOHN KNOX. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #25.
    "Formerly titled A BRIEF EXHORTATION TO ENGLAND FOR THE SPEEDY EMBRACING OF THE GOSPEL, 1559. Mitchell in The Scottish Reformation (p. 80), cites Dr. Merle D'Aubigné on Knox: 'The blood of warriors ran in the veins of the man who was to become one of the most intrepid champions of Christ's army . . . He was active, bold, thoroughly upright and perfectly honest, diligent in his duties, and full of heartiness for his comrades.' The warrior in Knox was certainly roused for battle in this production. Kevin Reed in SELECTED WRITINGS OF JOHN KNOX, p. 580, comments, 'Some historians have reflected negatively on the vehemence of Knox's remarks. Perhaps they should peruse the long list of the martyrs named in the appendix to this work. Critics may then find a clue for understanding the reformer's zeal. Knox is discussing serious matters of life and death -- spiritual issues which affect us deeply in this life, and for eternity.' Magistrates everywhere today need to hear this message again; God has not changed -- there are still corporate curses for disobedience at a national level and corporate blessings for those nations 'that kiss the Son' (cf. Psalm 2)." -- Publisher

    *Knox, John (1505-1572), Appellation From the Sentence Pronounced by the Bishops and Clergy: Addressed to the Nobility and Estates of Scotland. Alternate title: THE APPELLATION OF JOHN KNOX FROM THE CRUELL . . . SENTENCE PRONOUNCED AGAINST HIM BY THE FALSE BISHOPPES AND CLERGEY OF SCOTLAND, WITH HIS SUPPLICATION AND EXHORTATION TO THE NOBILITIE, ESTATES, AND COMMUNALTIE OF THE SAME REALME, and THE APPELLATION . . . TO THE SCOTTISH NOBILITY, and REFORMATION, REVOLUTION AND ROMANISM: AN APPEAL TO THE SCOTTISH NOBILITY, and THE APPELLATION FROM THE SENTENCE PRONOUNCED BY THE BISHOPS AND CLERGY: ADDRESSED TO THE NOBILITY AND ESTATES OF SCOTLAND, and THE APPELLATION. Cover title: REFORMATION, REVOLUTION AND ROMANISM: APPEAL TO THE SCOTTISH NOBILITY (1558). Available (singly as REFORMATION, REVOLUTION AND ROMANISM, in which key text have been underlined by a previous reader), on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available (REFORMATION, REVOLUTION AND ROMANISM), on Reformation Bookshelf CD #1 (MP3), #26. Available (APPELLATION FROM THE SENTENCE PRONOUNCED BY THE BISHOPS AND CLERGY: ADDRESSED TO THE NOBILITY AND ESTATES OF SCOTLAND), on the Library of Presbyterian Heritage Publications and Protestant Heritage Press CD-ROM Library. Available (APPELLATION FROM THE SENTENCE PRONOUNCED BY THE BISHOPS AND CLERGY: ADDRESSED TO THE NOBILITY AND ESTATES OF SCOTLAND), in THE WORKS OF JOHN KNOX, Vol. 4. [John Knox; David Laing ((collector and editor)), THE WORKS OF JOHN KNOX, Vol. 4, reprint of the 1855 edition printed for Bannatyne Club, Edinburgh (New York: AMS Press, 1966)].
    "David Chilton notes, 'Of all the sixteenth-century Reformers, John Knox remains the most ardently loved and fiercely hated. No other leader of his day saw so clearly the political issues in the light of Scripture. Nor has any of his contemporaries had so much direct influence upon the subsequent history of the world. He transformed a land of barbarians into one of the most hardheadly Calvinistic cultures ever to exist, and his doctrines lie at the core of all Protestant revolutionary activity. While he is often considered merely one of Calvin's lieutenants, he was actually a Reformer in his own right. In some respects he was the greatest of them all.' ("John Knox," in The Journal of Christian Reconstruction: Symposium on Puritanism and Law [Vallecito, CA: Chalcedon], Vol. V, No. 2, Winter, 1978-79, p. 194).
    "Furthermore, R.L. Greaves has noted that 'it has even been suggested -- and not altogether without merit -- that Knox was a key link in the development of political ideology that culminated in the American Revolution.' (Theology and Revolution in the Scottish Reformation: Studies in the Thought of John Knox [Grand Rapids, MI: Christian University Press, 1980], p. 156)
    "Moreover, Mason [Roger A. Mason -- compiler], states that this APPEAL [APPELLATION FROM THE SENTENCE PRONOUNCED BY THE BISHOPS AND CLERGY: ADDRESSED TO THE NOBILITY AND ESTATES OF SCOTLAND -- compiler], 'is the most important . . . of Knox's political writings' (in the Introduction to his compilation of Knox's political writings entitled KNOX: ON REBELLION). [see annotation for KNOX: ON REBELLION elsewhere in this bibliography -- compiler]. It shows in a conclusive manner that Knox wanted a Theonomic Establishment which was careful to 'disapprove, detest, oppose and remove all false worship and all monuments of idolatry' (cf. Westminster Larger Catechism, #108). It also clearly demonstrates that Knox believed in and promoted the continuing binding validity of the Old Testament case laws and the penal sanctions attached to them, including the death penalty.
    "Kevin Reed, in a editor's note, introducing this piece in his newly published SELECTED WRITING OF JOHN KNOX [Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. -- compiler], also points out that 'the Westminster Confession provides a distinct echo of Knox, when it states that the magistrate ""hath authority, and it is his duty, to take order, that unity and peace be preserved in the church, that the truth of God be kept pure and entire, that all blasphemies and heresies be suppressed, all corruptions and abuses in worship and discipline prevented or reformed, and all the ordinances of God duly settled, administered, and observed"" (Ch. 23:3, original wording). One secular historian once described Knox as 'Calvin with a sword,' making one wonder if he had not just been reading this very book. For 'where Calvin merely permitted disobedience to an ungodly ruler or immoral law, Knox championed armed rebellion -- a type of Calvinism that made religious revolution in Scotland possible.' (Christian History, Issue 46, p. 35). This is the best of the best; don't miss it!" -- Publisher
    Knox, John, Appellation From the Sentence Pronounced by the Bishops and Clergy: Addressed to the Nobility and Estates of Scotland
    This is a character scan (OCR) of the modernized text published by Protestant Heritage Press. While text may be cut and pasted it is subject to copyright.
    http://www.swrb.com/newslett/actualNLs/appellat.htm
    Knox, John (1505-1572), The Works of John Knox (1846), Vol. 4.
    http://archive.org/stream/worksjohnknox07laingoog#page/n4/mode/2up
    Reformation, Revolution and Romanism (1558), John Knox, MP3 file.
    "This has been called John Knox's most important political writing. It also deals with Romanism, God's law, and much more.
    http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?currSection=sermonssource&sermonID=1030075041
    See also:
    Goodman, Christopher (c. 1520-1603), HOW SUPERIOR POWERS OUGHT TO BE OBEYED OF THEIR SUBJECTS: AND WHEREIN THEY MAY LAWFULLY BY GOD'S WORD BE DISOBEYED AND RESISTED, 1558. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #26. Available (HOW SUPERIOR POWERS OUGHT TO BE OBEYED), on the Library of Presbyterian Heritage Publications and Protestant Heritage Press CD-ROM Library.
    "From 1555 to 1558, Christopher Goodman served as co-pastor, with John Knox, of the congregation of English exiles in Geneva. During the course of his ministry, Goodman preached upon Acts 4:19 and 5:29: 'Whether it be right in the sight of God, to obey you rather than God, judge ye. We ought rather to obey God than men'. . . . In this book, Goodman contends against both ecclesiastical and political tyranny." -- Publisher
    Goodman, Christopher (c. 1520-1603), How Superior Powers Ought to be Obeyed of Their Subjects
    http://www.constitution.org/cmt/goodman/obeyed.htm
    See also annotation for:
    Knox, John (1505-1572), THE HISTORY OF THE REFORMATION OF RELIGION WITHIN THE REALM OF SCOTLAND. . . . TOGETHER WITH THE LIFE OF THE AUTHOR, AND SEVERAL CURIOUS PIECES WROTE BY HIM, . . . BY THE REVEREND MR. JOHN KNOX, . . . TO WHICH IS ADDED, I. AN ADMONITION TO ENGLAND AND SCOTLAND . . . BY ANTONI GILBY. II. THE FIRST AND SECOND BOOKS OF DISCIPLINE, GLASGOW, 1761. Alternate title: THE HISTORIE OF THE REFORMATION OF THE CHURCH OF SCOTLAND CONTAINING FIVE BOOKS: TOGETHER WITH SOME TREATISES CONDUCING TO THE HISTORY. EDITED, WITH A LIFE OF KNOX AND A PREFACE, BY DAVID BUCHANAN. INCLUDES: "THE APPELLATION OF JOHN KNOX, FROM THE . . . SENTENCE PRONOUNCED AGAINST HIM (pp. 1-33); "THE ADMONITION OF JOHN KNOX TO HIS BELOVED BRETHREN THE COMMONALTY OF SCOTLAND" (pp. 34-42); "A FAITHFULL ADMONITION MADE BY JOHN KNOX TO THE TRUE PROFESSORS OF THE GOSPEL OF CHRIST WITHIN THE KINGDOM OF ENGLAND, 1554" (pp. 43-79); "THE COPIE OF A LETTER DELIVERED TO QUEEN MARY, REGENT OF SCOTLAND" (pp. 80-97); AND "A SERMON PREACHED BY JOHN KNOX [AUGUST 19, 1565]," ISBN: 0851513581 9780851513584. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #1.

    *Loane, Marcus L., Makers of Religious Freedom in the Seventeenth Century: Henderson, Rutherford, Bunyan, Baxter.
    "Students of church and state will appreciate this book because it narrates the vigorous struggle for religious freedom on the part of Alexander Henderson and Samuel Rutherford in Scotland, and John Bunyan and Richard Baxter in England." -- Cyril J. Barber

    M.A.C., A Sermon Preached on the XXX day of January 1703 at Edinburgh, by M.A.C.

    MacMillan, John (d. 1808), and James Renwick (1662-1688), A Collection of Letters, Consisting of Ninety-three: Sixty-one of Which Wrote by the Rev. Mr. James Renwick; The Remainder, by the Rev. Messrs. John Livingston, John Brown, John King, Donald Cargil, Richard Cameron, Alex. Pedan, and Alex. Shields. Also a few by Mr. Michael Shields, at the direction of the general correspondence: From the years 1663 to 1689 inclusive. Containing many remarkable occurrences hitherto unknown in that period. Wherein is discovered the true state of the Cause and Testimony at that time . . . (1764)
    http://archive.org/details/collectionoflett00macm

    Mall, Thomas (b. 1629 or 30), The Axe at the Root of Professors Miscarriages. In a Plain Detection of, and a Wholsome Caveat Against the Miscarriages Opposite to Faith in God. By Thomas Mall, Minister of the Gospel.

    MacLean, Isabelle McCall, The Scottish Covenanter Genealogical Index -- (1630-1712), ISBN: 9780595420407 0595420400.
    "This work evolved out of a love for my ancestors, one being John Whitelaw, the Covenanter Monkland Martyr, who was executed for his religious beliefs in Edinburgh, 1683. While searching for his records I came across reference to thousands of other Scottish Covenanters. This INDEX lists those Covenanters found in some books written about the period between 1630 and 1712. There are many, many more Covenanters, whose names need to be added to this work, and, God willing, I will do it.
    "The Covenanters were steadfast in their Presbyterian beliefs and refused to take an oath unto the King stating that he was the head of the church. They believed that Christ was the Head of the Church and their loyalty to this belief allowed them to lay their lives down for it. The Royalists and Dragoons, who were seeking to bring them into obedience to the King, relentlessly chased the Covenanters from glen to glen. This disregard for their civil rights was brutally carried out basically in the Lowlands of Scotland.8
    "Many of their records were destroyed along with their lives and their stories only live in family lore and books that were written about them. I have extracted some of their names and created The Scottish Covenanter Genealogical Index, which is by no means complete, but is a work in progress.
    About the Author: "I learned to love my Covenanter ancestors at the knees of my father, James McCall MacLean and my grandfather, Thomas McCall McLean. As many Covenanter records had been destroyed during the 'killing times' in Scotland, only scanty histories and some court records remained. What I found, I indexed for myself and for other family history researchers. You can contact the author at www.isabellemmaclean.com." -- Publisher

    Mall, Thomas (b. 1629 or 30), A Cloud of VVitnesses, or, The Sufferers Mirrour. Made up of the Swan-like-songs and Other Choice Passages of Several Martyrs and Confessors to the end of the Sixteenth Century, in their treatises, speeches, letters, prayers, &c. in their prisons, or exiles, at the bar or stake &c. / collected out of the ecclesiastical histories of Eusebius, Fox, Fuller, Clark, Petrie, Scotland, and Mr. Samuel Ward's Life of faith in death, &c. and alphabetically disposed by T.M., 1665.

    *Manton, Thomas (1620-1677), Covenanting With God Pressed. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #5.
    "Two sermons on Psalm 119:106 printed in vol. 8 of THE COMPLETE WORKS OF THOMAS MANTON."
    "Manton notes, 'remember the great quarrel that God hath against the Christian world and all the professors of his name is about his covenant and oath taken. What is the reason God doth visit Christendom with famines, pestilences, inundations, and wars? Because they do not stand to the oath of God that is upon them. Every professor of the name of Christ, he is supposed to be in covenant with God.' This book explains our duty to covenant with God and what that means. It also shows how the blessings and cursings of the covenant come upon individuals and nations." -- Publisher

    Manton, Thomas (1620-1677), David's Covenanting our Duty Also. Available (THE COMPLETE WORKS OF THOMAS MANTON and singly as two MP3 files), on the Puritan Hard Drive. Also available online in THE COMPLETE WORKS OF THOMAS MANTON.
    "Read by Elder Lyndon Dohms. Manton was a covenanted English Presbyterian (he swore the Solemn League and Covenant). He was also chosen to write the 'Epistle to the Reader' in the Westminster Confession of Faith (1646), (which speaks volumes as to his credibility among the preachers and scholars of his day). Sermons like this show us the great depth of the knowledge that was prevalent during the covenanting period, not only in Scotland, but in England also." -- Publisher

    Manton, Thomas (1620-1677), Liberty and Blessing in the Law of Christ. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #5.

    *Marshall, Walter (1628-1680), The Gospel-Mystery of Sanctification: Growing in Holiness by Living in Union With Christ, ISBN: 189277724X. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
    The Reformation Heritage Books edition is a reprint of the 1954 edition set by Oliphants and includes an introduction by Joel R. Beeke. Also includes the author's famous sermon on "The Doctrine of Justification Opened and Applied."
    See the WorldCat record for various foreign language editions.
    Other editions:
    Marshall, Walter, The Gospel-Mystery of Sanctification, ISBN: 1597520543 9781597520546.
    "This is by far the best book on the doctrine of Sanctification in print. It was originally written in the 17th century, but has been put into modern English with this edition. This book will help you better understand the Gospel and its power not only for our Justification, but our Sanctification as well." -- Reader's Comment
    Marshall, Walter, The Gospel-Mystery of Sanctification, ISBN: 1589600630 9781589600638.
    "Here you will read the most closely reasoned defense of scriptural sanctification to be found anywhere. . . . Fourteen directions are given to the reader, all perfected with the aim of explaining to sincere souls what sanctification is, what it is not, and how to attain a holy walk before God. . . ." -- Jay P. Green, Sr.
    Marshall, Walter, The Gospel-mystery of Sanctification, Opened, in Sundry Practical Directions: Suited Especially to the Case of Those who Labor Under the Guilt and Power of Indwelling Sin. To Which is Added a Sermon on Justification (1859)
    http://archive.org/details/gospelmysteryofs02mars

    *Mason, Archibald, Observations on the Public Covenants Betwixt God and the Church: A Discourse (1799). Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #27.
    Contents: Observations on the public covenants betwixt God and the church / Archibald Mason -- Paleopresbyterianism vs. neopresbyterianism / Michael Wagner -- Permanence of covenant obligation -- The preface and bibliography to the rare bound photocopy: obligation of social covenanting -- The binding nature of national covenants with God -- The Solemn League and Covenant -- Guide for studying the Westminster Confession, in suggested order of reading -- Terms of ministerial and Christian communion in the Reformed Presbyterian Church -- Corporate sanctification: holding fast the attainments of Reformation / John Brown -- What is a moral person? How God views the church and the nations / David Scott, John Cunningham, and George Smeaton -- A hind let loose / Alexander Shields -- Of separation from corrupt churches -- Old landmarks -- confession and testimony.
    Includes: What is a Moral Person? How God Views the Church and the Nations, David Scott, John Cunningham, and George Smeaton
    http://www.swrb.com/newslett/actualnls/moral.htm

    *McFeeters, J.C., Sketches of the Covenanters Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #1. A Christian classic.
    "Stirring accounts of sacrifice and martyrdom for the Reformed Faith that will bring tears to eyes of all but the backslidden. Follows the chain of events which gave Scotland two Reformations and a Revolution. Knox, the National Covenant, the Westminster Assembly, the Field Meetings, and much more is covered. The history of great battles for Christ and His royal rights are recounted in this moving history book. Sheds much light upon the warfare with the dragon for true liberty. One of our best history books, highly recommended!" -- Publisher
    Sketches of the Covenanters
    http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/13570

    *M'Crie (McCrie), Thomas (1772-1835), Brief View of the Evidence for the Exercise of Civil Authority About Religion. Available in STATEMENT OF THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THE PROFESSION OF THE REFORMED CHURCH OF SCOTLAND, AS ADOPTED BY SECEDERS, AND THE PROFESSION CONTAINED IN THE NEW TESTIMONY AND OTHER ACTS, LATELY ADOPTED BY THE GENERAL ASSOCIATE SYNOD, Section VII. A Christian classic. Considered to be among the ten greatest books in the English language. Available (STATEMENT OF THE DIFFERENCE), on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available (STATEMENT OF THE DIFFERENCE), on Reformation Bookshelf CD #25.
    "M'Crie published at Edinburgh in 1807 a helpful discussion of the biblical evidence for an obligation of nations and their civil rulers to give recognition to the true religion. His book is a protest against the church in which he was ordained, and which subsequently departed from the principles it had espoused: STATEMENT OF THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THE PROFESSION OF THE REFORMED CHURCH OF SCOTLAND, AS ADOPTED BY SECEDERS, AND THE PROFESSION CONTAINED IN THE NEW TESTIMONY AND OTHER ACTS, LATELY ADOPTED BY THE GENERAL ASSOCIATE SYNOD. It has often been regarded as the best presentation of the confessional point of view respecting a national acknowledgment of religion. Churches formed after M'Crie's death found their conflicts over church principles defined in his literary output." -- Publisher
    Brief View of the Evidence for the Exercise of Civil Authority About Religion
    http://www.westminsterconfession.org/a-godly-society/the-exercise-of-civil-authority-about-religion.php

    *M'Crie, Thomas (1772-1835), Statement of the Difference . . . Particularly on the Power of Civil Magistrates Respecting Religion, National Reformation, National Churches, and National Covenants, 1871. Alternate title: STATEMENT OF THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THE PROFESSION OF THE REFORMED CHURCH OF SCOTLAND, AS ADOPTED BY SECEDERS, AND THE PROFESSION CONTAINED IN THE NEW TESTIMONY AND OTHER ACTS LATELY ADOPTED BY THE GENERAL ASSOCIATE SYNOD. A Christian classic. Considered to be among the ten greatest books in the English language. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #25.
    " 'The ablest exposition in the English language of the Establishment Principle . . . Dr. (George) Smeaton describes the Statement as a masterly defense of the principles of establishments as Scripture truth: and the most complete vindication ever given to the world of the position occupied by the Reformed Church of Scotland, on the whole subject of national religion and the magistrates legitimate power in promoting it. 'The same thoroughness,' wrote the late Rev. D. Beaton, 'which gave such abiding value to his great biography of Knox, is shown in this, his less known work . . . Dr. McCrie in his STATEMENT shows that all the Confessions of the Protestant and Presbyterian Churches of the Reformation, both in Britain and on the Continent of Europe, held and maintained the Establishment Principle. 'These harmoniously agree,' he writes, 'in declaring as with one mouth that civil authority is not limited to the secular affairs of men, and that the public care and advancement of religion is a principle part of the official duty of magistrates.' He goes on to give extracts from THE CONFESSION OF HELVETIA; THE CONFESSION OF BOHEMIA; THE CONFESSION OF SAXONY; THE FRENCH CONFESSION; THE BELGIC OR DUTCH CONFESSION; THE CONFESSION OF THE ENGLISH CONGREGATION IN GENEVA; THE SCOTS CONFESSION AND THE WESTMINSTER CONFESSION OF FAITH (1646). 'Such is the harmony of doctrine in the Protestant churches on this head,' he remarks, 'expressed in their confessions and public formularies drawn from the Word of God; a harmony which deserves great attention, and from which none should rashly depart' (as cited in CHRIST'S KINGSHIP OVER THE NATIONS by C.J. Brown). Concerning the doctrine of national obedience to Christ, M'Crie demonstrates in the most convincing way that there are few doctrines 'of the practical kind, in which the best interests of mankind and the general state of religion in the world, are more deeply concerned, than in the right and wrong determination of this question.' Contains an excellent preface by George Smeaton. Considered one of the definitive works on Church/State relations, defending the historic Reformed position. An extremely rare and very expensive item if located as a rare book." -- Publisher
    Brief View of the Evidence for the Exercise of Civil Authority About Religion
    http://www.westminsterconfession.org/a-godly-society/the-exercise-of-civil-authority-about-religion.php

    M'Crie, Thomas (1772-1835), Hugh Miller, James Anderson, John Fleming, John Hutton Balfour (contributor), The Bass Rock: Its Civil and Ecclesiastic History . . . Geology . . . Martyrology . . , 1847, 575 pages.
    http://books.google.com/books?id=xJILAAAAYAAJ&ie=ISO-8859-1&output=html

    M'Ward, Robert, Case of the Accommodation Lately Proposed by the Bishop of Dumblane, to the Non-conforming Ministers Examined. Wherein also the antient Prostasia, Episcopus praeses, is considered; and the Solemn league and covenant occasionally vindicat. Together with a copy of the two letters . . . Also . . . an appendix. Available in THE WORKS OF ROBERT M'WARD on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #27.

    *Moore, Edwin Nisbet, Our Covenant Heritage: The Covenanters' Struggle for Unity in Truth as Revealed in the Memoir of James Nisbet (1667-1728), and Sermons of John Nevay (d. 1672), ISBN: 1857926188. Includes bibliographical references and index.
    "A new book, OUR COVENANT HERITAGE, examines the rise and fall of the Scottish Church. It rose when men placed the rights of God above the rights of man. It fell when men abandoned unity in truth. It is written by Ed Moore, who spent several years examining why the Covenanters, particularly those who lived near Loudoun Castle, were willing to die for their understanding of God's truth. The answer is found in the sermons of their minister John Nevay on God's Covenant of Grace and in the Memoirs of James Nisbet, one of their number who survived their epic battle for truth only to face the age-old struggle of Christ's church for unity in truth." -- Publisher
    Our Covenant Heritage, Edwin Nisbet Moore
    http://www.covenanters.com/

    Morrill, John (editor), Reactions to the English Civil War, 1642-1649, ISBN: 0333275659 9780333275658 0333275667 9780333275665.

    Palmer, Herbert, Scripture and Reason Pleaded for Defensive Arms, 1643. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
    "Herbert Palmer was a member of the Westminster Assembly. According to Thomas Smith in the book SELECT MEMOIRS OF THE LIVES, LABOURS, AND SUFFERINGS, OF THOSE PIOUS AND LEARNED ENGLISH AND SCOTTISH DIVINES . . . Palmer 'was for a presbyterian form of church government.' (p. 583). He became master of Queen's college, Cambridge, in 1644, and he knew the value of good books.
    "He endeavoured, by all means, to have the college library furnished with good authors; for which he readily gave himself, and excited others to give considerable sums. Moreover, certain dues, payable to the college, which had been formerly expended in feasting, he converted to the purchase of valuable books for the library." (p. 584)
    "This book by Palmer defends the Scriptural view that people can exercise their right to self-defense against tyrannical civil rulers, and was apparently written to defend the English Parliament's right to defend itself against the evil King Charles I.
    "Romans 13 is often misused to justify the authority of any existing civil ruler (even evil tyrants like Adolph Hitler and Saddam Hussein at times), and therefore condemn as unscriptural any resistance to him. But Palmer points out that such an argument is not the true meaning of the passage:

    In a word, till God's Ordinance can be proved allowing tyranny (which can never be), or undeniably ordaining a man to suffer it, which is no where in His Word (I mean the extremity of tyranny depriving of life, or so), though often it is so in His providence, when he affords no means of resistance: This text of the Apostle will no way condemn the resisting by arms tyrannous and illegal outrageous violences (p. 5).
    "Romans 13 only condemns resistance to lawful magistrates, not tyrants. If Romans 13 granted scriptural protection to tyrants, then 'the blessed Ordinance of God in Magistracy shall turn to the greatest curse to mankind (the best and most conscientious of them), that can be imagined, in regard of outward sufferings, and general confusion.' (p. 6). In verse 4 of Romans 13 [Romans 13:4], the magistrate is described as 'the Minister of God to thee for good.' Palmer asks, 'But is this true of a tyrant bent to subvert Religion, Laws, and Liberties? Is he the Minister of God to thee for good? Or the Minister of his own lusts rather, for evil? Resistance of such an one then, is not the resistance the Apostle forbids, but of one who is the conservatour of Religion, for he, and he only is the Minister of God to thee for good.' (p. 9)
    "The power and authority of civil rulers is only legitimate when used for good.
    "I say then an absolute arbitrary power, or absolute Monarchy (as some call it), is not at all the Ordinance of GOD; and so no lawful power secured from resistance by Rom. 13:2 [Romans 13:2]. First GOD allows no man to rule as he list, to make what laws he list, to punish how and whom he list. But His Word speaks the contrary every where . . . [A civil ruler], hath no authority to bid what GOD forbids, or to forbid what GOD bids; or punish them that obey GOD rather than him." (pp. 51-52)
    "Resorting to armed resistance, however, is not to be undertaken unless all other avenues of redress have first been pursued."
    An open and public resistance by arms, is the last refuge under Heaven, of an oppressed, and endangered nation. Many injuries are to be let pass, while appearing but personal, not political, or designed as precedents. Jealousies are not to be suddenly taken up, nor too deeply taken in: And all possible means of redress and satisfaction is to be endeavoured before this course be taken." (p. 80) -- Publisher

    *Parliament, The First Parliament During the Reign of James VI of Scotland, Christ's Triumphant Entry Into Scotland; Or, The Subjugation of the People, Laws, Liberties, and Crown of Scotland to His Supreme Majesty Jesus Christ, King of Kings, and Lord of Lords; Being, The Complete Text of all of the Acts of the First Parliament During the Reign of James VI of Scotland.
    He shall not fail nor be discouraged, till he have set judgment in the earth: and the isles shall wait for his law. (Isaiah 42:4)
    The LORD reigneth; let the earth rejoice; let the multitude of isles be glad thereof. (Psalm 97:1)
    And he shall bring forth thy righteousness as the light, and thy judgment as the noonday. (Psalm 37:6)
    http://truecovenanter.com/official/acts_of_parliament_scotland_james_vi_p01.phtml
    See: Skene, John, THE LAVVES AND ACTES OF PARLIAMENT, MAID BE KING IAMES THE FIRST, AND HIS SUCCESSOURS KINGES OF SCOTLAND.

    Patrick, Millar, Bruce Rogers, Pforzheimer Bruce Rogers Collection (Library of Congress), Four Centuries of Scottish Psalmody (London and New York: Oxford University Press, 1949).

    Paul, Robert S., The Assembly of the Lord: Politics and Religion in the Westminster Assembly and the Grand Debate, ISBN: 0567085597 9780567085597.
    "Too bad this excellent book is so expensive. It is the kind of book that anybody interested in the background of the Westminster Assembly would enjoy reading. Detailed, scholarly, and thoroughly documented. We think it is well worth the price for the understanding that it imparts." -- GCB

    Peden, Alexander, The Lord's Trumpet Sounding an Alarm Against Scotland: By Warning of a Bloody Sword. Being the Substance of a Preface and two Prophetical Sermons, Preached at Glenluce, anno, 1682, by That Great Scottish Prophet Mr. Alexander Peden, Late Minister of the Gospel at New Glenluce, in Galloway.
    The Lord's Trumpet Sounding an Alarm Against Scotland
    http://www.truecovenanter.com/guthrie/guthrie_james_causes_of_wrath.html

    *Pendlebury, William, National Repentance and Reformation the way to Obtain National Blessings. A sermon preach'd at Rotherham in Yorkshire, on the eleventh of April, 1744, . . . by William Pendlebury, M.A.

    *Price, Greg L., Foundation for Reformation: The Regulative Principle of Worship, 22 pages. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #1.
    Foundation for Reformation: The Regulative Principle of Worship. Greg Price
    http://www.swrb.com/newslett/actualNLs/reformation-rpw-gp.htm

    Price, Greg L., History of the Assembly at Westminster, a series of 13 audio files. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #9, Available (series of 13 audio files), at SermonAudio.com.
    "This lecture is probably the best introductory historical account of this unsurpassed Assembly in audio format. It fulfills the same purpose for which Hetherington noted he wrote his classic, THE HISTORY OF THE WESTMINSTER ASSEMBLY OF DIVINES (only it is in audio format and much shorter):

    In common with all true Presbyterians, I have often regretted the want of a History of the Westminster Assembly of Divines . . . Especially in such a time as the present, when all distinctive Presbyterian principles are not only called in question, but also misrepresented and condemned, such a want has become absolutely unendurable, unless Presbyterians are willing to permit their Church to perish under a load of unanswered, yet easily refuted, calumny. And as the best refutation of calumny is the plain and direct statement of truth, it is by that process that I have endeavored to vindicate the principles and the character of the Presbyterian Church (p. i.).
    "The Puritan history leading up to the Assembly (which this lecture takes an in-depth look at), is especially important and not only set the context for what became the major debates among the ministers present, but even dictated who was selected to this august body of scholars. Civil wars, national upheavals, emigration to the 'new world' and a host of other epoch making events surrounded this momentous period of history. These debates and their resolutions have defined and directed Christian thought and national cultures ever since their original ratification -- and Hetherington (in THE HISTORY OF THE WESTMINSTER ASSEMBLY OF DIVINES), is not shy about noting the significance of this Assembly when he writes,
    But the man who penetrates a little deeper into the nature of those unrevealed but powerful influences which move a nation's mind, and mould its destinies, will be ready to direct his attention more profoundly to the objects and deliberations of an assembly which met at a moment so critical, and was comprised of the great master-minds of the age; and the theologian who has learned to view religion as the vital principle of human nature, equally in nations and in the individual man, will not easily admit the weak idea, that such an assembly could have been an isolated event, but will be disposed earnestly to inquire what led to its meeting, and what important consequences followed. And although the subject has not hitherto been investigated with such a view, it may, we trust, be possible to prove, that it (the Westminster Assembly -- RB), was the most important event in the century in which it occurred; and that it has exerted, and in all probability will yet exert, a far more wide and permanent influence upon both the civil and the religious history of mankind than has generally been even imagined (p. 17).
    "Many consider this era a historical high water mark for doctrinal and practical Puritan precision and this work is indispensable for understanding the work accomplished by the Westminster Assembly, Presbyterian and Independent history, Cromwell, and much more. For example, consider the lofty and Christ honoring goal of the Assembly as summarized by Hetherington (in THE HISTORY OF THE WESTMINSTER ASSEMBLY OF DIVINES):
    There was one great, and even sublime idea, brought somewhat indefinitely before the Westminster Assembly, which has not yet been realized, the idea of a Protestant union throughout Christendom, not merely for the purpose of counterbalancing Popery, but in order to purify, strengthen, and unite all true Christian churches, so that with combined energy and zeal they might go forth, in glad compliance with the Redeemer's commands, teaching all nations, and preaching the everlasting gospel to every creature under heaven. This truly magnificent, and also truly Christian idea, seems to have originated in the mind of that distinguished man, Alexander Henderson. It was suggested by him to the Scottish commissioners, and by them partially brought before the English Parliament, requesting them to direct the Assembly to write letters to the Protestant Churches in France, Holland, Switzerland, and other Reformed Churches. . . . and along with these letters were sent copies of the Solemn League and Covenant, a document which might itself form the basis of such a Protestant union. The deep thinking divines of the Netherlands apprehended the idea, and in their answer, not only expressed their approbation of the Covenant, but also desired to join in it with the British kingdoms. Nor did they content themselves with the mere expression of approval and willingness to join. A letter was soon afterwards sent to the Assembly from the Hague, written by Duraeus (the celebrated John Dury), offering to come to the Assembly, and containing a copy of a vow which he had prepared and tendered to the distinguished Oxenstiern, chancellor of Sweden, wherein he bound himself 'to prosecute a reconciliation between Protestants in point of religion'. . . . On one occasion Henderson procured a passport to go to Holland, most probably for the purpose of prosecuting this grand idea. But the intrigues of politicians, the delays caused by the conduct of the Independents, and the narrow-minded Erastianism of the English Parliament, all conspired to prevent the Assembly from entering farther into that truly glorious Christian enterprise. Days of trouble and darkness came; persecution wore out the great men of that remarkable period; pure and vital Christianity was stricken to the earth and trampled under foot.' (pp. 337-339)
    "Further demonstrating his grasp of the most important events of the second Reformation, Hetherington comments on the Solemn League (the epitome of second Reformation attainments), 'no man who is able to understand its nature, and to feel and appreciate its spirit and its aim, will deny it to be the wisest, the sublimest, and the most sacred document ever framed by uninspired men.' (p. 134). Price gives special attention in this study to the central place of the Solemn League and Covenant in the thinking and international vision for Biblical Reformation of the Westminster Divines. Anyone interested in the work of the Westminster Assembly -- and the men, teaching and events which were at the heart of the Puritan revolution against the forces of antichrist -- should read listen to this audio track at least once." -- Publisher
    History of the Westminster Assembly of Divines 1/13 by Greg Price
    http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?currSection=sermonssource&sermonID=4140113051
    The Westminster Confession of Faith (The Westminster Standards), and Related Works: A Study Guide
    http://www.lettermen2.com/lettermen2/suggest.html

    *Purves, Jock, Fair Sunshine: Character Studies of the Scottish Covenanters (The Banner of Truth Trust, 1968), 206 pages, ISBN: 0851511368 9780851511368. Publishing history: The material in this volume consists of two works: SWEET BELIEVING, 1948, and FAIR SUNSHINE: FURTHER STUDIES OF THE SCOTTISH COVENANTERS (91 pages), 1957.
    "I first read this book several years ago at the recommendation of my late father, who was a sovereign grace Baptist minister. . . .
    "I would highly recommend this book to anyone. And anyone who reads this book will be truly blessed. If it were possible the book should have more than five stars." -- Reader's Comment
    An Outline of Scottish 'Covenant History' in the 17th Century From Purves' Book FAIR SUNSHINE
    http://www.ianpaisley.org/article.asp?cov_intro.htm

    *Reformed Presbytery (Scotland), Historical Testimony, Church Union and the Second Reformation. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #1.
    "Notes: Excerpted from: THE ACT, DECLARATION AND TESTIMONY FOR THE WHOLE OF OUR COVENANTED REFORMATION . . . BY THE REFORMED PRESBYTERY, pp. 177-178 (reprinted 1995 from the 1876 edition). Includes a catalog of resources concerning the history of the Reformed Presbytery in various countries."
    http://www.swrb.com/newslett/actualnls/HistTest.htm

    Reformed Presbyterian Church (Scotland), Reformed Presbyterian Testimony, 1842. Alternate title: TESTIMONY OF THE REFORMED PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN SCOTLAND: HISTORICAL AND DOCTRINAL (Glasgow: John Keith, 1842), over 400 pages. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
    "Keddie describes this as 'a doctrinal and historical statement, explaining and expanding upon the RPC's commitment to the Westminster Standards, the National Covenant, and the Solemn League and Covenant.' (Nigel Cameron, editor, Dictionary of Scottish Church History and Theology, p. 699). It contains the historical part of the testimony of the Reformed Presbyterian Church in Scotland including a brief sketch of the contending of the witnesses from the earliest period to the present time. The doctrinal section of the Church's testimony follows, covering everything from 'Divine Revelation' to 'Covenanting'." -- Publisher

    Reformed Presbyterian Church (Scotland), A Short Account of the Old Presbyterian Dissenters, Under the Inspection of the Reformed Presbyteries of Scotland, Ireland, and North America: Comprehending Also an Abstract of Their Principles.
    A Short Account of the Old Presbyterian Dissenters, Section I: The Several Names, by Which the old Dissenters Have Been Known and Distinguished
    http://www.covenanter.org/reformed/2015/8/24/a-short-account-of-the-old-presbyterian-dissenters

    Reformed Presbyterian, The, The Reformed Presbyterian.
    A magazine.

    *Reformed Presbyterian Church of Scotland, Andrew Symington (editor), Lectures on the Principles of the Second Reformation. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #18.
    "Contents: Second Reformation / Andrew Symington
    Headship of Christ Over His church / James Ferguson
    Evils, Constitutional and Practical of the Prelatic Establishment of the British Empire / Thomas Neilson
    The Revolution Settlement of the Church of Scotland / John Graham
    Patronage Opposed to the Independence of the Church and to the Scriptural Rights of Christian people / W.H. Goold
    Headship of Christ Over the Nations / Andrew Symington
    Nature and Obligation of Public Vows / William Symington
    The sin and Danger of Union Between the Church of Christ and the Immoral or Anti-Christian Civil Government / Stewart Bates."
    Lectures on the Principles of the Second Reformation
    http://www.covenanter.org/reformed/2015/8/18/the-reformed-presbyterian-churchs-of-scotland-lectures-on-the-principles-of-the-second-reformation

    Reformed Presbyterian Church (Scotland), Reformed Presbyterian Testimony, 1842. Alternate title: TESTIMONY OF THE REFORMED PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN SCOTLAND: HISTORICAL AND DOCTRINAL (Glasgow: John Keith, 1842), over 400 pages. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
    "Keddie describes this as 'a doctrinal and historical statement, explaining and expanding upon the RPC's commitment to the Westminster Standards, the National Covenant, and the Solemn League and Covenant.' (Nigel Cameron, editor, Dictionary of Scottish Church History and Theology, p. 699). It contains the historical part of the testimony of the Reformed Presbyterian Church in Scotland including a brief sketch of the contending of the witnesses from the earliest period to the present time. The doctrinal section of the Church's testimony follows, covering everything from 'Divine Revelation' to 'Covenanting'." -- Publisher

    Reformed Presbytery, North America, Toleration: The Cut-throat of True Religion, excerpted from: THE ACT, DECLARATION AND TESTIMONY FOR THE WHOLE OF OUR COVENANTED REFORMATION . . . BY THE REFORMED PRESBYTERY, pp. 177-178 (reprinted 1995 from the 1876 edition). Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #1.
    "Includes a catalog of resources concerning the history of the Reformed Presbytery in various countries."
    Reformed Presbytery (America), Excerpted from: The Act, Declaration and Testimony for the Whole of Our Covenanted Reformation . . . by the Reformed Presbytery, pp. 89-90 (SWRB digital download or rare bound photocopy [1761], reprinted 1995 from the 1876 edition).
    Reformed Presbytery (America), Toleration: The Cut-Throat of True Religion
    http://www.swrb.com/newslett/actualNLs/ToleratT.htm

    *Reid, H.M.B., A Cameronian Apostle: Being Some Account of John Macmillan of Balmaghie, 1896. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #30.
    "The author wrote this book 'considering the renewed interest taken at present in questions of Church government and establishment,' noting that 'there seemed to be some room for a detailed treatment of a career which covers so interesting a period as that embraced between 1690 and 1750.' Macmillan is an important historical link to those who still fight for Christ's Crown and Covenant. 'For many years he fought the battle of the Covenants alone, and he fought it on lines of policy and wisdom.' states Reid. Furthermore, the author continues, 'I have tried to indicate his position among the 'Suffering Remnant' by calling him 'a Cameronian Apostle;' for, during the long period of 36 years, he was the sole ordained minister among the scattered congregations of the 'Society' people. The name seems not unfitting, and it receives a certain sanction from the authority of Dr. Cunningham, who styled him the 'high-priest' of the Societies . . . Further, Macmillan's story is also the record of the development of a most interesting side of Scottish Church life. He may be said, indeed, to have made the history of what, at last, became the Reformed Presbyterian Church. This is so true, that that Church long bore the popular name of the 'Macmillanites.' And the name of Macmillan is bound up with more than one congregation still existing.' An important book for those who would trace the backsliding of modern Presbyterianism (the neopresbyterians), and also be encouraged by the remnant of those who remain faithful to the position of the original Covenanters (the paleopresbyterians). This book's 308 pages includes illustrations and a detailed appendix containing important church documents." -- Publisher

    Reid, H.M.B. (Henry Martyn Beckwith), The Kirk Above Dee Water, 1895. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
    " 'This little book (128 pages), . . . embodies a few scattered notices of the Balmaghie Church since the year 1615 . . . The dominating figure in the following pages is, of course, the great Macmillan' (Preface). Here 'they went to hear the word of God properly preached' in the Kirk of the Hill Folk, which had never fyled its hands with 'an Erastian Establishment!' (Introduction). An interesting look at a Covenanter congregation." -- Publisher

    *Reid, W. Stanford, Trumpeter of God: A Biography of John Knox, 372 pages, ISBN: 0801077087 9780801077081.
    Knox laid the foundation for Presbyterianism and the Covenanted Reformation.

    Renwick, James (1662-1688), A Choice Collection of Very Valuable Prefaces, Lectures, and Sermons, Preached Upon the Mountains and Muirs of Scotland, in the hottest time of the late persecution. By . . . Mr. James Renwick. . . . The fourth edition. To which are added, The form and order of the admission of ruling elders; A reply to Mr Langlan's Letter to Gavin Wotherspoon; and A testimony to the truths of God . . . 1777. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #29.

    *Renwick, James (1662-1688), Select Works of John Renwick, at True Covenanter
    http://www.truecovenanter.com/renwick/index.htm

    *Renwick, James (1662-1688), The Testimony of Some Persecuted Presbyterian Ministers of the Gospel Unto the Covenanted Reformation of the Church of Scotland, and to the Present Expediency of Continuing to Preach the Gospel in the Fields, and Against the Present anti-Christian Toleration in its Nature and Design, Tending to Bury all These in Oblivion, Lately Obtruded Upon, and Accepted by the Body of this Nation, 1688. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
    A Testimony Against anti-Christian Toleration, James Renwick; Alexander Shields
    http://www.truecovenanter.com/renwick/renwick_testimony_16880117.html

    Renwick, James (1662-1688), Thomas Houston, Spiritual Support and Consolation in Difficult Times.

    Roberts, William Louis (1798-1864), The Covenanting Martyrs and the Revival of the Covenants! (From the REFORMED PRESBYTERIAN CATECHISM).
    http://www.swrb.com/newslett/actualnls/CovMart.htm
    Reformed Presbyterian Catechism, William L. Roberts D.D.
    http://archive.org/details/ReformedPresbyterianCatechism

    *Roberts, William Louis (1798-1864), The Duty of Nations, in Their National Capacity, to Acknowledge and Support the True Religion, 1853. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #25.
    "Excerpted from THE REFORMED PRESBYTERIAN CATECHISM below, this book deals with the inescapable necessity, of the demand found in the Word of God, for the Civil establishment of Christ as King and Lawgiver over every nation on earth. If you are sick of the cease-fire with humanism, set forth by the syncretistic, Satanic and pragmatic pagan politicians of our day (those who bargain with votaries of Antichrist [the Pope], publicly tolerate all manner of false religions (e.g. Islam), and idolatry, and comprise their policy and draw their pretended authority from the beast [and not the Word of God], this book is for you! For all pagan politics is summed up in the words of the Cameronian (Covenanter) political philosopher Alexander Shields, as 'rotting away under the destructive distempers of detestable neutrality, loathsome lukewarmness, declining, and decaying in corruptions, defections, divisions, distractions, confusions; and so judicially infatuated with darkness and delusions, that they forget and forego the necessary testimony of the day.' (A Hind let Loose. 1797 edition, p. 20). Pick up this book and begin the political walk in the 'footsteps of the flock,' traveling the covenanting road of Reformation and Scripture (with the magisterial Reformers of the past)!" -- Publisher
    On the Duty of Covenanting and the Permanent Obligations of Religious Covenants, being section 11 in the Reformed Presbyterian Catechism, 1853, by William L. Roberts
    http://www.swrb.com/newslett/actualnls/PresCatCov.htm
    A Hind Let Loose; Or An Historical Representation of the Testimonies of the Church of Scotland. . . . by Mr. Alexander Shields, Minister of the Gospel, in St. Andrews
    http://www.truecovenanter.com/shields/
    A Hind let Loose: or, An Historical Representation of the Testimonies of the Church of Scotland, for the Interest of Christ: With the True State Thereof in all its Periods, Shields, Alexander
    http://archive.org/details/hindletlooseorhi00shie
    Reformed Presbyterian Catechism, William L. Roberts D.D.
    http://archive.org/details/ReformedPresbyterianCatechism

    Roberts, William, The Exclusive Headship of The Lord Jesus Christ Over the Church of God. Excerpted From THE REFORMED PRESBYTERIAN CATECHISM, by William Roberts, Section II, "Christ's Exclusive Headship Over the Church"
    http://www.truecovenanter.com/reformedpresbyterian/roberts_rp_catechism_section_02_christs_headship_over_the_church.html

    Roberts, William Louis, D.D. (1798-1864), The Higher Law, or, The Law of the Most High: A Discourse, Delivered at the Baptist Church, in Sterling Centre, Wednesday Evening, Jan. 22d, 1851.

    *Roberts, William Louis (1798-1864), The Reformed Presbyterian Catechism, ISBN: 0524065543 9780524065549. A Christian classic. Considered to be among the ten greatest books in the English language. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available from ATLA 1991-2638.
    A magnificent catechism that sets forth the Crown Rights of The King of Glory and Lord of Lords. It also presents incontrovertible evidence that the United States Constitution is not a Christian document, and that it is, in fact, a slavery document.
    "A manual of instruction, drawing from such notable authors as William Symington and J.R. Willson, presenting 'arguments and facts confirming and illustrating the 'Distinctive Principles' of the Reformed Presbyterian Church. Chapters deal with: 'Christ's Mediatorial Dominion in General;' Christ's Exclusive Headship Over the Church;' 'The Supreme and Ultimate Authority of the Word of God in the Church;' Civil Government, the Moral Ordinance of God;' Christ's Headship Over the Nations;' 'The Subjection of the Nations to God and to Christ;' The Word, or Revealed Will of God, the Supreme Law in the State;' 'The Duty of Nations, in Their National Capacity, to Acknowledge and Support the True Religion:' 'The Spiritual Independence of the Church of Christ:' 'The Right and Duty of Dissent From an Immoral Constitution of Civil Government;' 'The Duty of Covenanting, and the Permanent Obligations of Religious Covenants;' 'The Application of These Principles to the Governments, Where Reformed Presbyterians Reside, in the Form of a Practical Testimony;' and finally 'Application of the Testimony to the British Empire. . . '." -- Publisher
    Reformed Presbyterian Catechism, William L. Roberts D.D.
    http://archive.org/details/ReformedPresbyterianCatechism
    Roberts, William, On the Mediatorial Dominion of The Lord Jesus Christ, excerpted from THE REFORMED PRESBYTERIAN CATECHISM.
    http://www.truecovenanter.com/reformedpresbyterian/roberts_rp_catechism_section_01_mediatorial_dominion.html
    Roberts, William, The Exclusive Headship of The Lord Jesus Christ Over the Church of God, excerpted from the REFORMED PRESBYTERIAN CATECHISM.
    http://www.truecovenanter.com/reformedpresbyterian/roberts_rp_catechism_section_02_christs_headship_over_the_church.html
    Roberts, William, Civil Government the Moral Ordinance of God, excerpted from THE REFORMED PRESBYTERIAN CATECHISM.
    http://www.truecovenanter.com/reformedpresbyterian/roberts_rp_catechism_section_04_civil_government.html
    Roberts, William, On Christ's Headship Over the Nations, excerpted from THE REFORMED PRESBYTERIAN CATECHISM.
    http://www.truecovenanter.com/reformedpresbyterian/roberts_rp_catechism_section_05_christs_headship_over_nations.html
    Roberts, William, The Subjection of the Nations to God and to Christ, excerpted from the REFORMED PRESBYTERIAN CATECHISM.
    http://www.truecovenanter.com/reformedpresbyterian/roberts_rp_catechism_section_06_subjection_of_nations_to_christ.html
    See also: The Scottish Covenanting Struggle, Alexander Craighead, and the Mecklenburg Declaration, SECRET PROCEEDINGS AND DEBATES OF THE CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION, CONSPIRACY IN PHILADELPHIA: THE ORIGINS OF THE U.S. CONSTITUTION, and A THEOLOGICAL INTERPRETATION OF AMERICAN HISTORY.

    Roberts, William Louis (1798-1864), Submission to "the powers that be" Scripturally Illustrated: A Discourse in Three Parts, 1828. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #26.

    Robinson, Hastings (editor), Original Letters Relative to the English Reformation Written During the Reigns of King Henry VIII., King Edward VI., and Queen Mary: Chiefly From the Archives of Zurich, 1846-47, 2 volumes, 819 pages, ISBN: 155635049X 9781556350498. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
    "The greater part of these letters are now printed for the first time: they will be found to contain many details of interest, relative to various proceedings of that period, and occasionally to give much information respecting the customs and manners of the times, as well as the private history of the writers and other individuals to whom they refer. Bucer, Melancthon, Calvin, Cranmer, Edward VI., Lady Jane Grey, Hooper, Ponet, Bullinger, Foxe, Goodman and a host of others either penned or received these letters. These letters where 'translated from authenticated copies of the autographs'." -- Publisher

    Robinson, Hastings (editor), The Zurich Letters, or the Correspondence of Several English Bishops and Others, With Some of the Helvetian Reformers, During the Reign of Queen Elizabeth, 1846, 592 pages, ISBN: 155635049X 9781556350498. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
    "Taken chiefly from the Archives of Zurich, these letters have been translated from authenticated copies of the autographs for the Parker Society. The Parker Society was 'instituted for the publication of the works of the fathers and early writers of the Reformed English Church.' The editor notes that he 'refrains from any remarks upon the various topics treated in these letters; it being his desire, and the object of the Society, that the respective writers should speak for themselves.' Notes are added, however, 'for the purpose of throwing additional light upon the facts and circumstances recorded in the correspondence.' Calvin, Beza, Bullinger, Martyr, Farell, Zanchius, Coverdale, Queen Elizabeth and a host of others either penned or received these letters. Contains an extensive index and table of contents." -- Publisher

    Russell, Conrad, The Causes of the English Civil War, ISBN: 0198221428 9780198221425 019822141X 9780198221418.

    *Rutherford, Samuel (1600-1661), A Free Disputation Against Pretended Liberty of Conscience, 1649. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #9, #25, and #26.
    "Rutherford's FREE DISPUTATION, though scarce, is still one of his most important works with maybe only a few copies of the actual book left in existence. Though Rutherford is affectionately remembered in our day for his LETTERS, or for laying the foundations of constitutional government (against the divine right of kings), in his unsurpassed LEX, REX his FREE DISPUTATION should not be overlooked for it contains the same searing insights as LEX, REX. In fact, this book should probably be known as Rutherford's 'politically incorrect' companion volume to LEX, REX. A sort of sequel aimed at driving pluralists and antinomians insane. Written against 'the Belgick Arminians, Socinians, and other Authors contending for lawlesse liberty, or licentious Tolerations of Sects and Heresies,' Rutherford explains the undiluted Biblical solution to moral relativism, especially as it is expressed in ecclesiastical and civil pluralism! (Corporate pluralism being a violation of the first commandment and an affront to the holy God of Scripture). He also deals with conscience, toleration, penology (punishment), and the judicial laws, as related to both the civil and ecclesiastical realms. Excellent sections are also included which address questions related to determining the fundamentals of religion, how covenants bind us, the perpetual obligation of social covenants (with direct application to the Solemn League and Covenant and the covenant-breaking of Cromwell and his sectarian supporters), whether the punishing of seducing teachers be persecution of conscience, and much more. Walker adds these comments and context regarding Rutherford's FREE DISPUTATION, 'The principle of toleration was beginning to be broached in England, and in a modified shape to find acceptance there. Samuel Rutherford was alarmed, or rather, I should say, he was horrified, for he neither feared the face of man or argument. He rushed to the rescue of the good old view . . . It is not so easy to find a theoretical ground for toleration; and Rutherford has many plausible things to say against it. With the most perfect confidence, he argues that it is alike against Scripture and common sense that you should have two religions side by side. It is outrageous ecclesiastically, it is sinful civilly. He does not, however, take what I call the essentially persecuting ground. He does not hold that the magistrate is to punish religion as religion. Nay, he strongly maintains that the civil magistrate never aims at the conscience. The magistrate, he urges, does not send anyone, whether a heretic (who is a soul murderer -- RB), or a murderer, to the scaffold with the idea of producing conversion or other spiritual result, but to strengthen the foundations of civil order. But if he gives so much power to the king, he is no lover of despotism withal: the king himself must be under law. To vindicate this great doctrine is the object of another book, the celebrated LEX, REX; of which it has been said by one competent to judge, that it first clearly developed the constitutionalism which all men now accept.' (Theology and Theologians . . . pp. 11-12). In our day Francis Schaeffer, and numerous others, have critiqued many of the problems found in modern society, but most have spent little time developing explicitly Biblical solutions especially regarding the theoretical foundations that Rutherford addresses here. Rutherford's FREE DISPUTATION provides a detailed blueprint for laying the foundations that must be laid before any lasting, God-honoring solutions will be found. Furthermore, Rutherford and his writings were the enemies of all governments not covenanted with Christ. This book will give you a very clear picture as to why 'the beast' (civil and ecclesiastical), has reserved his special hatred for such teaching. As Samuel Wylie noted 'the dispute, then, will not turn upon the point whether religion should be civilly established . . . but it is concerning what religion ought to be civilly established and protected, -- whether the religion of Jesus alone should be countenanced by civil authority, or every blasphemous, heretical, and idolatrous abomination which the subtle malignity of the old serpent and a heart deceitful above all things and desperately wicked, can frame and devise, should be put on an equal footing therewith." -- The Two Sons of Oil; or, the Faithful Witness for Magistracy and Ministry Upon a Scriptural Basis. Can our generation swallow Rutherford's hard, anti-pluralistic, Covenanter medicine, poured forth from the bottle of the first commandment, without choking on their carnal dreams of a free and righteous society divorced from God (and His absolute claims upon everyone and everything)? Not without the enabling power of the Holy Spirit -- that is for sure! In summary, this book answers all the hardest questions theonomists (and their wisest and best opponents), have been asking for the last 20-30 years (and these answers are much more in depth than any we have seen in the last couple of millennia [less about a century to account for the apostles]). As the reader will discover, Rutherford was a wealthy man when it came to wisdom (and much advanced theologically), and those who take the time to gaze into the King's treasure house, as exhibited in this book, will find that they are greatly rewarded. Furthermore, because of its uncompromising stand upon the Word of God, this book is sure to be unpopular among a wicked and adulterous generation. However, on the other hand, it is sure to be popular among the covenanted servants of King Jesus! This is one of the best books (in the top five anyway), for advanced study of the Christian faith. We have now obtained an easy-to-read, amazingly clear copy of this very rare, old treasure. Great price too, considering that a copy of the 1649 edition, containing this quality of print, would likely cost upwards of $1000 on the rare book market -- though it is unlikely you would ever see a copy for sale!" -- Publisher
    A Brotherly and Free Epistle to the Patrons and Friends of Pretended Liberty of Conscience, Samuel Rutherford
    http://www.truecovenanter.com/anti_toleration/rutherfurd_epistle_against_pretendedlibertyofconscience.html
    The Covenant Between God and Kings, from A DEFENSE OF LIBERTY
    http://www.constitution.org/vct/vindiciae1a.htm

    *Rutherford, Samuel (1600-1661), The Glory, Majesty, Dominion and Power of Jesus Christ, 1643. Alternate title: A SERMON PREACHED TO THE HONORABLE HOUSE OF COMMONS: AT THEIR LATE SOLEMNE FAST, WEDNESDAY, JANU. 31. 1643. BY SAMUEL RUTHERFURD, PROFESSOR OF DIVINITIE IN THE UNIVERSITIE OF ST. ANDREWS. PUBLISHED BY ORDER OF THE HOUSE OF COMMONS. [Daniel 6:26], 1644. A Christian classic. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available [THE GLORY, MAJESTY, DOMINION AND POWER OF JESUS CHRIST, 1643] on Reformation Bookshelf CD #9, #25, and #29.
    "Here Rutherford covers a wide range of topics including Christ's kingship and dominion over civil governments, what lawful power (civil and ecclesiastical), is, God's providence, suffering (especially among those covenanted to Him), the oppression and martyrdom of the saints, the wrath of God, apologetics, the fear of God, the visible church, assurance and the weak believer, the free offer of the Gospel, the sovereignty of God, antinomianism, Arminianism, and much more. However, whatever the subject, Rutherford can be found focusing on and exalting the Lord Jesus Christ and His truth in a way that few others have been granted the ability to do -- notwithstanding the fact that he himself wrote, 'I have neither tongue nor pen to express to you the happiness of such as are in Christ.' (Letters of Samuel Rutherford, p. 47). Classic Rutherford, preached before some of the most powerful civil leaders of his day!" -- Publisher
    "It hath been the sin of this Land, that when Episcopacy, anti-Christian Ceremonies, Superstition, and Will-worship were enjoined by Law, to pleasure an earthly King, you willingly followed after the command, against the direction of the King of Kings: and now hath the Lord delivered the people of the Land into the hand of their KING. And for this the Sword of the Lord hath gone through the Land." -- Samuel Rutherford

    *Rutherford, Samuel (1600-1661), Letters of Samuel Rutherford, ISBN: 0851511635. A Christian classic. Considered to be among the ten greatest books in the English language. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #10, #21.
    With a biographical introduction by Andrew Bonar. "These letters will ever be precious to all who are sensible of their own, and the church's decay and corruptions." -- Andrew Bonar
    "Like a strong winged eagle he soars into the highest heaven and with unblenched eye he looks into the mystery of love divine. . . . When we are dead and gone let the world know that Spurgeon held RUTHERFORD'S LETTERS to be the nearest thing to inspiration which can be found in all the writings of mere men." -- C.H. Spurgeon
    "Hold off the Bible, such a book the world never saw." -- Richard Baxter
    Letters of Samuel Rutherford
    http://www.puritansermons.com/toc.htm#RUTH
    Letters of Samuel Rutherford
    http://books.google.com/books?id=tI_iAAAACAAJ&ie=ISO-8859-1&output=html

    *Rutherford, Samuel (1600-1661), Lex, rex, or The law and the Prince, ISBN: 0873779517. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #10, #25.
    " 'Lex, rex' is Latin for 'law is king.'
    "LEX, REX is 'the great political text of the Covenanters.' (Johnston citing Innes in Treasury of the Scottish Covenant, p. 305). 'Rutherford was the first to formulate the great constitutional principle Lex est Rex -- the law is King . . . much of the doctrine has become the constitutional inheritance of all countries in modern times.'
    "Gilmour writes [in SAMUEL RUTHERFORD], 'that, as regards religious fervour, scholastic subtlety of intellect, and intensity of ecclesiastical conviction, Samuel Rutherford is the most distinctively representative Scotsman in the first half of the seventeenth century'." -- Publisher
    "Without a doubt one of the greatest books on political philosophy ever written. Rutherford here has penned a great Christian charter of liberty against all forms of civil tyranny -- vindicating the Scriptural duty to resist tyrants as an act of loyalty to God." -- Publisher
    "That resistance to lawful authority -- even when that authority so called has, in point of fact, set at nought 'all law' -- is in no instance to be vindicated, will be held by those only who are the devotees of arbitrary power and passive obedience. The principles of Mr. Rutherford's LEX, REX, however obnoxious they may be to such men, are substantially the principles on which all government is founded, and without which the civil magistrate would become a curse rather than a blessing to a country. They are the very principles which lie at the basis of the British Constitution, and by whose tenure the House of Brunswick does at this very moment hold possession of the throne of these realms." -- Rev. Robert Burns, D.D., in his "Preliminary Dissertation" to Wodrow's Church History
    Additional sources of text related to LEX REX are as follows:
    "Though Rutherford is affectionately remembered in our day for his LETTERS, or for laying the foundations of constitutional government (against the divine right of kings), in his unsurpassed LEX, REX, his FREE DISPUTATION should not be overlooked, for it contains the same searing insights as LEX, REX. In fact, this book [A FREE DISPUTATION AGAINST PRETENDED LIBERTY OF CONSCIENCE -- compiler] should probably be known as Rutherford's 'politically incorrect' companion volume to LEX, REX. It is a sort of sequel aimed at driving pluralists and antinomians insane. Written against 'the Belgick Arminians, Socinians, and other Authors contending for lawless liberty, or licentious Tolerations of Sects and Heresies,' Rutherford explains the undiluted Biblical solution to moral relativism, especially as it is expressed in ecclesiastical and civil pluralism! (Corporate pluralism being a violation of the first commandment, and an affront to the holy God of Scripture)." -- Publisher
    A HIND LET LOOSE by Alexander Shields is sometimes referred to as 'Lex, Rex, Volume Two.'
    A Hind Let Loose; or An Historical Representation of the Testimonies of the Church of Scotland. . . . by Mr. Alexander Shields, Minister of the Gospel, in St. Andrews
    http://www.truecovenanter.com/shields/
    A Hind let Loose; or, An Historical Representation of the Testimonies of the Church of Scotland, for the Interest of Christ
    "This book sets forth the Crown rights of King Jesus, against all usurpers in both church and state, giving a history of some of faithful sufferings endured by the elect, in maintaining this truth." -- Publisher
    http://archive.org/details/hindletlooseorhi00shie
    "This [THE DUE RIGHT OF PRESBYTERIES OR A PEACEABLE PLEA FOR THE GOVERNMENT OF THE CHURCH OF SCOTLAND -- compiler], could be considered the LEX, REX of church government -- another exceedingly rare masterpiece of Presbyterianism! Characterized by Walker as sweeping 'over a wider field than most'." -- Publisher
    Rutherford, Samuel (1600-1661), Lex, rex: The law and the Prince, a Dispute for the Just Prerogative of King and People. (1843)
    http://archive.org/details/lexrexlawandpri00ruthgoog
    Lex, rex, or The law and the Prince, Samuel Rutherford
    "Rutherford is to be praised for his teaching that the king is subject to the law of God. The Bible has nothing but condemnation for those who frame mischief by a law and declares rhetorically, Shall the throne of iniquity have fellowship with thee? (Psalm 94:20). Deuteronomy 17 is the classic passage in defense of LEX, REX, wherein the king is charged to read therein all the days of his life: that he may learn to fear the Lord his God, to keep all the words of this law. (Deuteronomy 17:19)." -- Publisher
    http://www.constitution.org/sr/lexrex.htm
    Lex, rex: The law and the Prince, a Dispute for the Just Prerogative of King and People, containing the reasons and causes of the defensive wars of the kingdom of Scotland, and of their expedition for the ayd and help of their brethren of England. In which a full answer is given to a seditious pamphlet, intituled, Sacro-sancta regum majestas, penned by J. Maxwell. By S. Rutherford. [Followed by], De jure regni apud Scotos; a dialogue, tr. by R. Macfarlan (repr. from the ed. of 1799).
    http://books.google.com/books?id=jtYDAAAAQAAJ&ie=ISO-8859-1&output=html
    The Covenant Between God and Kings, from A DEFENSE OF LIBERTY
    http://www.constitution.org/vct/vindiciae1a.htm

    *Schwertley, Brian M., and Westminster Presbyterian Church in the United States. Publications Committee, National Covenanting and Christ's Victory Over the Nations. Available at Reformed Online.
    "This is the first book-length, scholarly exposition and defense of national covenanting since 1843. This comprehensive treatment includes the binding nature of covenants, covenant renewals under the godly kings of Israel, objections to covenanting answered, the unbiblical nature of the U.S. Constitution, the unscriptural alteration of the Westminster Confession of Faith in 1789, the necessity of the Old Testament moral law for a Christian nation and the biblical requirements for civil office. In the book, Rev. Schwertley not only sets forth the biblical case for social or national covenanting in a simple and organized manner but also critiques the modern pluralistic alternatives to the original Presbyterian teaching on this topic." -- Publisher
    It was preceded by 'Social Covenanting,' a series of 31 sermons in MP3 format, given by the author starting in the summer of 2012.
    Social Covenanting series of 31 sermons by Brian Schwertley
    http://www.sermonaudio.com/search.asp?seriesOnly=true&currSection=sermonstopic&sourceid=ccc&keyword=National+Covenanting&keyworddesc=National+Covenanting

    *Shaw, J.W., Hephzibah Beulah. Our Covenants the National and Solemn League; and Covenanting by the Reformed Presbyterian Synod in America: Considered, 1872. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #27.
    "A very useful, easy-to-read, introductory work (by an RPCNA minister), to the topics it deals with. General Scriptural principles upon which this book is based are:

    1. Departure from former laudable attainments, is a great evil, severely threatened in the Holy Scriptures; and that for which every one, who is guilty, must be accountable to the Righteous Judge of all the earth.
    2. They who consent unto the unrighteous deeds of others, are chargeable with guilt, as well as the principal actors.
    3. Societies, or individuals, having once publicly and solemnly vowed unto the Most High God; and still, after the strictest enquiry, remain satisfied in their own mind, that their vows were scriptural; should seriously endeavor to act up to the true spirit and intention of these vows; and no power upon earth, nor any class of men, whether majority or minority, in a nation, can ever possibly dissolve the obligation.
    "Chapters include: The National Covenant and Solemn League and Covenant reviewed; Their Binding Obligations Shown; The Possibility That Adherence to Them may be Professed, While They are Virtually Abandoned; The Covenant Sworn and Subscribed by Synod at Pittsburgh, May 27th, 1871; Is it a Renovation or a new Covenant?; The Covenant Does not Contain all That the Church is Bound to in America; Charges Against the Covenant; Reason why Some who do not Like it, Swear it; The Covenants National and Solemn League Must Be Maintained." -- Publisher
    Shaw, Rev. J.W., Hephzibah Beulah our Covenants the National and Solemn League; And Covenanting by the Reformed Presbyterian Synod in America: Considered
    http://truecovenanter.com/covenants/shaw_hephzibah_beulah.html

    Shields, Alexander (1660?-1700), The Life and Death of That Eminently Pious, Free, and Faithful Minister and Martyr of Jesus Christ, Mr. James Renwick: With a Vindication of the Heads of his Dying Testimony, 1806, 2nd edition. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #2.

    *Sibbes, Richard (1577-1635), The Faithful Covenanter, 1639. Available (THE WORKS OF RICHARD SIBBES), on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #29.
    "An amazing sermon opening the narrow road of faithful covenanting -- as seen first and foremost in the Lord Jesus Christ, our perfect covenant keeper! Expounds on the four periods of time relating to the renewing of the covenant of grace in history. Shows that 'whatsoever we give the supremacy of the inward man to, whatsoever we love most, whatsoever we trust most, whatsoever we fear most, whatsoever we joy and delight in most, whatsoever we obey most -- that is our God.' Applies this to the first commandment, as a part of the law of the covenant, and works out the implications (which involve numerous areas). Goes on to give Scriptural marks whereby covenant keepers can be distinguished from covenant breakers and connects the everlasting covenant with the sacraments and their meaning. A meaty meal, recommended for those who are willing to advance theologically and practically." -- Publisher

    Simpson, Robert, Traditions of the Covenanters, Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
    "The design of this collection is to preserve the memory of good men in the inferior ranks of society, whose worth and whose sufferings have not hitherto been recorded. Their names, though those of plain unlettered men, do not deserve to perish; and their posterity may, by contemplating the virtues of their ancestors, be stimulated to emulate their godliness. 504 pages." -- Publisher

    *Smellie, Alexander (1857-1923), Men of the Covenant: The Story of the Scottish Church in the Years of the Persecution, 534 pages, ISBN: 0851512127. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
    " 'A great book dealing with one of the most inspiring periods of Church history,' said Dr. C. Gregg Singer. Brilliant sketches of Covenanter history addressed to ordinary readers who do not have the opportunity or leisure for protracted personal studies in this area. A testimony, as Smellie notes, to 'the dogged fighters for freedom in Church and State.' The great sufferings these Christians endured gave them a seriousness about the faith, and a 'vision' of the truth, which has been unequaled since -- stirring reading!" -- Publisher
    "Recounts the events in seventeenth century Scotland in which men and women, bound by 'covenant' to Christ, laid down their lives for His cause. Recaptures the intensity, zeal, heroism, and faith of these martyrs, as well as the craftiness and cruelty of their persecutors. First published in 1903." -- Cyril J. Barber
    Men of the Covenant (1908), volume 1 of 2
    http://archive.org/details/menofcovenant01smeluoft

    Sommerville, William, Pamphlet on The Social Position of Reformed Presbyterians or Cameronians
    http://www.covenanter.org/reformed/2015/8/19/william-sommervilles-pamphlet-on-the-social-position-of-reformed-presbyterians-or-cameronians

    Steele, David (1803-1887, editor), "The Heavens do Rule," The Original Covenanter, Vol. II, June, 1880, No. 14. Available in Steele, David (1803-1887, editor), Reformed Presbytery of North America, The Contending Witness, The Reformation Advocate and The Original Covenanter magazines. Also available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #18.
    "Among the most civilized and enlightened people on the earth, we believe, are those of Britain and the United States of North America; yet it is at once evident and to be lamented, that with their advantages for instruction in the science of civil government, they have yet to learn the costly lesson that 'the heavens do rule'. . . ." -- excerpted from "The Heavens do Rule."

    Stevenson, David (b. 1942), The Covenanters: The National Covenant and Scotland, ISBN: 0854110429 9780854110421.

    Stevenson, David (b. 1942), King's College, Aberdeen, 1560-1641: From Protestant Reformation to Covenanting Revolution (Quincentennial Studies Series), ISBN: 0080409199 9780080409191.

    Sundry Ministers of London, A Testimony to the Truth of Jesus Christ and to our Solemn League and Covenant; As Also Against the Errours, Heresies and Blasphemies of These Times, and the Toleration of Them.
    A Testimony to the Truth of Jesus Christ, And to our Solemn League and Covenant; As Also Against the Errours, Heresies and Blasphemies of These Times, and the Toleration of Them. Wherein is Inserted a Catalogue of Divers of the Said Errours &c. All of them being collected out of their authors own books alleadged in the margin, and laid down in their own words; except one that was maintained in a dispute in Oxford, December 11, 1646, and six or seven which were asserted before a Committee of the Honourable House of Commons in the Star-Chamber, and reported to the House, Sept. 12, 1643. Subscribed by the Ministers of Christ Within the Province of London, December 14 &c., 1647.
    http://www.covenanter.org/reformed/2015/8/18/a-testimony-to-the-truth-of-jesus-christ

    *Thomson, John Henderson (editor), John McMain, and David Scott (introduction), A Cloud of Witnesses for the Royal Prerogatives of Jesus Christ Being the Last Speeches and Testimonies of Those who Have Suffered for the Truth in Scotland Since, 1680. Alternate title: THE FIFTEENTH EDITION, ENLARGED AND CORRECTED: A CLOUD OF WITNESSES, FOR THE ROYAL PREROGATIVES OF JESUS CHRIST: OR, THE LAST SPEECHES AND TESTIMONIES OF THOSE WHO HAVE SUFFERED FOR THE TRUTH IN SCOTLAND, SINCE THE YEAR 1680: WITH AN APPENDIX, CONTAINING THE QUEENSFERRY PAPER; TORWOOD EXCOMMUNICATION; A RELATION CONCERNING MR. RICHARD CAMERON, MR. DONALD CARGIL, AND HENRY HALL; AND AN ACCOUNT OF THOSE WHO WERE KILLED WITHOUT PROCESS OF LAW, AND BANISHED TO FOREIGN LANDS: WITH A SHORT VIEW OF SOME OF THE OPPRESSIVE EXACTIONS, ISBN: 0873779231. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
    "With the Testimonies of John Nisbet the Younger, John Nisbet of Hardhill, Robert Miller, Thomas Harkness, &c. A Letter of John Semple's and of Archibald Stewart's. The Paper found upon Mr. Cameron at Airsmoss, and an Acrostick upon his name. The Testimony of John Finlay in Kilmarnock. The Epitaphs upon the Grave Stones of Mr. Samuel Rutherford, Mr. John Welwood, and the noble Patriots who fell at Pentland-hills, &c.
    "Also includes The Testimony of some persecuted Presbyterian Ministers of the Gospel, unto the Covenanted Reformation of the Church of Scotland, and to the present expediency of continuing to preach the Gospel in the fields, and against the present anti-Christian Toleration in its nature and design, &c. Given in to the Ministers at Edinburgh, by Mr. James Renwick, upon the 17th Jan. 1688. And Mr. Richard Cameron's Last Sermon; preached on Kype Water in Evandale, July 18th, 1680, three days before he was killed at Airs-moss. (Pittsburgh: Printed for David Reed, by Eichbaum & Johnston, 1824), 1884 edition.
    Wherefore seeing we also are compassed about with so great a cloud of witnesses, let us lay aside every weight, and the sin which doth so easily beset us, and let us run with patience the race that is set before us, Looking unto Jesus the author and finisher of our faith; who for the joy that was set before him endured the cross, despising the shame, and is set down at the right hand of the throne of God. (Hebrews 12:1,2)
    "Presbyterian Covenanter martyrs of Scotland, their last speeches and testimonies. The first edition appeared in 1714, and as more material was collected it was added to the 15 editions that were printed over the next 100 years."
    "An amazing book compiled to show how -- and especially why (from their own dying testimonies) -- the Covenanters suffered, bled and died. These brave martyrs for Christ laid the foundation for liberty and truth in both church and state. They have much to say to us today . . . . Though the issues and ferocity of persecution (by the Popes, prelates, and Erastians), were more obvious during the times covered in this book, the message to contemporary Christians could not be clearer: we are involved in a life and death struggle. Few books are this moving or this edifying -- a real treasure! (658 pp., 1884 ed.)." -- Publisher
    The 1871 edition was praised by Spurgeon.
    A Cloud of Witnesses, 1871 edition, free online e-text. Original from Oxford University. Digitized Aug 31, 2006.
    http://books.google.com/books?id=4vMCAAAAQAAJ&dq=thomson+a+cloud+of+witnesses&ie=ISO-8859-1

    Todd, Adam Brown, Covenanting Pilgrimages and Studies (1911). Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #10.
    "This title was written after the two volumes, THE HOMES, HAUNTS, AND BATTLEFIELDS OF THE COVENANTERS. It represents the author's continuing studies and contains some new information regarding incidents and people noted in the earlier volumes. This is especially true concerning the portrayal of Alexander Peden. Others covered include Renwick, Cargill, Sharp, the Howies, and many more. The story regarding Samuel Rutherford's 'two witnesses' is classic Scottish lore. Official acts (e.g. the proceedings surrounding the signing of Covenants), martyrdoms, Declarations, battles, etc., are all covered." -- Publisher

    Todd, Adam Brown, The Homes, Haunts, and Battlefields of the Covenanters, 2 volumes.

    *Tweedie, W.K. (1803-1863, editor), Tweedie, Scottish Puritans: Select Biographies, 2 volume set, 568 pages and 552 pages. Alternate title: SCOTTISH PURITANS: SELECT BIOGRAPHIES, CHIEFLY FROM THE MANUSCRIPTS IN THE LIBRARY OF THE FACULTY OF ADVOCATES, ISBN: 9781848710160 184871016X 9780851519692 0851519695 9780851519708 0851519709.
    "This two-volume set is one of the great treasures of Scottish Christian literature. In quick succession, we meet such justly famous and revered figures as John Welsh, David Dickson, William Guthrie, and James Fraser of Brea, but also the lesser known and long forgotten, like the land-laborer of Carrick, John Stevenson. Here are the stories and reflections of men and women who, in times of great darkness, testing, and suffering, tasted what the author of Hebrews calls 'the powers of the age to come'. The 17th century was a dynamic period in Scottish church history, and yet many of its rich records lay hidden in privately owned manuscripts for two hundred years. It was only with the evangelical awakening of the 1840s that close attention was given to their publication, and a Society, formed for that purpose in Edinburgh, took the name of the historian, Robert Wodrow (1679-1734). On the 26 volumes thus published subsequent authors have depended heavily, and particularly so with respect to the two volumes originally entitled SELECT BIOGRAPHIES. In an era when Puritan literature is again being rediscovered their reprint is timely, providing as it does the opportunity to go back to first-hand sources. Here, for the most part, men and women live in their own words, or in the witness of their contemporaries. The 19th-century editor, William Tweedie, himself an evangelical leader, thought it worthwhile to be the editor of this rare material, and all who have possessed them endorse his judgment." -- Publisher "When published by The Wodrow Society, the editor claimed that the books would be 'storehouses and authorities for future biographers and historians' and so it has proved. Many of the well-known stories are obviously taken from these sources. . . ."

    United Societies, The Protestation and Testimony of the United Societies -- 1707. Alternate title: A PROTESTATION AND TESTIMONY AGAINST THE INCORPORATING UNION WITH ENGLAND.
    The Land shall not be Sold for ever. (Leviticus 25:23)
    Ephraim also is like a silly Dove, without Heart, they call to Egypt, they go to Assyria. (Hosea 7:11)
    http://www.truecovenanter.com/societies/united_societies_protestation_against_union_1707.html

    United Societies, Sanquhar Declaration. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available in James Brown, THE TESTIMONY PUBLISHED AT RUTHERGLEN, MAY 29. 1679.
    The Declaration and Testimony of the True Presbyterian, Anti-Prelatick, Anti-Erastian, persecuted party in Scotland. Published at Sanquhar, June 22, 1680
    http://www.truecovenanter.com/sanquhar.html

    Various, Renewal of the Covenants, National and Solemn League; A Confession of Sins; and Engagement to Duties; And a Testimony, as they were carried on at Middle Octarara in Pensylvania, November 11, 1743, together with an Introductory Preface, 1748.
    Psalm lxxvi. 11 [Psalm 76:11]. Vow, and pay unto the Lord your God. Jeremiah l. 5 [Jeremiah 1:5] Come and let us join ourselves to the Lord in a perpetual Covenant that shall not be forgotten, &c.

    Vincent, Thomas (1634-1678), Godlinesse in Principle and Conversation a Necessary Preparative to the Worlds Dissolution and the Escaping of Future Burnings / by Thomas Vincent, 1670.

    Walker, James, The Theology and Theologians of Scotland, 1560-1750

    Welwood, John, Heartwork, Assurance and National Judgment, an MP3 file. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Also found in SERMONS DELIVERED IN TIMES OF PERSECUTION IN SCOTLAND.
    "Although Welwood focuses on personal sanctification, searching out the differences between hypocrites and true believers, he does not leave national issues untouched. He shows how God's anger builds in the life of backsliding individuals, churches and nations and how sometimes faithful individuals are swept away in the deluge that ensues as God's wrath is poured out upon the earth. The situation in Scotland at the time of this sermon (c. 1678), provides a perfect example illustrating this point. The forces of Antichrist (Royalist and Prelatical), were hounding the faithful Covenanters and many were suffering (even unto death), on account of their faithfulness to second Reformation attainments and covenant engagements (in the battle for the crown rights of King Jesus). At this point Welwood seeks to comfort and strengthen those saints suffering under the hand of these wicked, persecuting, 'incarnate devils' -- as Welwood calls them. Occasional hearing, unlawful authorities in church and state and neutrality in the cause of Christ are all sternly rebuked. There is great edification here as this sermon encourages the Christian in his unrelenting battle against sin and defection (individually and in his duties relative to the church and state). This sermon is read (by Ruling Elder Lyndon Dohms), from the book SERMONS IN TIMES OF PERSECUTION IN SCOTLAND, BY SUFFERS FOR THE ROYAL PREROGATIVES OF JESUS CHRIST. Regarding the preacher, this arresting account of one of Welwood's last sermons is recounted in SERMONS IN TIMES OF PERSECUTION." -- Publisher

    Williams, Daniel (1643?-1716), The Advancement of Christs Interests the Governing end of a Christians Life a Second Sermon Preached Before the Right Honourable Sir John Shorter, Knight, Lord Mayor of the City of London at Grocers-Hall, January the 9th, 1687/8 / by Daniel Williams, 1688.

    Willson, James R. (1780-1853), and others, History of the Reformed Presbyterian Church: From the Year 1580 to 1643.
    Gives the history of early covenanters in America. David Steele and others left the communion sometime prior to the synod of 1841 in Utica, Ohio (p. 108). Notice "the alleged reason that the Synod had postponed its deliverance on voluntary associations," and they regarded the Synod as unfaithful to its duty.
    http://www.reformedpresbyterian.org/conv_resources.html

    *Willson (alt. Wilson), James McLeod (1809-1866), Some Reasons for Retaining the Westminster Confession as the Basis of Ecclesiastical Union. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #24.
    "Explains why the use of the Westminster Confession is one of the best ways in which to obtain godly ecclesiastical union. This booklet pays special attention to the biblical teaching regarding civil government and shows why changes to the original WCF (regarding this matter), has resulted, not surprisingly, in much ecclesiastical disunity. It also contains some interesting notes on the millennial power and glory that will be exhibited in both church and state 'in the day of the Lord's power.' Excerpted from The Original Covenanter and Contending Witness Magazine, (volumes 1:1-4).

    *Willson, James Renwick (1780-1853), Prince Messiah's Claims to Dominion Over all Governments: And the Disregard of his Authority by the United States, in the Federal Constitution, 1832. Alternate title: BIBLE MAGISTRACY. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #13.
    "Why treat thus all religion? Why disfranchise, by a solemn act the church of the living God? Is the benevolent, pure, holy, heaven born religion of Emmanuel, hostile to the happiness of the republic? Shall commerce, agriculture, the arts, literature -- all the other lawful pursuits, be countenanced, fostered, protected, and established on as permanent a basis, as possible and the true religion be put under the ban of the empire? But they say, let religion alone. Do they, however, adopt the laissez nous faire, in relation to manufactures and trade? No. We cherish all, but respecting the advancement of religion, Congress shall never do any thing. When the child is born, were the father and mother to say, laissez l'infant faire -- leave the babe to itself -- would that lie to act as a nursing father and mother? Surely no. There must be a far different kind of constitution among the nations, when the promise is fulfilled, that 'Kings shall be nursing fathers.' God Almighty says, in the text quoted above, that civil rulers shall nurse the church -- the Constitution says they shall not. Which is right? 'Ah! sinful nation, laden with iniquity.' God spares thee for the sake of his redeemed, that his moral subjects on earth may be, by the gospel of his Son, reclaimed from sin and rebellion -- that on the earth, through his own holy religion, he may expatiate the glories of redemption. The Constitution says religion shall be discountenanced by the Congress of the United States." -- James R. Willson
    Kiss the Son, lest he be angry, and ye perish from the way, when his wrath be kindled but a little. (Psalm 2:12). This book will go a long way to exposing the fact, as Willson writes, that 'ungodly men have occupied, and do now occupy, many of the official stations, in the government,' and that 'Tyrants are yet on their thrones, and unholy republics refuse to acknowledge Him (Christ -- RB), as Lord of all'." -- Publisher
    Willson, James Renwick (1780-1853), Prince Messiah's Claims to Dominion Over all Governments
    http://www.covenanter.org/reformed/2016/4/24/prince-messiahs-claims-to-dominion-over-all-governments-and-the-disregard-of-his-authority-by-the-united-states-in-the-federal-constitution
    Willson, James Renwick (1780-1853), Prince Messiah's Claims to Dominion Over all Governments
    http://archive.org/details/BibleMagistracyChristsDominionOverTheNations

    Willson, James Renwick (1780-1853), A Sermon on Civil Government, 1821. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #22. A Sermon on Civil Government
    http://www.covenanter.org/reformed/2015/8/18/james-r-willsons-sermon-on-civil-government

    Wilson, Daniel, Sir (1816-1892), Memorials of Edinburgh in the Olden Time. A Large Eye View of Edinburg in 1647, 2 volumes, 2nd edition.
    Includes 123 illustrations, 41 full page. These are artist's renditions of the city in 1647.

    Wilson, David, A Modest Apology for the Conduct of Seceders, in Refusing to Join in Christian Communion With Sectarians, Latitudinarians, etc., who Have Departed From the Purity of Reformation Once Attained to in These Kingdoms. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #27.
    "An exceedingly rare work published in 1773. Sets forth a strong case for separation from all bodies that are backslidden from the work of covenanted reformation, as it was attained during the days of the Westminster Assembly, and as set forth in the WESTMINSTER CONFESSION OF FAITH [1646] and its related documents (regarding the government, worship, doctrine and discipline of Christ's church). Denounces the 'detestable indifference or neutrality' of not maintaining covenant obligations, which bind all reformers, 'to endeavour the extirpation of all superstition, heresy, schism, and whatsoever should be found contrary to sound doctrine.' Also proves that there is no liberty or love that is contrary to God's Word. Maintains Christian charity throughout by distinguishing between loving the persons in error, and taking part with, or encouraging them in their sinful confederacies or actions. A great work on the subjects of purity, faithfulness and separation. It is in keeping with the sentiments expressed in the Reformed Presbytery's ACT, DECLARATION AND TESTIMONY which states: 'The first cry against the presbytery and its members was -- 'schism -- schismatics.' This charge was promptly and publicly met and refuted, by showing from the Scriptures, that schism -- 'is in the body,' 1 Cor. 12:26 [1 Corinthians 12:26]; and from the approved writings of our covenanting fathers, that 'sometimes to avoid schism, we must separate.' Our worthy ancestors knew better than to adopt the vocabulary of papal Rome. Besides, 'the majority making defection are the real separatists'. (Samuel Rutherford)" -- Publisher

    Wilson, James McLeod (editor), The Covenanter: Devoted to the Principles of the Reformed Presbyterian Church.
    "The Covenanter, a monthly in the interest of the pro-deacon position in the RPC. Edited by James McLeod Wilson. Merged with The Reformed Presbyterian, January 1863."

    Willson, James R. (1780-1853), Sermon on The Written Law, or The Law of God Revealed in the Scriptures, by Christ as Mediator; The Rule of Duty to Christian Nations to Civil Institutions
    http://www.covenanter.org/reformed/2015/8/18/james-r-willsons-sermon-on-the-written-law?rq=Public%20Covenanting

    Wishart, George (1513-1546), The Distinguishing Characters of True Christianity: and The Great Causes of all Corruptions of it. A Sermon, Preached in the High Church of Edinburgh, Before His Majesty's High Commissioner to the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland, at the Opening of the Assembly the 11th Day of May 1749. By George Wishart, M.A. one of the Ministers of Edinburgh.

    Witherspoon, Thomas D., Children of the Covenant.

    Wodrow, Robert (sometimes attributed to Robert Wodrow), Some Reasons Humbly Offered, why the English Oath of Abjuration, Should not be Imposed Upon the Subjects of North-Britain, Especially the Ministers of the Gospel There.

    *Wodrow, Robert (1679-1734), and Robert Burns (contributor), The History of the Sufferings of the Church of Scotland, From the Restoration to the Revolution, 1830-5, 4 volumes. Alternate title: THE HISTORY OF THE SUFFERINGS OF THE CHURCH OF SCOTLAND FROM THE RESTORATION TO THE REVOLUTION. BY THE REV. ROBERT WODROW, MINISTER OF THE GOSPEL AT EASTWOOD. WITH AN ORIGINAL MEMOIR OF THE AUTHOR, EXTRACTS FROM HIS CORRESPONDENCE, A PRELIMINARY DISSERTATION, AND NOTES, BY THE REV. ROBERT BURNS, D.D., ISBN: 9781599251868 1599251868 9781599251820 1599251825 9781599251837 1599251833 9781599251844 1599251841 9781599251851 159925185X.
    "Robert Wodrow (1679-1734), completed his Magnum Opus, THE HISTORY OF THE SUFFERINGS OF THE CHURCH OF SCOTLAND FROM THE RESTORATION TO THE REVOLUTION, in 1723-24. This work, for which his integrity, candor, liberality of sentiment, and talents, eminently qualified him, he contemplated from an early period of his life; but it was only in the year 1707, that he began seriously to labour on it. From this time, however, till its publication in 1721 and 1722, a period of between fourteen and fifteen years, he devoted all his leisure hours to its composition. On the appearance of Mr. Wodrow's History, which was published in three large folio volumes at separate times, in the years above named, its author was attacked by those whom his fidelity as an historian had offended, with the vilest scurrility and abuse. Anonymous and threatening letters were sent to him, and every description of indignity was attempted to be thrown on both his person and his work. The faithful, liberal, and impartial character of the history, nevertheless, procured its author many and powerful friends. Its merits were, by a large party, appreciated and acknowledged, and every man whose love of truth was stronger than his prejudices, awarded it the meed of his applause. Copies of the work were presented by Dr. Fraser to their majesties, and the prince and princess of Wales, and were received so graciously, and so much approved of, that the presentation was almost immediately followed by a royal order on the Scottish exchequer for one hundred guineas to be paid to the author, as a testimony of his majesty's favorable opinion of his merits. The warrant for the payment of this sum is dated the 26th April, 1725. In 1830, a second edition of the HISTORY was published, in 4 volumes 8vo, by Messrs Blackie and Fullarton of Glasgow, under the editorial care of the Rev. Dr. Burns of Paisley." -- Publisher
    "Robert Wodrow (1679-1734), Presbyterian minister and historian. He was an energetic researcher and acquirer of documents, letters, and anecdotes, all of which he put to use in his histories and accounts of the Presbyterian church in Scotland . . . Recently republished as a print-on-demand item." -- Wurth Books
    David Hackston of Rathillet's Account of Ayrs-moss.
    Excerpted from WODROW'S HISTORY OF THE SUFFERINGS OF THE CHURCH OF SCOTLAND.
    http://www.truecovenanter.com/history/hackston_ayrsmoss.html
    The History of the Sufferings of the Church of Scotland
    http://books.google.com/books?id=ykYRAAAAIAAJ&ie=ISO-8859-1&output=html

    Wylie, James A. (1808-1890), James B. Gillies, Disruption Worthies. A Memorial of 1843. With an Historical Sketch of the Free Church of Scotland from 1843 Down to the Present Time, 1881, 2 volumes.

    *Wylie, James A. (1808-1890), History of The Scottish Nation, in 3 volumes. Available (PROTESTANTISM IN SCOTLAND), on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available (PROTESTANTISM IN SCOTLAND), on Reformation Bookshelf CD #1.
    History of The Scottish Nation
    http://www.reformation.org/history1.html

    Wylie, James A. (1808-1890), Protestantism in Scotland (1878). Book 24 (illustrated), from Wylie's THE HISTORY OF PROTESTANTISM. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #1.
    "For the period covered by this book, Scotland went from a nation of uncivilized barbarians to national covenants with Christ, and then through many ups and downs as various factions tried to destroy true Christianity. From darkness to Hamilton, Wishart, Knox, and Melville, through to the Covenanters, the Westminster Assembly and the tragic deception used by Charles II, Wylie's racy style makes it hard to put this book down. Few other nations and periods of history provide such edifying reading. Highlights include Knox's call to the ministry, his interview with Queen Mary, his trial for treason, Melville's work, the National and Solemn League and Covenant, the civil war, the Westminster Assembly, and more." -- Publisher

    Wylie, James A. (1808-1890), The Scottish Reformation. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #17,

    *Wylie, James A. (1808-1890), Story of the Covenant and the Service of the Covenanters to the Reformation in Christendom and the Liberties of Great Britain, 1880. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
    "A fine historical introduction to the battle for Godly government and liberty against the forces of anti-Christian bondage (to national sin and Satanic deception). The Covenanters are responsible, more than any other group historically, for maintaining 'the crown rights of King Jesus' -- even at peril of severe torture and the loss of their earthly lives. Their covenanting principles are still the purest and most faithful form of Christianity known to man, and the revival of these eminently Biblical views are a sure hope for the future! For a more extensive 'Camerionian' treatment of this subject: Howie's SCOTS WORTHIES." -- Publisher

    Wylie, James A. (1808-1890), and James Begg, Tercentenary of the Scottish Reformation: As Commemorated at Edinburgh, August 1860.

    See also: The sovereignty of god, The doctrine of man (human nature, total depravity), The incarnation of our lord (the deity of the lord jesus christ), The lordship of jesus christ, Christ's kingdom, The all-sufficiency of christ, The commandments of christ, The person and work of jesus christ the lord (christology), The teaching of our lord jesus christ, The words of christ, The mediatorial reign of christ: the crown rights of christ, Justice, the theology of judgment, god's final judgment, the great white throne judgment, the day of the lord, The sovereign grace of god: his everlasting mercy and lovingkindness, Selection of covenant heads for positions of leadership, The application of scripture to the corporate bodies of church and state, God's deliverance of nations, Covenant theology and the ordinance of covenanting, The covenant of redemption, The covenant faithfulness of god, Church and state, Christ's influence on western civilization, Bible magistracy, Commitment, surrender, Loving and obeying god, Corporate faithfulness and sanctification, Covenant theology and the ordinance of covenanting, An introduction to the covenanted reformation, Background and history of the covenanted reformation of scotland, The covenanted reformation of scotland, The national covenant, The solemn league and covenant, Confession of national sin and covenant renewal, Sermons preached before governing bodies, The Reformed Presbytery of Scotland, Works of the reformed presbytery, The church of scotland, general assembly, Biography of covenanters, Acts of faithful assemblies, Testimony, testimony-bearing, The covenanted reformation of scotland author/title listing, Covenanting in america, The scottish covenanting struggle, alexander craighead, and the mecklenburg declaration, The reformed presbytery of america, and other smaller reformed associations, The works of David Steele, Oaths, ensnaring (vows, promises, covenants) and bonds with the ungodly, God's sovereign hand in history, A theological interpretation of american history, History, "his-story," Church history, The history of reformation of the church, Revisionist history, and so forth, and so on.
    TCRB5: 877-883, 2527

    Related WebLinks

    Calvin's Commentary on Hosea
    http://www.iclnet.org/pub/resources/text/m.sion/calvhose.htm

    Geneva Study Bible, 1599
    The 1599 Geneva Bible, Tolle Lege edition, online
    http://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=matthew%201&version=GNV

    *Singer, C. Gregg (1910-1999), John Knox, the Scottish Covenanters, and the Westminster Assembly (tape 3 of 5), [audio files], in a series of addresses History Notes on Presbyterianism, Reformation, and Theology by Dr. C. Gregg Singer on SermonAudion.com
    http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?SID=12607114250
    Works of C. Gregg Singer
    http://www.lettermen2.com/bcrr3ch.html#cgsinger
    The Topical Listing "A Theological Interpretation of American History"
    http://www.lettermen2.com/bcrr9chc.html#stiahis

    National Establishments of Religion
    "Hence it ought to be observed that something remarkable is here demanded from princes, besides an ordinary profession of faith; for the Lord has bestowed on them authority and power to defend the Church and to promote the glory of God. This is indeed the duty of all; but kings, in proportion as their power is greater, ought to devote themselves to it more earnestly, and to labor in it more diligently." -- John Calvin, Commentary on Isaiah (1550).
    http://www.covenanter.org/reformed/2015/6/29/national-establishments-of-religion

    Timeline: 1600 to 1640 Undiscovered Scotland: The Ultimate Online Guide
    http://www.undiscoveredscotland.com/usfeatures/timeline/to1640.html

    George Gillespie (1613-1648), Select Works
    http://www.covenanter.org/reformed/authors/george-gillespie

    Sermons Delivered in Times of Persecution in Scotland, by Sufferers for the Royal Prerogatives of Jesus Christ. Sermons and Lectures by Richard Cameron. Biographical Notice
    http://www.truecovenanter.com/cameron/sdtp_cameron_bio.html

    A Hind Let Loose; Or An Historical Representation of the Testimonies of the Church of Scotland. . . . by Mr. Alexander Shields, Minister of the Gospel, in St. Andrews
    http://www.truecovenanter.com/shields/

    Faithful Contendings Displayed, the Preface to the Understanding Reader, by John Howie
    http://www.truecovenanter.com/societies/faithful_contendings_displayed_preface.html

    A Cloud of Witnesses for the Royal Prerogatives of Jesus Christ: or, The Last Speeches and Testimonies of Those who Have Suffered for the Truth in Scotland since the Year 1680, Isabel Alison
    http://www.truecovenanter.com/reformedpresbyterian/cloud/cloud_alison_isabel.html?doc_banner_show=false

    The Reformation in England 1 of 2 (the Providential Historical Preparation for the Westminster Assembly)
    http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?SID=12607144153

    The Reformation in England 2 of 2 (and America)
    http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?SID=126071623510

    Great Moments in Presbyterian History #2
    Dr. C. Gregg Singer, Great Movements in Presbyterian History, 34 min.
    http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?SID=12160371538

    The Departure From the Puritan Heritage
    Dr. C. Gregg Singer, Puritan Heritage, 52 min.
    http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?SID=92903104657

    The Scottish Covenanting Struggle, Alexander Craighead, and the Mecklenburg Declaration
    http://www.lettermen2.com/craig.html

    Lectures on the Principles of the Second Reformation
    http://www.covenanter.org/reformed/2015/8/18/the-reformed-presbyterian-churchs-of-scotland-lectures-on-the-principles-of-the-second-reformation

    Works of David Steele (1803-1887)
    http://www.lettermen2.com/bcrr3ch.html#dsteele

    The Life, Correspondence, and Sermons of John Welch, Sometime Minister of the Gospel in Ayr
    http://www.truecovenanter.com/welch/index.htm

    Forty-eight Select Sermons Preached by John Welch: The Publisher to the Reader
    http://www.truecovenanter.com/welch/welch00_1_toreader.html

    Binning, Hugh (1627-1653), Select Works
    http://www.covenanter.org/reformed/2015/6/26/hugh-binning

    Thomas McCrie's A Statement of the Difference
    http://www.covenanter.org/reformed/2015/8/7/thomas-mccries-a-statement-of-the-difference

    McMaster, Gilbert (1778-1854) Select Works
    http://www.covenanter.org/reformed/2015/6/29/gilbert-mcmaster-1778-1854

    The Keys of the Kingdom of Heaven. A Sermon, Preached at the Opening of the Synod of the Reformed Presbyterian Church, Glasgow, May 1, 1816, by John Fairley, Minister of the Gospel
    http://www.truecovenanter.com/kirkgovt/fairley_keys_of_the_kingdom.html

    Church Government
    A listing of documents with e-text.
    http://www.truecovenanter.com/kirkgovt/index.htm

    Sermons and Lectures Commended to all Those who Desire to Have the Word of God Opened to Them not With Enticing Words of Man's Wisdom, but in Demonstration of the Spirit and of Power. (1 Corinthians 2:4)
    http://www.truecovenanter.com/sermons/index.html

    Highlander Clearance: Scots-Irish and the Clearances. The Movement of People Between Scotland and Ireland and Onward Emigration to North America, Australia, and New Zealand, Iain Kerr
    "I have been asked by a number of conventional correspondents and more recently contacts on the Compuserve Genealogy Forum to answer questions on the background to the emigration of Scots and Irish people to the Americas and beyond. These notes cover the main historical background to those movements. The attempt an approximately chronological outline of the major incidents which caused population movements in Scotland, from Scotland to Ireland and either directly, or through an intervening refuge, from Scotland and Ireland to the Americas and later Australia."
    http://www.rootsweb.com/~pictou/clearncs.htm

    Reformed Documents
    http://www.covenanter.org/reformed-documents/

    Draft of a Covenant for the Reformed Presbyterian Church in North America (published in Overture), 1848
    See particularly the "Editor's Introduction" which gives a summary history of covenant renewal in the Reformed Presbyterian Church.
    http://www.truecovenanter.com/reformedpresbyterian/rpcna_covenant_draft_1848.html?doc_banner_show=false

    Various Presbyterian Bodies, Minutes of the Reformed Presbyterian Church
    http://www.truecovenanter.com/reformedpresbyterian/minutes_rp.htm

    Covenanted Reformed Presbyterian Publications
    http://www.truecovenanter.com/publish/

    The American Colonist's Library. Primary Source Documents Pertaining to Early American History.
    An invaluable collection of historical works which contributed to the formation of American politics, culture, and ideals
    http://www.constitution.org/primarysources/primarysources.html

    A Short Account of the Old Presbyterian Dissenters, Section I: The Several Names, by Which the old Dissenters Have Been Known and Distinguished
    http://www.covenanter.org/reformed/2015/8/24/a-short-account-of-the-old-presbyterian-dissenters

    *Presbyterian Heritage Publications, Library of Presbyterian Heritage Publications and Protestant Heritage Press CD-ROM Library and Library of Presbyterian Heritage Publications and Protestant Heritage Press CD-ROM Library (Dallas, TX [Presbyterian Heritage Publications, P.O. Box 180922, Dallas, 75218]: Presbyterian Heritage Publications, 1999).

    Anti-Romanist Homepage
    http://www.covenanter.org/reformed/2015/6/29/romanism

    Reformed Online Library
    The work of Brian Schwertley.
    "The WPCUS [Westminster Presbyterian Church in the United States -- compiler], fully subscribes to the Westminster Standards . . . as they were originally adopted by the Church of Scotland (1645-1648), and the colonies of North America (1716)."
    They are the only Reformed denomination that has not adopted the American Version of the Westminster Confession of Faith with its declensions.
    http://www.reformedonline.com/view/reformedonline/s36p94.htm

    British Broadcasting Corporation, BBC2, A History of Scotland, part 6, God's Chosen People: The Covenanters
    "The first five parts of 'A History of Scotland' cut a swathe through from Roman times to the Stewart ascension to the throne of England as well as Scotland.
    "Now presenter Neil takes the story up from 1600s to the modern day in the remaining five parts of the series through times of international wealth and 20th-century industrial decline.
    "In the sixth of this 10-part series, the focus is on the Covenanters and a time, 1638-1688, when the country was riven with religious tension.
    "After Great Britain was founded, the Scots began to find themselves torn between their natural affinity to their ancient line of Stewart Kings and their intense religious conviction. Should they follow King Charles I or King Jesus? When Charles I tried to impose his form of religion on the Scots, they were forced to choose.
    "Entitled God's Chosen People, tonight's episode is about the forging and impact of two of the most remarkable documents in Scottish history which broke the power of the Stewart kings: the Covenants (of 1638 and 1643) -- written contracts with God in whichthe Scottish Covenanters sought not only to redefine their own place in Britain, but also Britain itself."
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/scotstom/sets/72157622638846841/

    Reformed Covenanter: An Old Light Covenanter blog
    "An internet sourcebook of Reformed and Covenanter thought, edited by Daniel Ritchie."
    http://reformedcovenanter.wordpress.com/

    Brown, John (of Haddington, 1722-1787), Toleration and Covenanting
    Apparently this is an review by Reg Barrow. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. http://www.swrb.com/newslett/actualnls/Tol&Cov.htm

    Anderson, John, Against Occasional Hearing on Proverbs 19:27, a sermon
    http://www.covenanter.org/reformed/2015/8/18/john-andersons-sermon-against-occasional-hearing-on-proverbs-1927



    The Church of Scotland, General Assembly

    Among the seventeenth century documents we find much (from both the church and the state) that relates to the central place that covenanting played in the second Reformation. We also find various authoritative international testimonies against Popery, Prelacy and Schism (i.e. Independency, Oliver Cromwell, etc.), and for biblical covenanted uniformity, divine right Presbyterian church government, and apostolic worship. -- Publisher of Official Acts, Declarations, Protestations, etc., Concerning the Covenanted Reformation

    Albeit there has been in the land, ever since the reformation of religion, some of all ranks who have been for a testimony unto the truth, and for a name of joy and praise unto the Lord, by living godly, studying to keep their garments pure, and being steadfast in the covenant and cause of God; and there yet continues to be some, though reduced to a very small number, destitute of outward power and ability, and other helps fit for the right managing of a testimony, wanting the countenance of civil authority, and having few to feed or lead them; who are, notwithstanding all these difficulties, labouring in the strength of Christ to keep the good old way of these faithful witnesses who are gone before, in bearing testimony to the truths of Christ. -- Solemn Acknowledgement of Public sin

    Bell, John, Church of Scotland, General Assembly, An Abridgement and Alphabetical Index of the Acts of the General Assemblies, of the Church of Scotland From the Year 1638, to 1706, Inclusive of Both. By a Minister of the Gospel.

    Brown, John (of Haddington, 1722-1787), The Psalms of David in Metre (being the Scottish Metrical Psalter, first authorized by the Westminster Divines and then also by the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland [in 1650], With Notes by John Brown of Haddington. Alternate title: PSALTER BY FRANCIS ROUSE, THE WESTMINSTER DIVINES, AND THE SCOTTISH GENERAL ASSEMBLY (FROM 1646-1650). Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #7.
    http://www.swrb.com/newslett/actualnls/Psalter0.htm
    The Psalms of David in Metre According to the Version Approved by The Church of Scotland The Scottish Metrical Psalter, includes audio accompanyment
    http://www.cgmusic.com/workshop/smp_frame.htm

    Brown, John (of Wamphray, 1610-1679), Hugh Binning (1627-1653), John Howie (1735-1793), the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland, and Sundry Ministers of Perth and Fife, Faithful Witness-Bearing Exemplified: A Collection. Containing, I. An Useful Case of Conscience . . . by Mr. Hugh Binning. II. A Solemn Testimony Against Toleration . . . by the Commissioners of the General Assembly, and by Sundry Ministers in . . . Perth and Fife. III. The History of the Indulgence. By Mr. John Brown . . . To Which is Prefixed, a Preface, Concerning Association, Toleration, and . . . Liberty of Conscience. Kilmarnock, 1783. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #8, #26.

    Church of Scotland, Covenantal Lawsuits of the Church of Scotland
    http://www.forerunner.com/champion/X0003_2._Scottish_Covenant.html

    Church of Scotland (Alexander Peterkin, editor), The Book of the Universal Kirk of Scotland. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
    "THE BOOK OF THE UNIVERSAL KIRK OF SCOTLAND contains the earliest official records (acts and proceedings) of the Established Reformed Church in Scotland, covering the period from 1560 to 1616.
    "Alexander Peterkin calls them 'the only sure and satisfactory memorials of the course of Ecclesiastical affairs in the times immediately succeeding the Reformation.'
    "Lee, Clerk of the General Assembly in 1828 writes (regarding the originals), 'there is no difficulty in proving that the volumes in question were laid on the table of the General Assembly which met at Glasgow in 1638; and that they were pronounced by that Assembly to be true and authentic Registers of the Kirk of Scotland.'
    "Concerning this copy of 'The Booke' ('for the first time fully printed from the copies in the Advocates' Library'), Lee further states that these records exhibit,

    The real character of the internal government of this national church. They display the operation of the principles by which the first Reformers and their immediate successors were actuated. They demonstrate that these men were not more distinguished by zeal for the truth, than by loyalty to the head of the government, attachment to true principles, (I do not say of toleration -- for that was a term which they certainly did not employ or approve -- of religious liberty and civil subordination.
    "They bear testimony to the strictness and impartiality of ancient discipline. They vindicate the character of those illustrious men whose names have been unjustly aspersed, but who, both by their doctrine and lives, -- by their unwearied exertions and their patient sufferings, -- left an example, not indeed or faultless excellence, but assuredly of the most noble, magnanimous, and fearless adherence to the standards of our constitution.
    "These Registers also contain much that is capable of correcting erroneous representations of historical facts with regard to the internal state of the kingdom -- institutions, habits, and customs, as well as the morals of the people, and the spirit which was most prevalent at particular periods in various districts of the land . . . they prove, that from the very first moment, it was the determined object of the leaders of the Reformation, to establish such a Presbyterian Government, as was at last, with the utmost difficulty completed . . . they deserve to be preserved with care, as the most venerable remnants of a distant age -- as the earliest annuls of our infant church . . . of confessors and martyrs, who counted not their lives dear to them; and who when they thought it necessary, never shrunk from sealing their testimony with their blood . . . (they) present the seal and superscription of glory to God, and good will to man -- peace to the church, and happiness to the state." (pp. xi-xii).
    "John Knox, the first name listed in the first record of the first General Assembly (in 1560), of course, plays a prominent role in much of what is recorded here." -- Publisher
    "Church of Scotland, Alexander Peterkin, The Booke of the Universall Kirk of Scotland: Wherein the Head is and Conclusion is Devys it be the Ministers and Commissionar is of the particular kirks thereof, are specially expressed and contained (1839)
    http://archive.org/details/bookeofuniversal00chur

    *Church of Scotland, General Assembly, 1638-1649, The Acts of the General Assemblies of the Church of Scotland, From the Year 1638 to the Year 1649 Inclusive, 1682. A Christian classic. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Also available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #11.
    "Exceedingly rare, these are the acts from what many consider the greatest general assembly gatherings since the days of the apostles. The work accomplished and ratified at these meetings has been called 'the most perfect model' of Presbyterial Church Government 'as yet attained.' Sitting during the momentous days of the Covenants (National and Solemn League), and the Westminster Assembly, this general assembly included the likes of Samuel Rutherford and George Gillespie. Judicially binding on covenanted Presbyterians (WCF 31:3), these Acts demonstrate how these godly leaders officially dealt with individual, family, ecclesiastical and civil Reformation (including national and international matters). Furthermore, it should not be forgotten that these rulings had major national and international ramifications in their day and that they still guide faithful Presbyterians at the close of the twentieth century (as terms of ministerial and Christian communion in the Reformed Presbyterian church). Moreover, they contain 'noble examples to be followed in testifying against all corruptions embodied in the constitutions of either churches or states.' (Reformed Presbytery, Act, Declaration and Testimony for the Whole of Our Covenanted Reformation, p. 216). Christ's Kingship has never since been so boldly and clearly proclaimed to the nations by a duly constituted general assembly -- neither has His rule and reign been upheld and actually embodied into the laws of a nation (civil and ecclesiastical), as it was during these days in Scotland. Much of this can be attributed to the work (humanly speaking), done by the ministers present while these Acts were debated and passed. Regarding doctrine, worship, government and discipline there are few books that will be as helpful -- especially to elders and those advanced in the faith. Additionally, if you want a glimpse at the heart of the Second Reformation this is one of the best places to look. It may also be considered 'the eye of the Puritan storm,' seeing that the Scottish Covenanters exerted such a godly influence among their English Presbyterian brothers (and the Westminster Assembly), during these days -- the two nations having covenanted with God (in the Solemn League and Covenant), for the international 'reformation and defense of religion . . . the peace and safety of the three kingdoms . . . the glory of God, and the advancement of the kingdom of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ, etc.' Over 500 pages and indexed for easy reference to all major topics." -- Publisher

    Church of Scotland, General Assembly, The Confession of Faith, and the Larger and Shorter Catechisms: First Agreed Upon by the Assembly of Divines at Westminster: and Now Appointed by the General Assembly of the Kirk of Scotland, to be a Part of Uniformity in Religion Between the Kirks of Christ in the Three Kingdoms. Together with the Sum of Saving Knowledge, and the Practical use Thereof.

    Church of Scotland, General Assembly, 1639, The Declinatour and Protestation of the Sometimes Pretended Bishops, Presented in the Face of the Last Assembly. Refuted and Found Futile, but Full of Insolent Reproaches, and Bold Assertions, 1639. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #10.
    "An exceedingly rare title marking the continuing rise, at critical juncture, of the covenanted Reformed Presbyterian church. Members of this General Assembly and signatories to this protestation include Samuel Rutherford, David Dickson, Robert Baillie and even James Sharp (who later apostasized to the camp of the Prelatical antichrist and persecuted [and murdered], the covenanters he once owned as brothers). This book refutes the charges of the prelates, while exposing their many errors (which included teaching Arminianism, Popery, conditional election, the power of free-will resisting effectual grace, that the Pope is not the Antichrist, that Rome is the true church [constitutionally], that worship is not regulated by the Word of God [the regulative principle], that the earlier reformers were deformers; and denying limited atonement, justification by faith alone, predestination, and a number of other revealed truths of Scripture.)" -- Publisher

    Church of Scotland, General Assembly, The Form of Process in the Judicatories of the Church of Scotland; With Relation to Scandals and Censures: To Which is Subjoined, Several Acts and Overtures of the General Assemblies . . . 1763.

    Church of Scotland, General Assembly, A Letter From the General Assembly of the Kingdom of Scotland: to the Right Honourable the Lord Mayor, Aldermen, and Common-councell of the City of London, June 18. 1646.

    Church of Scotland, General Assembly, The Principall Acts of the Solemne General Assembly of the Kirk of Scotland: Indicted by the Kings Majestie, and Conveened at Glasgow the xxi. of November 1638. Visied, Collected, and extracted forth of the register of the acts of the assembly, by the clerk thereof.

    Church of Scotland, General Assembly (author/compiler), The Psalter [microform]: Being the Authorized Version of the Psalms Together With Selected Passages of Scripture, and Ancient Hymns, Pointed for Chanting, With Accompanying Chants, for use in Churches / by Authority of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland (London and New York: T. Nelson and Sons, 1888).
    "Note: Psalms and tunes each on half-pages. Microfilm: Pitts Theology Library, Emory University, M2115 .H9 REEL 225."

    Church of Scotland, General Assembly, The Records of the Commissions of the General Assemblies of the Church of Scotland Holden in Edinburgh in the Years 1646 and 1647, 1892.

    Church of Scotland, General Assembly, The Records of the Commissions of the General Assemblies of the Church of Scotland holden in Edinburgh in the years 1648 and 1649, 1892.

    Church of Scotland, General Assembly, The Records of the Commissions of the General Assemblies of the Church of Scotland Holden in Edinburgh in 1650, in St. Andrews and Dundee in 1651 and in Edinburgh in 1652, 1909.

    *Church of Scotland, General Assembly, The Scottish Prose Psalter Being the Authorized Version of the Psalms With Selected Passages of Scripture, and Ancient Hymns, Pointed for Chanting, With Accompanying Chants. For Use in Churches, by Authority of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland, 2nd edition (London: T. Nelson and Sons, Paternoster Row, Edinburgh and New York, 1906). A Christian classic. Considered to be among the ten greatest books in the English language.
    "Since Christ is the Second Person of the Trinity, the hymns and laments of the psalms are directed to Him as to the Father and the Spirit. Jesus is both a singer of the psalms (Heb. 2:12 [Hebrews 2:12], Psalm 22:22), and the focus of their interest. We can sing to Him our praise, tell Him our complaints and petitions, and thank Him for His goodness. We extol Him as our King, rest our confidence in Him, and look to Him as the embodiment of God's wisdom." -- "The Book of Psalms," The Reformation Study Bible, pp. 754,755
    Have you ever planned to sing through The Book of Psalms with your spouse or with your family? Here is your psalter: THE SCOTTISH PROSE PSALTER.
    The writer knows of no psalter truer to the literal translation of the Word of God, short of pointing The Book of Psalms from YOUNG'S LITERAL TRANSLATION OF THE HOLY BIBLE, which preserves the Hebrew and Greek grammatical structure, or short of taking 15 years out of one's life to learn the original Hebrew and Greek, which, of course, is not necessary.
    This is a split-page psalter. The top set of pages are the music, the bottom set of pages are the Psalms. This format allows the worshiper to match any melody with any particular Psalm.
    The preface contains instruction on how to chant. Select chants are recommended for each Psalm.
    "Chanting is the singing of a prose text to a simple, repeated melody. Good chanting is essentially good reading aloud; it uses the rhythms and stresses of natural speech.
    "The ancient Hebrews never used metrical 'tunes' in the modern sense. In the synagogue, the Law, the Prophets, and the Writings (including the Psalms), were read in a sing-song recitation which was half speech, half song. Originally chanting involved only a single line (that is, no part-singing), and only two or three pitches. The early Christian church retained this practice, adapting it to the recitation of the Psalms in Latin translation. Our present system of chanting in four parts is called Anglican Chant, and dates from sixteenth-century England.
    "Chanting has several advantages over metrical Psalmody, stemming from the fact that in chanting, the music completely serves the text. The music is not difficult or interesting in itself, but has character and meaning only in conjunction with words. The meaning of the text is thus more immediate, and the parallel structure of the Hebrew poetry is more apparent. The difficulties of translating ancient non-metrical poems into sensible English rhyme are rendered unnecessary. Chanting encourages the use of entire Psalms rather than selections." -- "An Introduction to Chanting," The Book of Psalms for Singing, Synod of the Reformed Presbyterian Church of North America, 1995, p. 440
    A prose psalter was nothing new for The Church of Scotland. They published THE PSALMS OF DAVID IN PROSE AND METRE: WITH THE WHOLE FORME OF DISCIPLINE, AND PRAYERS, ACCORDING TO THE CHURCH OF SCOTLAND; THE PSALMS IN PROSE BEING OF THE LAST TRANSLATION; TRANSLATED BY THE SPECIALL COMMANDMENT OF KING JAMES THE SIXT, 1610 (Aberdene: Printed by Edward Raban for David Melvill, 1633).
    THE BIBLE PSALTER (London: J. Nisbet, 1880), 142 pp., Presbyterian Church of England, "the music arranged and partly composed by Sir Herbert S. Oakeley" (1830-1903), and THE PSALTER (T. Nelson and Sons, 1888), 303 pp., by Authority of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland, "pointed for chanting, and with chants adapted thereto or specially composed for this work by Sir Herbert Stanley Oakeley" preceded this work.
    "The Musical portion of this work is identical with that in THE PSALTER, AND SELECTED PASSAGES OF SCRIPTURE, etc., published in 1888; but advantage has been taken of a new issue to revise and improve the pointing of the words. To mark the Revised Edition the title of the work has been changed to THE SCOTTISH PROSE PSALTER, etc. . . ." -- Note to Preface, May, 1897.
    Publication of THE PSALTER, under the new title, THE SCOTTISH PROSE PSALTER, could have been a consequence of the awakening of 1905, "part of a worldwide movement and apparently especially inspired by British revivals. . ."
    Any concordance to the Authorized King James Version and any index to the Psalms of David (AKJV) may be used with this Psalter.
    Psalms are an essential part of personal devotions. There is a sincerity and beautiful simplicity about THE SCOTTISH PROSE PSALTER. Everyone should own a copy, especially fathers who lead family worship.
    The Scottish Prose Psalter, 1906 edition
    Online PDF file, print resolution (74 MB). It is recommended that a high speed connection be used to download the file.
    http://www.lettermen2.com/sppsalter.pdf

    Church of Scotland, General Assembly, A Solemn and Seasonable Warning: to the Noblemen, Barons, Gentlemen, Burrows, Ministers and Commons of Scotland: and Also to the Scotish Armies Without and Within That Kingdom / from the General Assembly, 12 Feb. 1645; and the Humble Remonstrance of the Aforesaid Assembly to the King, 13. Feb. 1645.

    Church of Scotland, General Assembly, and Robert Douglas (1594-1674, moderator), A Declaration or Remonstrance From the Kingdome of Scotland, to Their Well Beloved Brethren in England. Wherein is Declared, the Sense and Resolution of the General Assembly of the Kirk of Scotland, Touching the Kings Majesties Royall Person and Authority, in Preservation and Defence of the True Religion and Liberties of the Kingdomes. As also, their protestation touching the Solemne League and Covenant, and resolution to live and dye in the same. With their desires to their brethren of England. Subscribed in name of the commission of the General Assembly of the Kirk of Scotland, by M. Robert Douglas, moderator, 1648. Alternate title: A REMONSTRANCE OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF THE CHURCH OF SCOTLAND TO HIS MAJESTIE.

    Church of Scotland, General Assembly, and Alexander Henderson (1583?-1646), The Remonstrance of the Nobility, Barrones, Burgesses, Ministers and Commons Within the Kingdome of Scotland. Vindicating them and their proceedings from the crymes, wherewith they are charged by the late proclamation in England, Feb. 27. 1639.
    Notes: Drafted by Alexander Henderson. At end: Revised according to the ordinance of the Generall Assembly . . . 22 of March 1639.

    *Church of Scotland, General Assembly, and A. Ker, A Solemn Testimony Against Toleration and the Present Proceedings of Sectaries and Their Abettors in England, in Reference to Religion and Government: With an admonition and exhortation to their brethren there, from the Commissioners of the General Assembly of the Kirk of Scotland. With the return of the Honourable Estates of Parliament upon the said testimony communicated to them, and their occurence with the same; together with The paper of the 5. of Iuly, given by the Commisioners for the Kingdom of Scotland to the Speaker of the House of Commons mentioned in the aforesaid return. Alternate title: A SOLEMN TESTIMONY AGAINST TOLERATION AND THE PRESENT PROCEEDINGS OF SECTARIES AND THEIR ABETTORS IN ENGLAND, IN REFERENCE TO RELIGION AND GOVERNMENT, 1649-1650.
    "An exceedingly rare title marking the continuing rise, at a critical juncture, of the covenanted Reformed Presbyterian church." -- Publisher
    "Here Cromwell, the Independents and the Sectarian Army of England are rebuked by the Scottish General Assembly for their covenant breaking, declension and hindering the work of Reformation.
    "This book includes six separate documents, the final being 'An Answer from the Committee of Estates to a Printed Paper Directed to the People of Scotland, and Signed in the Name of Cromwell and His Officers'." -- Publisher
    Church of Scotland, General Assembly, Commisioners of the General Assembly, Kirk of Scotland. Testimony Against Toleration
    http://www.truecovenanter.com/anti_toleration/testimony_against_toleration.html

    Church of Scotland, General Assembly, Commission, A Declaration Against a Late Dangerous and Seditious Band, Under the Name of An Humble Remonstrance, &c.: Wherein the Plots and Projects of the Contrivers Tending to the Violating and Subversion of our Covenants; Raising and Fomenting of Jealousies, within this, and between both kingdoms; prolonging of the unnaturall wars; and, impeding the intended uniformity in religion, are discovered, 1648. Alternate title: A DECLARATION OF THE COMMISSIONERS OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY . . . CONCERNING PRESENT DANGERS, AND DUTIES RELATING TO THE COVENANT AND RELIGION, 1648.

    Church of Scotland, General Assembly, Commission, Scotland, Parliament, A Solemn Acknowledgment of Publick Sins, and Breaches of the Covenant: and A Solemn Engagement to all the Duties Contained Therein, namely those, which do in a more speciall way relate unto the dangers of these times. With two acts of the Commission of the General Assembly of the sixth of October, for renewing the Solemn League and Covenant. And debarring of persons accessory to the late unlawfull engagement, from renewing the Covenant, receiving the communion, and from exercise of ecclesiastick office, with their advice to Presbyteries for celebrating the communion. Together also with, an Act of the Committee of Estates of the fourteenth of October for renewing the League and Covenant. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #1-30.
    A Solemn Acknowledgement of Publick Sins and Breaches of the Covenant; and a Solemn Engagement to all the Duties Contained Therein
    http://www.truecovenanter.com/covenants/scotland_covenant_renewal_1648.html

    *Church of Scotland, General Assembly, Commission, and A. Ker, Good Counsell Come From Scotland: or, A Solemn and Seasonable VVarning to all estates and degrees of persons throughout the land: for holding fast the League and Covenant with England, and avoyding every thing that may prove a snare and tentation to the breach thereof: by the Commissioners of the Generall Assembly. Edinb. 19. Decemb. 1646. The Commission of the General Assembly ordains this warning to be forthwith printed, and that thereafter it be sent to Presbyteries; requiring them, immediately after the receipt thereof, to cause every minister of their number read the same distinctly, and explain it to their people upon a Sabbath day in their severall kirks, and that they report accompt of their diligence with the first conveniencie: appointing in the mean time, that to morrow the same be read in all the kirks of this city, A. Ker, 1646.

    Church of Scotland, General Assembly, Scotland, Parliament, A Declaration and Exhortation of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland to Their Brethren of England Bearing Date August. the First 1648. Also a Declaration of the General Assembly Concerning the Present Dangers of Religion . . . Together With Severall Papers of the Honourable Committee of Estates . . .

    Covenanted General Assembly of the Church of Scotland, Directions of the General Assembly Concerning Secret and Private Worship, and Mutual Edification, For Cherishing Piety, For Maintaining Unity, and Avoiding Schism and Division, 1647. Alternate title: FAMILY WORSHIP: MR. THOMAS MANTON'S EPISTLE TO THE READER OF THE WESTMINSTER CONFESSION OF FAITH AND LARGER AND SHORTER CATECHISMS.

    Covenanted General Assembly of the Church of Scotland, and Others, Official Acts, Declarations, Protestations, etc., Concerning the Covenanted Reformation, 686 pages. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
    "Contains 24 rare documents from the period 1638-1650. One document, 'The Act of Covenant Renovation' (1880) by the Reformed Presbytery (which was a faithful renewal of the National Covenant and the Solemn League and Covenant [adapted to the present time], with a confession of public sins), is added from outside this period to illustrate the continuing obligations that rest upon the moral person (civilly and ecclesiastically). Among the seventeenth century documents we find much (from both the church and the state), that relates to the central place that covenanting played in the second Reformation. We also find various authoritative international testimonies against Popery, Prelacy and Schism (i.e. Independency, Cromwell, etc.), and for biblical covenanted uniformity, divine right Presbyterian church government, and apostolic worship.
    "Military documents related to the second Reformation are also added. One proclamation by Charles I is even included, to illustrate Royalist opposition to Reformation." -- Publisher

    Henderson, Alexander (1583?-1646), and Church of Scotland, General Assembly, Parliament, The Scotts Declaration, in Answer to the Declaration, Sent Unto Them by Their Commissioners now at London, From the Honourable Houses of Parliament of England: Expressing Their Care to Prevent the Effusion of Christian Blood; and Their Affections to Reformation Both to Kirk and State, 1642.

    *Manton, Thomas (1620-1677), Family Worship: Mr. Thomas Manton's Epistle to the Reader of the Westminster Confession of Faith and Larger and Shorter Catechisms. Alternate title: DIRECTIONS OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY CONCERNING SECRET AND PRIVATE WORSHIP AND MUTUAL EDIFICATION FOR CHERISHING PIETY, FOR MAINTAINING UNITY AND AVOIDING SCHISM AND DIVISION (1646). Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #11.
    "Manton was a covenanted English Presbyterian (he swore the Solemn League and Covenant). He was also chosen to write the 'Epistle to the Reader' in THE WESTMINSTER CONFESSION OF FAITH, 1647 [1646], which speaks volumes as to his credibility among the preachers and scholars of his day." -- Publisher
    Mr. Thomas Manton's Epistle to the Reader of the Westminster Confession of Faith (1646) and Larger and Shorter Catechisms
    http://www.swrb.com//newslett/actualnls/famworship.htm

    *Mitchell, Alexander F. (1822-1899), Minutes of the Sessions of the Westminster Assembly of Divines While Engaged in Preparing Their Directory for Church Government, Confession of Faith, and Catechisms (November 1644 to March 1649), 1874, ISBN: 0921148291 9780921148296, 643 pages. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
    "Warfield states, 'The fundamental authority for the study of the work of the Assembly for the period covered by it is, of course, the volume of its Minutes edited by Drs. A.F. Mitchell and John Struthers.' This work was also called the best book concerning the Assembly by Gregg Singer. It was compiled from transcripts originally procured by a committee of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland. An invaluable aid for all those who love creedal Christianity, as it is revealed in the Holy Scriptures. A very rare resource that should contribute much to the ongoing Reformation. Indexed." -- Publisher

    Mitchell, Alexander F. (1822-1899, editor), with J. Christie, Church of Scotland, General Assembly, Commission, The Records of the Commissions of the General Assemblies of the Church of Scotland holden in Edinburgh in the years 1646-52, 3 volumes.
    Contents: Vol. 1. 1646-47; v. 2, 1648-49; v. 3, 1650-52.

    Mitchell, Alexander F. (1822-1899), and J.P. Struthers,Minutes of the Sessions of the Westminster Assembly of Divines While Engaged in Preparing Their Directory for Church Government, Confession of Faith, and Catechism (November 1644 to March 1649), From Transcripts of the Originals Procured by a Committee of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland, ISBN: 0837089573 9780837089577. (Appears to be an additional edition.)

    Peterkin, A. (editor), Covenanted General Assembly of the Church of Scotland, Records of the Kirk of Scotland, Containing the Acts and Proceedings of the Generals Assemblies, From the Year 1638 Downwards, as Authenticated by the Clerks of Assembly; With Notes and Historical Illustrations, by Alexander Peterkin (1838 edition), 648 pages. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #10 and #11.
    " 'The object of the present work is to present to the public, in a form that may be generally accessible, the history of one of the most interesting periods in the annals of our National Church, by the republication of the ACTS AND PROCEEDINGS, at and subsequent to the era of her Second Reformation; and, combined therewith, such historical documents and sketches as are calculated to preserve the memory of an important, and, ultimately beneficial revolution, notes Peterkin in his introduction. This is one the most valuable publications we offer related to Second Reformation history and the many important questions that were debated (and oftentimes settled), during this watershed period -- before, during and after the sitting of the Westminster Assembly. It also contains some indispensable information on the Protester/Resolutioner controversy (which reveals many valuable lessons for Reformed Christians today), including excerpts from some lost books and papers written by the Protesting Covenanters. The excerpts from James Guthrie's The Waters of Sihor, or the Lands Defectione, in which Guthrie enumerates the errors of the Resolutioners, as well as the marks of malignancy, is one prime example. Other rare Protester documents (inveighing against the 'pretended Assemblies' of the Resolutioners), signed by the likes of Samuel Rutherford and Robert Traill are also included. Very rare and very valuable -- a gold mine for the serious student of the Second Reformation!" -- Publisher

    Scottish General Assembly, The (Scottish General), Assembly's Letter to the Kirks in the Netherlands" (Edinburgh, June 4, 1644). Translated from Latin to English by Dr. Stephen Westcott.
    The (Scottish General), Assembly's Letter to the Kirks in the Netherlands" (Edinburgh, June 4, 1644). http://www.swrb.com/newslett/actualnls/ScotGADu.htm

    *Westminster Assembly (1643-1652), The Form of Presbyterial Church Government. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #18. Available in THE WESTMINSTER CONFESSION OF FAITH (1646).
    Form of Presbyterian Church Government
    http://www.covenanter.org/reformed/documents/the-form-of-presbyterial-church-government

    Wood, James (1608-1664), A Vindication of the Freedom and Lawfulnes of the Generall Assembly Begun at St. Andrews and Continued at Dundee: in Answer to the Reasons Alledged Against the Same in the Protestation and Declinatore Given in at St. Andrews, and in another paper contrived since, and spread abroad amongst such as were conceived more inclinable to follow that way, but kept up from others, now published by a lover of the Church of Scotland, for preventing and removing prejudices and misrepresentations which some emissaries have endeavoured to possesse us with here, who are strangers to the true estate of the late differences there, by dispersing papers against the judicatories of that church, and disseminating calumnies against their brethren and countrymen. Alternate title: A VINDICATION OF THE FREEDOM AND LAWFULNESS OF THE LATE GENERAL ASSEMBLY BEGUN AT ST. ANDREWS AND CONTINUED AT DUNDEE, 1652.

    See also: Background, foundation, and history of the covenanted reformation of scotland, An introduction to covenanted reformation, Unity and uniformity in the visible church: unity in the truth, The westminster confession of faith (1646, westminster standards) and related works, the westminster assembly, Covenant theology and the ordinance of covenanting, The mediatorial reign of christ and the crown rights of christ, The covenanted reformation of scotland author/title listing, The reformed presbytery of america, and other smaller reformed associations, Biography of covenanters, Politics, Reform of the church, The courts and the law base, Bible magistracy turns back the wrath of god, National establishment of religion: establishmentarianism, and so forth, and so on.

    Related WebLinks

    The Westminster Confession of Faith (1647, Westminster Standards) and Related Works, The Westminster Assembly
    http://www.lettermen2.com/bcrr9chc.html#wstandards

    Commentaries on the Westminster Standards (Westminster Confession, Larger Catechism, and Shorter Catechism)
    http://www.lettermen2.com/bcrr3ch.html#cwswcsc

    MacMillan and MacNeil, MacMillan and MacNeil's Protestation to a Commission of General Assembly
    http://www.truecovenanter.com/mcmillan/mackmillan_mackneil_declinature1708.html



    An Introduction to the Covenanted Reformation

    The prophets are advocates for God in a covenantal lawsuit. For their arguments for the continued obligation of covenantal faithfulness and the hope of God's covenantal faithfulness see:
  • Isaiah, a covenant prosecutor,
  • Jeremiah's theme of judgment for covenant breaking,
  • The themes of the wrath, severity, covenant faithfulness, trustworthiness, and ultimate goodness of God in the book of Lamentations,
  • Ezekiel's message of judgment against Israel, then judgment against foreign nations, and then grace and mercy to Israel, and the themes of the holiness, transcendence, grace, mercy, and sovereignty of God along with individual responsibility,
  • Daniel, the covenant head, with his theme of the absolute sovereignty of God in the affairs of man,
  • Hosea's theme of covenant relationship,
  • Joel's themes of covenant, the day of the Lord, and repentance unfeigned,
  • Amos furthering the prosecution's case for the covenantal lawsuit with themes of idolatry and social injustice,
  • The emphasis on God's sovereign justice by Obadiah,
  • Jonah's themes of the sovereignty of God and the universality of God's goodness,
  • The themes of Micah, covenant relationship, salvation is of the Lord, the church rebellious and perverse, and judgment followed by restoration,
  • Nahum's theme of God's government of history according to his covenant,
  • Habakkuk, the forefather of the Reformation, and his themes of God is sovereign in history and persistence in prayer,
  • Zephaniah's themes of covenant, the day of the Lord, and the restorative nature of God's wrath,
  • Haggai's theme of covenant,
  • Zechariah's themes of the presence, kingship and deliverance of God and Christ, and Christ dwelling among his people, and
  • Malachi, another advocate of God in the covenant lawsuit, with his themes of the continued obligation of covenantal faithfulness, and hope.
  • A doctrine once held to be important by early Presbyterians and most Puritans that, today, is largely forgotten and even held in disrepute is social or national covenanting. The Presbyterians of the First and Second Reformation periods of Scotland were so dedicated to socio-religious covenanting as a biblical tool for reformation and solidifying national religious attainments that they came to be called Covenanters. They took seriously Jesus' command to disciple whole nations (cf. Matthew 28:18-20). They believed that this Commission is not fulfilled until every nation bows the knee to Christ and covenants with Him. The Puritans understood that the Bible presents Israel, including its covenant and covenant law code (excluding any laws that have been abrogated or set out of gear by the death of Christ), as a model for all nations (cf. Deuteronomy 4:5-8). The gospel of Jesus Christ is to transform individuals and even whole cultures and nations. It should result in progressive sanctification in society as people learn all that Christ has commanded. When the majority of people are committed to the Lord, they will formally recognize the Redeemer in their constitutions; will establish the true Christian religion on a national and local level; and will seek to base all their laws on the law of God revealed in Scripture.
    In the book Rev. Schwertley not only sets forth the biblical case for social or national covenanting in a simple, organized and comprehensive manner, but also critiques the modern Presbyterian alternative to the original Presbyterian teaching on this and related topics. -- Publisher, National Covenanting and Christ's Victory Over the Nations

    In the final analysis, all modern ills, spiritual and temporal, are traceable to our continuing departure from the principles of the Second Reformation. . . . In particular, I am convinced that the Lord will not bless a church at peace with his enemies. Our departure from truth has led to our undernourished condition as a church; truth, as Thornwell argued, is the only food that the soul can digest.
    It does no good to blame society or the church for our deficiencies before the Lord because Christ holds men, not churches and states, accountable. In the words of Hugh Miller, "Churches, however false and detestable, are never to be summoned to the bar of judgment. . . . To Christ, as his head and king, must every man render an account."
    The great heresy of our times is that all men are children of God. Those within the church have lost their identity as a people of God, united in spirit and purpose. We have adopted the half-truths of our fathers for which Judah faced punishment: Because they have despised the law of the Lord, and have not kept his commandments, and their lies caused them to err, after which their fathers have walked. (Amos 2:4b). Nevertheless, Christ loves his church, and he will see to it that his bride is prepared (Ephesians 5:27), for the great banquet. Base on the history of God's people, the needed corrections will result from either prayer or persecution, leading the people to renew their covenant promises. Let us pray that God's kingdom come, and let us covenant to fulfill our obligations to be his people. When persecution comes, let us pray that we would stand as firm as did the Scottish Covenanters. When covenanting comes, let us praise the Lord, for only in him will we stand firm. Let us ever strive to make it possible for our children to utter one of James Nisbet's praises, "O my soul! Bless and praise the Lord that I was born in a land where the glad tidings of the everlasting gospel are published and pressed with so much purity and plainness." This should be our prayer, Turn us again, O God, and cause thy face to shine; and we shall be saved. (Psalm 80:3) -- Edwin Nesbit Moore from the conclusion to Our Covenant Heritage: The Covenanters' Struggle for Unity in Truth as Revealed in the Memoir of James Nisbet (1667-1728), and Sermons of John Nevay (d. 1672)

    The State, considered in its corporate character, is A MORAL PERSON, with a moral standing and responsibility. It is not the creation of the so-called social compact or of the popular will, but a divine institution based on natural religion. It coheres by a moral and religious bond; and its rulers are the lieutenants of God. If the State is a moral person, capable of performing duty, of committing sin, and suffering punishment, which every one must own who traces the fate of nations according to the divine word, it follows that a nation, acting by its rulers, can accept Christianity and make a public profession of it as the national rule and guide. It had been held together previous to the recognition of Christianity by some form of religion however impure, without which it could not have existed. And the first duty of the civil ruler when brought in contact with Christianity and persuaded of its divine origin is to RECEIVE THE BIBLE AS A REVELATION in a national way. The immediate effect of this is that it constitutes the State a Christian State, and pledges it to purge out its previous religion in the same way as Pagan and Mahommedan nations constituted themselves, according to their false religions, or as the atheistic state was constituted, or rather attempted to be constituted, by the French Convention. A nation must have a religion, and the only question is, which it will adopt. And when Christianity comes to the nation, or to the family, it does not frown on either of these institutions, which also are divine in origin, but enters into them with an elevating purifying power, and sweetly coalesces with all that is purely human in both. These ordinances of God now became vessels by which Christianity is diffused. The national recognition of the Bible as a revelation subjecting the nation to its authority, though a great step gained, does not exhaust the nation's duty, as widely diverging views prevail upon the right interpretation of the Bible. The State must by the necessity of the case ADOPT A CREED which will commonly be prepared by the Church. The same duty that devolves upon an individual Christian confronts a Christian State, and it naturally appends the civil sanction to the Church's creed. It must distinguish between scripture truth and its perversion. The State, by the adoption of a creed, gives utterance to the self-consciousness of a Christian community. It confesses the Christianity it has adopted. . . . The nation, acting by its rulers, must needs adopt a creed, and so distinguish between truth and error in the confession which it makes. It must be Trinitarian or Unitarian, Protestant or Popish, Calvinistic or Arminian, by the necessity of the position. These diverging lines of profession cannot be ignored. More than that; the responsible rulers must proclaim a Christian constitution and adopt a legislation all through the nation's history upon the principles of revelation. A Christian State is competent to make the same confession of its faith that an individual makes." -- George Smeaton, The Scottish Theory of Ecclesiastical Establishments, pp. 4-6

    One of the most common and popular objections to the distinctive principles of Covenanters', and their singular position is, that they are impracticable. Indeed there is a sense, and a Scriptural sense too, in which this objection is true. Paul says. We are not sufficient of ourselves to think anything as of ourselves, 2 Cor. iii:5 [2 Corinthians 3:5]; and Christ himself says, Without (separated from), me ye can do nothing, John xv:5 [John 15:5]; and both speak of Christians. It was when we were without strength that Christ died for the ungodly, Rom. v:6 [Romans 5:6]. If these primary and fundamental principles of the Bible were more generally understood and believed, Covenanters' principles and position would cease to be peculiar. Indeed without a heartfelt and humbling sense of man's guilt, depravity and utter helplessness, neither Christ's death nor life has any rational significance.
    The question, however, is not whether the distinctive principles of Covenanters be susceptible of application; but, are they Scriptural? If they are agreeable to the word of God, it is every one's duty to profess as well as to believe them. God does not anywhere promise to relax the claims of his law to accommodate it to man's inability. The Author of the law, well knowing that the convicted sinner would strive to stifle his convictions by a groundless hope of some relaxation of the law in his case, forever extinguished all ground of such vain hope when he publicly declared, I came not to destroy the law, but to fulfil, Matt. v:17 [Matthew 5:17]. Indeed to relax the law in accommodation to the necessities of either believer or unbeliever would involve its destruction. Who may not perceive the absurdity of this supposed accommodation of the moral law to the supposed ability of saint or sinner, when reflecting for a moment on the course of civil law. In vain would be the plea of any criminal that he could not refrain from theft, burglary, adultery, murder, &c., or that the law was too strict, the penalty too severe. To ask such questions is in effect to answer them. No, every genuine son of Abraham will concur in sentiment with his progenitor, that the judge of all the earth doeth right; that God is not unrighteous when he taketh vengeance, Rom. iii:5 [Romans 3:5]: that death eternal is the just wages of sin, Rev. xix:2,3 [Revelation 19:2,3]. It follows from these obvious principles that the "Governmental System," invented by some divines, and very congenial to many carnal minds -- that man's responsibility is limited to his ability, is a "delusion and a snare;" in its tendency subversive of all moral order, and at war with the incontestable sovereignty of the Most High -- He must reign, 1 Cor. xv:25 [1 Corinthians 15:25].
    With sincere pleasure we admit that some other denominations agree with the Covenanters in adhering to the foregoing principles, -- "we differ only in applying them." That word, only, though small to the eye, is pregnant with meaning. The history of the church general, and especially of the Reformed Presbyterian Church, demonstrates the vast difference between a joint acknowledgment of the soundness of a principle and the mode of its application; and the vastness of the difference is comprised in the diverse interpretations given to this little word only. The import of this word may be largely and easily illustrated as follows: For hundreds of years Christians in surrounding communities while in social and friendly intercourse with Covenanters, have often made such concessions as these, "Your principles are right, only they do not suit these times; they are scriptural, and therefore we believe them ourselves as well as you, only in the present state of the churches and the world, we do not see how they can be carried out; just now they seem to be impracticable." Christian people who often make such concessions, will also express their joyful anticipations of the Millennium; and they will express their firm belief that "Covenanter principles will then be popular," &c. These and the like concessions from pious people have doubtless been all along very agreeable to the ears of Covenanters, and have contributed to confirm them in their position, as also to comfort them amid privations and reproaches; only they cannot but regret that such good people have not the fortitude to act out their acknowledged convictions.
    How then is the millennium to be introduced? Must we await a new revelation? that "new law" of which we often hear? one accommodated to our weakness? No, we have no warrant to expect another law different from the decalogue, nor is any other demanded even by those who object to the position of Covenanters. They admit that the Bible we have, and the peculiar principles by which Reformed Presbyterians are distinguished from all others will be exactly suitable to the time of the millennium. If practicable then, why not now? This is the true cause why the millennium is delayed. Until the law in the hand of the Spirit gives such strength to sin that it (sin) shall slay the sinner, leaving the Christian as helpless as the impracticable, Rom. vii:9 [Romans 7:9], Ezek. xvi:5 [Ezekiel 16:5]. Every command of God to the sinner is an impossibility to him, altogether impracticable; and when he finds it so, he is prepared to take hold of God's covenant. Then all the moral law becomes practicable, Phil. v:13 [Philippians 5:13]. Nothing but the "body of death" renders obedience to the law in Christ's hand impracticable. -- "Impracticable," an article in The Original Covenanter, March, 1882, Vol. III, No. 5, found in the The Original Covenanter Magazine, Volumes 3:1 -- 3:16, from March 1881 to December 1884. Edited by David Steele, pp. 145-148

    Then, when he had expatiated somewhat more fully, and had more copiously illustrated the benefits of its presence [harmony -- compiler], and the ruinous effects of its absence upon a state, Pilus, one of the company present at the discussion, struck in and demanded that the question should be more thoroughly sifted, and that the subject of justice should be freely discussed for the sake of ascertaining what truth there was in the maxim which was then becoming daily more current, that "the republic cannot be governed without injustice." Scipio expressed his willingness to have this maxim discussed and sifted, and gave it as his opinion that it was baseless, and that no progress could be made in discussing the republic unless it was established, not only that this maxim, that "the republic cannot be governed without injustice," was false, but also that the truth is, that it cannot be governed without the most absolute justice. And the discussion of this question, being deferred till the next day, is carried on in the third book with great animation. For Pilus himself undertook to defend the position that the republic cannot be governed without injustice, at the same time being at special pains to clear himself of any real participation in that opinion. He advocated with great keenness the cause of injustice against justice, and endeavored by plausible reasons and examples to demonstrate that the former is beneficial, the latter useless, to the republic. Then, at the request of the company, Lælius attempted to defend justice, and strained every nerve to prove that nothing is so hurtful to a state as injustice; and that without justice a republic can neither be governed, nor even continue to exist.
    When this question has been handled to the satisfaction of the company, Scipio reverts to the original thread of discourse, and repeats with commendation his own brief definition of a republic, that it is the weal of the people. "The people" he defines as being not every assemblage or mob, but an assemblage associated by a common acknowledgment of law, and by a community of interests. Then he shows the use of definition in debate; and from these definitions of his own he gathers that a republic, or "weal of the people," then exists only when it is well and justly governed, whether by a monarch, or an aristocracy, or by the whole people. But when the monarch is unjust, or, as the Greeks say, a tyrant; or the aristocrats are unjust, and form a faction; or the people themselves are unjust, and become, as Scipio for want of a better name calls them, themselves the tyrant, then the republic is not only blemished (as had been proved the day before), but by legitimate deduction from those definitions, it altogether ceases to be.
    Tully [Cicero -- compiler], himself, too, speaking not in the person of Scipio or any one else, but uttering his own sentiments, uses the following language in the beginning of the fifth book, after quoting a line from the poet Ennius, in which he said, "Rome's severe morality and her citizens are her safeguard." "This verse," says Cicero, "seems to me to have all the sententious truthfulness of an oracle. For neither would the citizens have availed without the morality of the community, nor would the morality of the commons without outstanding men have availed either to establish or so long to maintain in vigor so grand a republic with so wide and just an empire. Accordingly, before our day, the hereditary usages formed our foremost men, and they on their part retained the usages and institutions of their fathers. But our age, receiving the republic as a chef-d'oeuvre of another age which has already begun to grow old, has not merely neglected to restore the colors of the original, but has not even been at the pains to preserve so much as the general outline and most outstanding features. For what survives of that primitive morality which the poet called Rome's safeguard? It is so obsolete and forgotten, that, far from practising it, one does not even know it. And of the citizens what shall I say? Morality has perished through poverty of great men; a poverty for which we must not only assign a reason, but for the guilt of which we must answer as criminals charged with a capital crime. For it is through our vices, and not by any mishap, that we retain only the name of a republic, and have long since lost the reality. . . ."
    For I mean in its own place to show that -- according to the definitions in which Cicero himself, using Scipio as his mouthpiece, briefly propounded what a republic is, and what a people is, and according to many testimonies, both of his own lips and of those who took part in that same debate -- Rome never was a republic, because true justice had never a place in it. But accepting the more feasible definitions of a republic, I grant there was a republic of a certain kind, and certainly much better administered by the more ancient Romans than by their modern representatives. But the fact is, true justice has no existence save in that republic whose founder and ruler is Christ, if at least any choose to call this a republic; and indeed we cannot deny that it is the people's weal.
    But if perchance this name, which has become familiar in other connections, be considered alien to our common parlance, we may at all events say that in this city is true justice; the city of which Holy Scripture says, "Glorious things are said of thee, O city of God." -- Augustine in The City of God, Book 2, Chapter 21, "Cicero's Opinion of the Roman Republic"
    City of God, St. Augustine, Book II. Chapter 21. -- Cicero's Opinion of the Roman Republic.
    http://www.ccel.org/ccel/schaff/npnf102.iv.II_1.21.html

    So many times people in the pew and the pulpit say, well how did all this get started? How did psychology descend to its present level? . . . How did political science produce our political thought, produce the dictatorships which are engulfing the modern world? Why are we in the economic mess in which we are today? Why is sociology such a jumble of immorality? Why is education as it is today? Why is art so meaningless? . . . Why is modern music an affront to the modern ears as well as to the mind and ear of God? . . . Why are all these things!? . . .
    I would suggest to you that if you will follow this course with thought and care, you will finally come to see the answer to the questions which haunt us today in Western society." -- Singer, C. Gregg (1910-1999), in the Apologetics lecture series using FROM RATIONALISM TO IRRATIONALITY: THE DECLINE OF THE WESTERN MIND FROM THE RENAISSANCE TO THE PRESENT (1979) as the text, and delivered in Decatur, Georgia, beginning November, 1979.
    Apologetics: #01: Classical and Medieval Thought #1
    Dr. C. Gregg Singer, Apologetics, 56 min.
    http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?SID=2250511453

    *Barrow, Gregory, The Covenanted Reformation Defended Against Contemporary Schismatics, 318 pages. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #1, #19, #23, #27.
    "A primer for the Covenanted Reformation, this is the best starting point for the new reader. It organizes the hundreds of Covenanted Reformation reprints into a logical defense of the theological landmarks established by our forefathers, with copious bibliographic references, many to e-text. An extraordinary document.
    "Unsurpassed on points related to the Lord's supper and covenanting (as set forth by the best Reformers and best Reformed churches). Especially strong on citations from Calvin and the Westminster Assembly. Deals with many foundational aspects of the Covenanted Reformation (which gave us the Westminster Standards and the Solemn League and Covenant), from numerous original source documents (from the Westminster Assembly's advice to the English Parliament on the Lord's Supper to the official records of Calvin's Covenanting in Geneva). Comprehensive and compelling, this is a shocking (and sometimes advanced), look at what really took place during both the first and second Reformations -- with extensive quotations from the writings of the major Reformers (not just quotes from what others have written about them). It conclusively and irrefutably demonstrates that those churches which today call themselves Presbyterian (and even many which claim a more general Reformed heritage), have seriously departed from the Scriptural standards, principles and worship of these previous Spirit-led Reformations. It is written in an easy-to-read and easy-to-understand format and is an unsurpassed work that should not be missed by anyone interested in real Reformation in our day. This is without a doubt the best book to read if you want to understand what it means to be a Covenanter and to walk in the blood-stained footsteps of the witnessing church (Christ's Covenanted and Reformed flock), (Song of Solomon 1:8)!" -- Publisher
    Publisher's Preface to The Covenanted Reformation Defended Against Contemporary Schismatics
    http://www.swrb.com/newslett/actualnls/pub_pref.htm
    Eschewing Ecclesiastical Tyranny (Protestant Biblical Separation)
    "1 Corinthians 2:15. The classic Reformation position on biblical separation, Protestant private judgment, the visible church, etc. -- contra Antichrist (the Papacy), and wayward liberal Protestants. This is Appendix G from THE COVENANTED REFORMATION DEFENDED: 'A brief examination of Mr. Bacon's principles regarding the visible church and the use of private judgment. Also, some observations regarding his ignoble attack upon Mr. Kevin Reed in his book entitled The Visible Church in the Outer Darkness'." -- Publisher
    The Covenanted Reformation Defended, e-text
    http://www.swrb.com/newslett/actualnls/CovRefGB.htm
    The Covenanted Reformation Defended, audio files
    http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?sermonID=7702201426
    The Covenanted Reformation Defended Against Contemporary Schismatics: A Response and Antidote Primarily to the Neopresbyterian Malignancy and Misrepresentations and the Manufactured 'Steelite' Controversy, Found in Richard Bacon's "A Defense Departed . . ."
    http://books.google.com/books?id=LG5EHQAACAAJ&ie=ISO-8859-1&output=html

    Black, John (1768-1849), Church Fellowship. A Sermon Preached at the Opening of the Synod of the Reformed Presbyterian Church, Philadelphia, May 16, 1816.
    Church Fellowship, John Black
    http://www.covenanter.org/JBlack/ChurchFellowship/sermon.htm

    *Brown, John (of Haddington, 1722-1787), The Absurdity and Perfidy of All Authoritative Toleration of Gross Heresy, Blasphemy, Idolatry, Popery, in Britain. In two letters to a friend in which the doctrine of the Westminster Confession of Faith [1646] relative to Toleration of a False Religion, and the power of the civil magistrate about sacred matters; and the nature, origin, ends and obligation of the National Covenant and Solemn League are candidly represented and defended, 1797. Alternate title: A COMPEND OF THE LETTERS OF THE REV. JOHN BROWN, LATE MINISTER OF THE GOSPEL IN HADDINGTON: ON AUTHORITATIVE TOLERATION OF GROSS HERESY, BLASPHEMY, IDOLATRY, POPERY IN BRITAIN, AND ON NATIONAL COVENANTING; IN WHICH THE DOCTRINE OF THE WESTMINSTER CONFESSION OF FAITH . . . AND OF THE NATIONAL COVENANT AND SOLEMN LEAGUE ARE CANDIDLY REPRESENTED AND DEFENDED, 1797, and "REFORMATION ATTAINMENTS VERSUS BACKSLIDING RELIGIOUS PROFESSORS," appears to be an excerpt. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #7, #25, #26.
    The Absurdity and Perfidy of all Authoritative Toleration of Gross Heresy, Blasphemy, Idolatry, Popery, in Britain
    http://archive.org/details/absurdityperfidy00brow
    "Reformation Attainments Versus Backsliding Religious Professors (excerpt from THE ABSURDITY AND PERFIDY OF ALL AUTHORITATIVE TOLERATION . . .
    "Here Brown deals with three major Reformation attainments (anti-tolerationism, establishmentarianism and the obligations of lawful covenants as they biblically bind posterity), that Satan has always been especially concerned to overthrow -- in every major demonic move to open the floodgates of lawlessness, anarchy and misrule. Fletcher, in the preface to the 1797 edition, relates this truth as it comes to bear on various religious professors, stating, 'Papists were enemies to our covenants because they were a standard lifted up against their system of abominable idolatries. Episcopalians were enemies to them, because they were a standard lifted up against their anti-scriptural church-officers and inventions of men in the worship of God. Some Presbyterians are enemies to them in our day through ignorance of their nature and ends; and others through fear of being too strictly bound to their duty.' (cited in Johnston, Treasury of the Scottish Covenant, p. 486)
    "A History of Heresy
    "It is also interesting to note the long list of backsliders and heretics that often oppose one or more of these points. 'The ancient Donatists, a sect of Arian separatists, who appeared about the beginning of the 4th Century, seem to have been among the first who held out these opinions to the Christian world. Feeling the weight of the arm of power for their schismatical practices, by way of reprisal, they stripped the magistrate of all power in religion; -- maintaining that he had no more power about religious matters than any private person, and refusing him the right of suppressing the propagators of doctrines different from those professed by the Church, or the observers of a different form of worship. From them the German Anabaptists adopted the same views. Then the Socinians (i.e. an early form of Scripture-denying liberals -- RB), and remonstrant Arminians, whenever the magistrate ceased to patronize their cause. The English Independents during the time of the Long Parliament were the zealous supporters of the same opinions. In their rage for liberty of conscience, they formed the strongest opposition in the Westminster Assembly which the Presbyterians had to encounter. Through their influence that venerable body was much embarrassed (hindered -- RB), in their proceeding; and by their means (in collusion with that "Judas of the Covenant," Cromwell -- RB), certain passages of the Confession of Faith never obtained the ratification of the English Parliament. The English Dissenters of the present age are generally in the same views, especially the Socinians, the Arians, and the Quakers, who have most to dread from the Laws of the Land against their blasphemies. And who knows not that the high reputation of Mr. Locke as a Philosopher . . . has given these opinions such an air of respectability, that many youth in the Universities have been thereby inclined to embrace them?' (Preface, pp. vi-vii).
    "The Covenantal Hammer Smashing the Idols of our day
    "In our day the tree of toleration (and the anti-Scriptural principles which logically grow out of it), has spread its branches in ways that could have never been envisioned by those that took the first steps away from biblical and covenanted uniformity. What Brown is fighting against here is an error so foundational that when left unchecked it permeates all of society, cutting out the foundational roots that are necessary for all national Reformations. And if the foundations be destroyed, what can the righteous do? (Ps. 11:3 [Psalm 11:3]). Furthermore, as the preface notes 'liberty of conscience and of opinion' are 'the great idols of the day.' Here Brown takes out his covenantal hammer and smashes these idols with an inconoclastic zeal worthy of our earlier Reformed forefathers. This book is especially useful in answering the persistent fear and questions that always arise when these old Reformed views are discussed: that is, the questions dealing with religious persecution. Brown spends much time in clearing the Westminster Divines of such false charges, while also setting these controversial Reformed teachings on a thoroughly biblical foundation.
    "Westminster's View of the 'Everlasting' Solemn League and Covenant
    "Interestingly, in the section defending the continuing obligation of the National and Solemn League and Covenant, we also note that the Westminster Assembly considered the Solemn League and Covenant an 'everlasting covenant.' Brown cites the following as proof, 'That the body of the English nation also swore the Solemn League and Covenant, is manifest. The Westminster Assembly and English Parliament, affirm, 'The honourable house of Parliament, the Assembly of Divines, the renowned city of London, and multitudes of other persons of all ranks and quality in this nation, and the whole body of Scotland, have all sworn it, rejoicing at the oath so graciously seconded from heaven. God will, doubtless, stand by all those, who with singleness of heart shall now enter into an everlasting covenant with the Lord.' (p. 161, emphasis added). The footnote tells us that the words Brown was quoting were taken from 'Exhortation to take the Covenant, February, 1644.'
    "Our Modern Day Malignants
    "Brown also includes a helpful section on a point some modern day malignants are once again attempting to use to overthrow the biblical attainments of the Covenanted Reformation. This section shows that the 'the intrinsic obligation of promises, oaths, vows, and covenants which constitutes their very essence or essential form, is totally and manifestly distinct from the obligation of the law of God in many respects.' (p. 120)
    "Brown's Dying Testimony to his Children
    "Finally, we cite a portion of Brown's dying testimony to his children given in the introduction (p. xix). Such testimonies, from notable Christian leaders, often contain singularly pertinent charges to their hearers. (For another notable example of this see James Renwick's dying testimony, as he was about to be martyred for his adherence to the Solemn League and Covenant, when he recounts what was later to become most of the terms of communion in Covenanted Presbyterian churches. This testimony can be found in Thompson's A CLOUD OF WITNESSES FOR THE ROYAL PREROGATIVES OF JESUS CHRIST BEING THE LAST SPEECHES AND TESTIMONIES OF THOSE WHO HAVE SUFFERED FOR THE TRUTH IN SCOTLAND SINCE . . . 1680. Here are Brown's dying words to his children: 'Adhere constantly, cordially and honestly to the Covenanted Principles of the Church of Scotland, and to that Testimony which hath been lifted up for them. I fear a generation is rising up which will endeavour silently,' (O how prophetic!), 'to let slip these matters, as if they were ashamed to hold them fast, or even to speak of them' (as with many "reformed" publishers and preachers today, who dare not touch the topics Brown deals with in this book -- RB). 'May the Lord forbid that any of you should ever enter into this confederacy against Jesus Christ and his cause! This from a dying father and minister, and a witness for Christ' (Signed), 'John Brown'."
    "Do you Have What it Takes?
    "If you have the courage to compare the original Reformed faith with that which is often promoted under its name today (and in many ways the old Reformed faith bears little resemblance to the 'new light' Reformers and innovators of our day), then this is an ideal book to obtain and study." -- Reg Barrow
    Following are three works related to THE ABSURDITY AND PERFIDY OF ALL AUTHORITATIVE TOLERATION OF GROSS HERESY, BLASPHEMY, IDOLATRY, POPERY, IN BRITAIN by John Brown of Wamphray.
    1. Barrow, Reg, Calvin, Covenanting, Close Communion and the Coming Reformation, 1996, a book review of ALEXANDER AND RUFUS . . . by John Anderson, 1862. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
    "Shows how Calvin practiced covenanting and close communion and how the biblical view of these ordinances is intended to purify the individual, church and nation. Refutes the Popish, Independent and paedocommunion heresies -- as well as all views of open communion (so common in our day). Also argues that Arminians, anti-paedobaptists, anti-regulativists, and all those who openly violate the law of God (and are unrepentant), should be barred from the Lord's table -- as a corrective measure ordained of God for their recovery. Also demonstrates that those that would not swear to uphold the Geneva Confession (or 'human constitution,' as it was agreeable to the Word of God), of 1536 in Calvin's day were to be excommunicated and exiled from Geneva. This is Reformation History Notes number two." -- Reg Barrow
    Calvin, Covenanting and Close Communion
    http://www.swrb.com/newslett/actualnls/CalvinCC.htm
    2. Price, Greg L., Terms of Communion: Covenants and Covenanting, a series of 7 audio cassettes [audio files]. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
    "Explains and defends the fourth term of communion, which is 'That public, social covenanting is an ordinance of God, obligatory on churches and nations under the New Testament; that the National Covenant and the Solemn League are an exemplification of this divine institution; and that these Deeds are of continued obligation upon the moral person; and in consistency with this, that the Renovation of these Covenants at Auchensaugh, Scotland, 1712 was agreeable to the word of God.' Includes the studies offered separately on the National Covenant (2 tapes), the Solemn League and Covenant (1 tape), the Auchensaugh Renovation (2 tapes), as well as two introductory lectures (only available in this set), on the biblical principles related to the ordinance of covenanting, the descending obligation of lawful covenants, objections against covenanting, etc. Roberts, in his REFORMED PRESBYTERIAN CATECHISM, catches the spirit of this tape set in the following question and answer:
    "Q. May we not indulge the hope, that, in the goodness of our covenant God, and by the promised outpouring of his Holy Spirit, 'the kingdoms of the world' at large, and the British empire in particular, will dedicate themselves to God in a covenant not to be forgotten -- animated by the example of our covenant fathers exhibited in these memorable deeds?
    "A. Yes. We have the most cheering grounds for this blessed hope; for it is written, that the nations at large in the spirit of devoted loyalty, shall cry -- 'Come and let us join ourselves to the Lord in a perpetual covenant that shall not be forgotten': and it cannot be well doubted, that the death-cry of the martyred Guthrie has been heard on high, and shall be verified -- 'The covenants, the covenants, shall yet be Scotland's (and the world's -- RB), reviving.' (p. 151)
    "A thoroughly amazing set of tapes -- among our best!" -- Publisher
    3. Cunningham, John (1819-1893), The Ordinance of Covenanting, 1843. A Christian classic. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #3, #27.
    "This book is considered by many as the classic work on covenanting. 'The theology of Covenanting is here unfolded with a richness of scriptural research and a maturity of intellectual strength which would have made the grey eye of Peden glisten with delight. The treatise is a valuable addition to that solid theological literature of which the Reformed Presbyterian Church has produced repeated and enduring specimens, and stamps Mr. Cunningham as a distinguished disciple of the thoughtful and scriptural school of Mason and the Symingtons.' (Presbyterian Review [1844] as cited by Johnston, Treasury of the Scottish Covenant)
    "The author himself notes that 'prayer and the offering of praise are universally admitted to be duties of religion. The Scriptures announce a place among these for the exercise of solemn Covenanting . . . What the word of God unfolds concerning it, is addressed to the most resolute consideration of all, and is capable of engaging the most extensive and prolonged investigation. And yet, though none have found this subject, like all God's judgements, else than a great deep, still in meditating upon it, the ignorant have been brought to true knowledge, and the wise have increased in wisdom. The secret of the Lord is with them that fear him; and he will shew them his covenant. (Psalm 25:14). Mutual federal engagements, concerning things religious and civil, whether entered into merely by simple promise, or confirmed by the solemn oath, have been made from the highest antiquity to the present. The hostility to some such engagements, and also the proud disregard for their obligation, which have been evinced by some in all ages, demand a most careful examination into their nature and design . . . Furnished with the key of Scripture, approaching the subject, we are enabled to open the mysteries in which ignorance and prejudice had shut it up; and equipped with the armour of light shooting forth its heavenly radiance, in safety to ourselves we assail the darkness thrown around it, and behold the instant flight of the spirits of error which that darkness contains. Standing alone in beauteous attractions descended from heaven upon it, this service beckons us to approach it, and engages to connect extensive good with a proper attention to its claims. The observance, under various phases, is described in Scripture as an undisputed and indisputable reality.'
    "In this book Cunningham exhaustively covers the subject of covenanting in over 400 pages. He deals with the manner, duty and nature of covenanting (including personal and social covenanting), the obligation covenanting confers, how covenanting is provided for in the everlasting covenant, how it is adapted to the moral constitution of man and how it is according to the purposes of God. Numerous Divine examples are cited from Scripture and covenanting is shown to be one of the great privileges of the Christian life.
    "An interesting chapter covers 'Covenanting Enforced By the Grant of Covenant Signs and Seals;' which touches on circumcision, baptism, the Sabbath, the Priesthood, the new heart and the person and work of the Lord Jesus Christ. Furthermore, this book demonstrates how God's approbation rested upon Covenanters in former ages, how covenanting is predicted in prophecy, how it is recommended by the practice of the New Testament Church and at what seasons it is appropriate. The appendices touch on the relationship of covenanting to immoral and unscriptural civil governments, the Free Presbyterian Church of Scotland, the British constitution and the apostasy of the Revolution settlement.
    "Additionally, Cunningham acknowledges that the true church is 'bound by the obligations of the Church of God is past times' and is still obligated to pay what it has vowed to the Lord in those magnificent attainments of the second Reformation (the epitome of these attainments being embodied in the Solemn League and Covenant and the Westminster Standards).
    "If you are interested in the ordinance of covenanting this is the most extensive treatment you will find in one book. It is a gold mine of Scriptural references and should be read at least once by everyone who calls upon the name of Christ." -- Publisher
    "David Steele dedicated this work [NOTES ON THE APOCALYPSE -- compiler], to John Cunningham, author of THE ORDINANCE OF COVENANTING." -- Publisher
    The Ordinance of Covenanting
    http://www.covenanter.org/reformed/2015/6/29/ordinance-of-covenanting

    *Brown, John (of Wamphray, 1610-1679), Corporate Sanctification: Holding Fast the Attainments of Reformation. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #1. Available in OBSERVATIONS ON THE PUBLIC COVENANTS BETWIXT GOD AND THE CHURCH: A DISCOURSE.
    "An overview of the Covenanter doctrine of reformation attainments by one of the great Covenanter theologians. Helpful in dispelling false charges of Anabaptism and perfectionism laid at the feet of faithful Covenanters by schismatics. John Brown was one of Samuel Rutherford's best students." -- Publisher
    http://www.swrb.com/newslett/actualnls/attain.htm

    *Calvin, John (1509-1564), Calvin's Commentary on Isaiah, 4 books, published in 2 volumes in CALVIN'S COMMENTARIES (vols. 7, 8). Spine title: CALVIN'S COMMENTARIES, VOLUME VII: ISAIAH 1-32; CALVIN'S COMMENTARIES, VOLUME VIII: ISAIAH 33-66. A Christian classic.
    Several factors combine to make CALVIN'S COMMENTARY ON ISAIAH particularly significant.

    C. Gregg Singer states, in the Mt. Olive Tape Library series of lectures:
    I have a study ready for public -- well, not ready for publication, but hopefully someday, on Calvin's use of Augustine [apparently never published -- compiler]. There are at least 400 references to Augustine in John Calvin. Anybody who says that Calvin got his theology of the top of his head knows no Calvin. Calvin knew Augustine probably better than anybody else, including Luther. Calvin went back to all the Early Western Fathers. I would say that next to Augustine, his theology is based upon Bernard of Clairvaux and Anselm, and he had a higher respect for Saint Thomas Aquinas than many people are willing to admit. But he is in the Western theological tradition.
    Charles Hodge, in his SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY of three volumes, very often refers to Calvinism as Augustinianism, and you can see why. . . . [Charles Hodge], declares that you might as well call Calvinism revived and revitalized Augustinianism.
    Calvin's work is in four books, with a Scripture Index and a General Index. The Baker publication prints the four books in two volumes.
    Calvin, Jean (John, 1509-1564), Commentary on the Book of the Prophet Isaiah (1850), vol. 1 of 4.
    http://archive.org/details/commentaryonboo01calv
    Calvin, Commentary on the Book of the Prophet Isaiah (1850), vol. 2 of 4.
    http://archive.org/details/9thcommentaryonbo02calv
    Calvin, Commentary on the Book of the Prophet Isaiah (1850), vol. 3 of 4.
    http://archive.org/details/commentaryonbook03calv
    Calvin, Commentary on the Book of the Prophet Isaiah (1850), vol. 4 of 4.
    http://archive.org/details/commentaryonboo04calv
    Commentary on Isaiah -- Volume 1, John Calvin
    http://www.ccel.org/ccel/calvin/calcom13.html

    *Clarkson, Andrew, Plain Reasons for Presbyterians Dissenting From the Revolution-Church in Scotland: As Also, Their Principles Concerning Civil Government, and the difference betwixt the reformation and revolution principles. Published for confirming the weak, and informing of the misinformed in those matters. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #6, #24, #26.
    "An exceedingly rare and important book now back in print after 265 years! The Contending Witness magazine (May, 1841), described PLAIN REASONS as 'the single best volume penned defending the principles of the Second Reformation.' It sets forth 'the grounds why Presbyterian Dissenters refused to hold communion with the revolution church and state.' (Reformed Presbytery, Act Declaration and Testimony for the Whole of Our Covenanted Reformation, p. 154). These principles still apply today and this still remains one of the best books explaining why and when an individual (our church), should separate itself from those (in church or state), who do not hold fast to all the attainments of our covenanted forefathers." -- Publisher
    Clarkson, Andrew, Plain Reasons for Presbyterians Dissenting from the Revolution Church of Scotland. Also, Their Principles Concerning Civil Government, and the Difference Betwixt the Reformation and Revolution Principles, 1731.
    http://www.swrb.com/newslett/actualnls/PlainTOC.htm
    Plain Reasons for Presbyterians Dissenting From the Revolution Church of Scotland (A Short Article Holding Forth the Principles of the Book by the Same Name) excerpted from The Contending Witness, Vol. I., No. 1, April, 1841.
    http://www.truecovenanter.com/reformedpresbyterian/magazine/contending_witness_plain_reasons_of_dissent.html

    *Cunningham, John (1819-1893), The Ordinance of Covenanting, 1843. A Christian classic. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #3, #27.
    "This book is considered by many as the classic work on covenanting. 'The theology of Covenanting is here unfolded with a richness of scriptural research and a maturity of intellectual strength which would have made the grey eye of Peden glisten with delight. The treatise is a valuable addition to that solid theological literature of which the Reformed Presbyterian Church has produced repeated and enduring specimens, and stamps Mr. Cunningham as a distinguished disciple of the thoughtful and scriptural school of Mason and the Symingtons.' (Presbyterian Review [1844] as cited by Johnston, Treasury of the Scottish Covenant)
    "The author himself notes that 'prayer and the offering of praise are universally admitted to be duties of religion. The Scriptures announce a place among these for the exercise of solemn Covenanting . . . What the word of God unfolds concerning it, is addressed to the most resolute consideration of all, and is capable of engaging the most extensive and prolonged investigation. And yet, though none have found this subject, like all God's judgements, else than a great deep, still in meditating upon it, the ignorant have been brought to true knowledge, and the wise have increased in wisdom. The secret of the Lord is with them that fear him; and he will shew them his covenant (Ps. 25:14 [Psalm 25:14]). Mutual federal engagements, concerning things religious and civil, whether entered into merely by simple promise, or confirmed by the solemn oath, have been made from the highest antiquity to the present. The hostility to some such engagements, and also the proud disregard for their obligation, which have been evinced by some in all ages, demand a most careful examination into their nature and design . . . Furnished with the key of Scripture, approaching the subject, we are enabled to open the mysteries in which ignorance and prejudice had shut it up; and equipped with the armour of light shooting forth its heavenly radiance, in safety to ourselves we assail the darkness thrown around it, and behold the instant flight of the spirits of error which that darkness contains. Standing alone in beauteous attractions descended from heaven upon it, this service beckons us to approach it, and engages to connect extensive good with a proper attention to its claims. The observance, under various phases, is described in Scripture as an undisputed and indisputable reality.'
    "In this book Cunningham exhaustively covers the subject of covenanting in over 400 pages. He deals with the manner, duty and nature of covenanting (including personal and social covenanting), the obligation covenanting confers, how covenanting is provided for in the everlasting covenant, how it is adapted to the moral constitution of man and how it is according to the purposes of God. Numerous Divine examples are cited from Scripture and covenanting is shown to be one of the great privileges of the Christian life.
    "An interesting chapter covers 'Covenanting Enforced By the Grant of Covenant Signs and Seals;' which touches on circumcision, baptism, the Sabbath, the Priesthood, the new heart and the person and work of the Lord Jesus Christ. Furthermore, this book demonstrates how God's approbation rested upon Covenanters in former ages, how covenanting is predicted in prophecy, how it is recommended by the practice of the New Testament Church and at what seasons it is appropriate. The appendices touch on the relationship of covenanting to immoral and unscriptural civil governments, the Free Presbyterian Church of Scotland, the British constitution and the apostasy of the Revolution settlement.
    "Additionally, Cunningham acknowledges that the true church is 'bound by the obligations of the Church of God is past times' and is still obligated to pay what it has vowed to the Lord in those magnificent attainments of the second Reformation (the epitome of these attainments being embodied in the Solemn League and Covenant and the Westminster Standards).
    "If you are interested in the ordinance of covenanting this is the most extensive treatment you will find in one book. It is a gold mine of Scriptural references and should be read at least once by everyone who calls upon the name of Christ." -- Publisher
    "David Steele dedicated this work [Notes on the Apocalypse -- compiler], to John Cunningham, author of THE ORDINANCE OF COVENANTING." -- Publisher
    The Ordinance of Covenanting
    http://www.covenanter.org/reformed/2015/6/29/ordinance-of-covenanting

    *De Graaf, Simon Gerrit, Promise and Deliverance, 4 volumes (Scarsdale, NY [Westminster Discount Book Service, P.O. Box 125H, Scarsdale 10583]: Westminster Discount Book Service, 1977) ISBN: 0888150024 9780888150028 0888150067 9780888150066 0888150083 9780888150080 0888150105 9780888150103 0887560547 9780887560545. Translated from the Dutch by H. Evan Runner and Elisabeth Wichers Runner. A Christian classic.
    "A landmark in interpreting the simple stories of the Bible . . . an invaluable resource for teachers, ministers, and parents." -- Christianity Today
    "In Scripture, religion means covenant. By His Word, God called into being an order of creation culminating in man. By that Word He also gave man His favor and brought him into a life of conscious covenantal fellowship with Himself. As De Graaf himself puts it: 'Without covenant, there is no religion, no conscious fellowship between man and God, no exchange of love and faithfulness. Without the covenant, man would be just an instrument in God's hand. When God created man, He had more than an instrument in mind: He made a creature that could respond to Him. . . .'
    "This renewed insight into Biblical revelation is the perspective undergirding De Graaf's treatment of all Bible stories. It makes his book a unique presentation of God's revelation of Himself in the covenant and keeps his interpretations of the stories from degenerating into mere moralizing. Religion is not morality." -- H. Evan Runner
    "I highly recommend this book. One of the best books available." -- R.C. Sproul

    Dodds, James (1813-1874), The Fifty Years' Struggle of the Scottish Covenanters 1638-1688, fifth edition. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
    " 'This volume does not pretend to be an exhaustive History of the Period selected, or properly a History at all. It is only a series of descriptive Sketches, meant to represent in outline the successive phases of the Covenanting Struggle. The subject is a noble one for a History, having an epic completeness -- a beginning, middle, and end -- with it clearly-defined half century . . . The main body of the Narrative has been based on a careful collation of the best authorities -- those contemporary or nearly contemporary with the events . . . I have also had the privilege . . . of examining the documents of the period in the State Paper Office," notes the author. Indexed." -- Publisher
    Dodds, James (1813-1874), The Fifty Years' Struggle of the Scottish Covenanters, 1638-88 (1860)
    http://archive.org/details/fiftyyearsstrugg00dodd

    *Gillespie, George (1613-1648), Aaron's Rod Blossoming; or, the Divine Ordinance of Church Government Vindicated, 1646. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available in THE PRESBYTERIAN'S ARMOURY.
    "The remainder of the title reads: 'So as the Present Erastian Controversy Concerning the Distinction of Civil and Ecclesiastical Government, Excommunication and Suspension, is Fully Debated and Discussed, from the Holy Scriptures, for the Jewish and Christian Antiquities, from the Consent of Later Writers, from the True Nature and Rights of Magistracy, and from the Groundlessness of the Chief Objections made Against the Presbyterial Government, in Point of a Domineering Arbitrary Unlimited Power'."
    "In short, this book deals with the biblical view of the separation of church and state, and is especially pertinent concerning the modern political climate, in which the old Erastian tree of civil ecclesiastical interference is growing strong and spreading much poisonous fruit. As with just about everything else Gillespie wrote, this book has been widely recognized as THE classic in its field. Three major sections cover 'Of the Jewish Church Government;' 'Of Christian Church Government;' and 'Of Excommunication from the Church, and of Suspension from the Lord's Table.' Lachman, in his Preface writes, 'It presents the classic Reformed point of view, one now little heard and perhaps less understood. Gillespie writes carefully and clearly, in many respects resembling the better know John Owen in the clarity and power of his reasoning.' Bannerman states, 'This famous treatise is unquestionably the most able, learned, systematic, and complete work on the Erastian controversy in existence. It deserves, and will repay, the most careful study.' (The Church of Christ, vol. 2, p. 432). Beattie, (Memorial Volume, p. xxxvi, 1879), called this book, 'the ablest plea for Presbytery ever made'." -- Publisher
    Gillespie, George (1613-1648), Aaron's Rod Blossoming, or, The Divine Ordinance of Church Government Vindicated (1844)
    http://archive.org/details/aaronsrodblosso00gillgoog
    Aaron's rod blossoming, or, The divine ordinance of Church-government vindicated, (full view), George Gillespie
    http://books.google.com/books?id=ivUDAAAAQAAJ&ie=ISO-8859-1&output=html

    *Gillespie, George (1613-1648), Ezekiel's Vision of Millennial Glory, Preparation for Coming Reformation and a Remedy for Backsliding and Lukewarmness. Available (THE PURITAN FAST SERMONS, 1640-1652, THE WORKS OF GEORGE GILLESPIE, and as two MP3 files), on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available (two MP3 files), on Reformation Bookshelf CD #18.
    "This sermon was originally preached to England's House of Commons 'At Their Late Solemn Fast, Wednesday, March 27, 1644.' It is taken from volume one of Gillespie's two volume WORKS. It gives great insight into the covenanted unity, uniformity and worldwide Reformation sought by the majority of the Westminster Divines and the best of the civil leaders of Gillespie's day. Gillespie searchingly deals with the individual, the church and the state, while painting a Scriptural picture of prophesied earthly victory (Isa. 2:2-5 [Isaiah 2:2-5], Ezek. 47:1-12 [Ezekiel 47:1-12], etc.) -- in classic historicist postmillennial style -- which is sure to stir even the coldest Christian heart. He shows how the worst disease the land can suffer is corruption in religion (particularly as exhibited in false worship), rebukes those opposing the Solemn League and Covenant and calls upon all to maintain (and even improve upon), the Reformation attainments whereunto we have already attained. (Phil. 3:16 [Philippians 3:16]). It is also interesting to note, especially since this sermon was preached before civil rulers, that though Gillespie points out the need for humility, repentance, prayer, tears, godly affections, sanctified minds and honorable actions, he does not forget to mention the importance of a covenanted army in this great cause of Christ's Covenanted Reformation. Also noted is the destruction of Antichrist, the calling and conversion of the Jews (Rom. 11 [Romans 11]), the two witnesses and the 1260 year apostasy. Gillespie closes with an appeal to the English House of Commons, with whom the Scots had 'joined in covenant and in arms,' to be faithful 'according to the word he (God -- RB), hath covenanted with you (i.e. in the Solemn League and Covenant -- RB), so his spirit remaineth among you' -- exhorting these magistrates to fear not but to be strong in the Lord, and in the power of his might. This is classic Covenanter preaching, among the best sermons you may ever hear!" -- Publisher

    *Gillespie, Patrick (1617-1675), The Ark of the Covenant Opened; or, A Treatise of the Covenant of Redemption Between God and Christ, as the Foundation of the Covenant of Grace, 1677. A Christian classic. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #27.
    "John Owen, in his preface to this treatise writes, 'I do freely declare my judgement that for order, method, perspicuity in treating, and solidity of argument, the ensuing discourse exceedeth whatsoever single treatise I have seen written with the same design.' (cited in Johnston, Treasury of the Scottish Covenant, p. 337). David Lachman tells us that 'in addition to arranging his brother's papers (published as Miscellany Questions [now found in George Gillespie's two volume Works, -- RB]), Gillespie used his materials also for the beginning of the first of a five-volume work on the covenant. Only two were published: THE ARK OF THE TESTAMENT OPENED . . . (1661) and THE ARK OF THE COVENANT OPENED . . . (1677), respectively treating the nature and kinds of covenants and the Mediator of the covenant. The third, on the condition of the covenant and the instrumentality of faith in justification, was extant in 1707, when the remaining two, respectively on the privileges and duties of the covenant, were believed lost (Analecta, I, 168-9) . . . Gillespie (was a -- RB), Covenanter, Principal of Glasgow University, and leading Protester.' (Nigel Cameron, editor, Dictionary of Scottish Church History and Theology, p. 382). In this volume Gillespie proves:

    1. That there is such a Covenant (of Redemption).
    2. The necessity of it.
    3. The nature, properties, and parties thereof.
    4. The tenor, articles, subject matter of Redemption.
    5. The commands, conditions, and promises annexed.
    6. The harmony of the Covenant of suretyship made with Christ, and the Covenant of reconciliation made with sinners: wherein they agree, wherein they differ.
    7. Grounds of comfort from the Covenant of suretiship; and, of course, much, much more!
    "Owen, in his preface (who also notes his long friendship with Gillespie), further underscores the importance of this work when he writes, 'For the Doctrine hereof, or the truth herein, is the very Center wherein all the lines concerning the Grace of God and our own duty, do meet; wherein the whole of Religion doth consist. Hence unto the understanding, Notions, and Conception, that men have of these Covenants with God, and according as the Doctrines of them is stated in their minds, their Conceptions of all other sacred Truths, or Doctrines, are conformed'." -- Publisher
    Ark of the Covenant Opened: Chapter 3
    http://www.truecovenanter.com/supralapsarian/pgilles_aoc_cap03.html

    Hay Fleming, David (1849-1931), The Story of the Scottish Covenants in Outline. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
    "A great short (96 pages of larger print), easy reading introduction to the covenants and the Covenanters. Tells the story of many of the Scottish religious bonds and the people and places that surrounded them. A good introductory study for home-schoolers or those that do not have time for the larger volumes covering this topic." -- Publisher
    http://archive.org/details/storyofscottishc00flemiala

    *Hewison, James King, The Covenanters: A History of the Church in Scotland From the Reformation to the Revolution, 1908, 2 volumes (1908). Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #25.
    "Smellie, in his preface to MEN OF THE COVENANT, calls this set a 'great treatise on the Covenanters -- a treatise which covers the entire field and seems to leave no word unsaid.' Hewison states that he desired to produce 'an absolutely impartial account of the Covenanters.' He also notes that 'certain definite conclusions regarding the Covenanters, as a rigid sect in the Christian Church, and as a restless, rebellious political party in the 16th and 17th centuries, have been arrived at by many students; and, as a general rule, a far from favourable estimate of these brave and defensible patriots has been based upon generalizations which will not bear investigation.' Moreover, he recognizes the Covenanters for who they were: 'one of the most extraordinary orders of devotees which the civilized world ever saw.' The work is enhanced by photographic reproductions of portraits, pictures, and Covenants. Considered by some as the definitive work on the Covenanters (over 1100 pages). If you are going to study church history after the Apostles, no other group or time period offers as much edifying material. This set is sure to put a fiery zeal in the soul of all those who love the Lord Jesus Christ. Great price too!" -- Publisher
    Hewison, The Covenanters: A History of the Church in Scotland From the Reformation to the Revolution, vol. 1 of 2.
    http://archive.org/details/covenantershisto01hewi
    Hewison, The Covenanters: A History of the Church in Scotland From the Reformation to the Revolution, vol. 2 of 2.
    http://archive.org/details/covenantershisto02hewi

    *Knox, John (1505-1572), The History of the Reformation in Scotland, ISBN: 0851513581. A Christian classic. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available in WORKS OF JOHN KNOX on Reformation Bookshelf CD #1. Alternate title: UNEDITED HISTORY OF THE REFORMATION IN SCOTLAND. Available in THE WORKS OF JOHN KNOX, Vol. 1 of 6, (Book 1-2).
    "It breaths with the spirit of excitement and expectation, being told by the author from his experience as an eyewitness and participant in the unfolding drama of the work of God in 16th century Scotland." -- Jay P. Green, Sr.
    "Knox portrayed the origins and development of a movement and not a mere chronology of events . . . Knox based his arguments on original sources and he often cited the documents in full. When KNOX'S HISTORY is compared to the contemporary vernacular narratives of Bishop Leslie and Sir James Melville, the superiority of Knox's work becomes evident. For the most part, these writers were preoccupied with petty details and had no conception of the momentous issues that hung on the events they recorded . . . Knox used history to demonstrate his single-track philosophy. And his philosophy said: 'The hearts of men, their thoughts, and their actions are but in the hands of God.' Lee said KNOX'S HISTORY was a sermon without an audience, a preaching book, one long inflammatory speech in behalf of God's truth as the reformer saw it.' (Kyle, The Mind of John Knox, p. 13). Our editions of volumes one and two of KNOX'S WORKS contain the only full, unedited version of Knox's massive HISTORY OF THE REFORMATION IN SCOTLAND available today." -- Publisher

    *Knox, John (1505-1572), The History of the Reformation of Religion Within the Realm of Scotland. . . . Together with the life of the author, and several curious pieces wrote by him, . . . By the Reverend Mr. John Knox, . . . To which is added, I. An admonition to England and Scotland . . . by Antoni Gilby. II. The first and second books of discipline, Glasgow, 1761. Alternate title: THE HISTORIE OF THE REFORMATION OF THE CHURCH OF SCOTLAND CONTAINING FIVE BOOKS: TOGETHER WITH SOME TREATISES CONDUCING TO THE HISTORY. EDITED, WITH A LIFE OF KNOX AND A PREFACE, BY DAVID BUCHANAN. INCLUDES: "THE APPELLATION OF JOHN KNOX, FROM THE . . . SENTENCE PRONOUNCED AGAINST HIM (pp. 1-33); "THE ADMONITION OF JOHN KNOX TO HIS BELOVED BRETHREN THE COMMONALTY OF SCOTLAND" (pp. 34-42); "A FAITHFULL ADMONITION MADE BY JOHN KNOX TO THE TRUE PROFESSORS OF THE GOSPEL OF CHRIST WITHIN THE KINGDOM OF ENGLAND, 1554" (pp. 43-79); "THE COPIE OF A LETTER DELIVERED TO QUEEN MARY, REGENT OF SCOTLAND" (pp. 80-97); AND "A SERMON PREACHED BY JOHN KNOX [AUGUST 19, 1565]," ISBN: 0851513581 9780851513584. Available (WORKS OF JOHN KNOX), on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available (WORKS OF JOHN KNOX), on Reformation Bookshelf CD #1. A Christian classic.
    "Containing, The Manner, and by what Persons, the Light of Christ's Gospel has been manifested unto this Realm, after that horrible and universal Defection from the Truth, which has come by the Means of that Roman Antichrist. Together with the life of the author, and several curious pieces wrote by him, viz. I. His Appellation from the cruel and most unjust Sentence pronounced against him, by the false Bishops and Clergy of Scotland; with his Supplication and Exhortation to the Nobility, States, and Commonality of the same Realm. II. His faithful Admonition to the true Professors of the Gospel of Christ within the Kingdom of England. III. His Letter to Queen Mary, Regent of Scotland. IV. His Exhortation to England for the speedy Embracing of Christ's Gospel. V. The first Blast of the Trumpet against the Monstrous Regiment of Women. VI. A Sermon on Isaiah xxvi. 13 [Isaiah 26:13], &c. By the Reverend Mr. John Knox, some time Minister of God's Word in Edinburgh. To which is added, I. An admonition to England and Scotland to call them to Repentance, written by Antoni Gilby. II. The first and second books of discipline; together with some Acts of the General Assemblies clearing and confirming the same; And an Act of Parliament. With a large Index to the whole." -- Contents
    "It breaths with the spirit of excitement and expectation, being told by the author from his experience as an eyewitness and participant in the unfolding drama of the work of God in 16th century Scotland." -- Jay P. Green, Sr.
    "Knox portrayed the origins and development of a movement and not a mere chronology of events . . . Knox based his arguments on original sources and he often cited the documents in full. When Knox's History is compared to the contemporary vernacular narratives of Bishop Leslie and Sir James Melville, the superiority of Knox's work becomes evident. For the most part, these writers were preoccupied with petty details and had no conception of the momentous issues that hung on the events they recorded . . . Knox used history to demonstrate his single-track philosophy. And his philosophy said: 'The hearts of men, their thoughts, and their actions are but in the hands of God.' Lee said Knox's History was a sermon without an audience, a preaching book, one long inflammatory speech in behalf of God's truth as the reformer saw it.' (Kyle, The Mind of John Knox, p. 13). Our editions of volumes one and two of Knox's Works contain the only full, unedited version of Knox's massive History of the Reformation in Scotland available today." -- Publisher

    *Knox, John (1505-1572), The History of the Reformation in Scotland, ISBN: 0851513581. A Christian classic. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available in WORKS OF JOHN KNOX on Reformation Bookshelf CD #1. Alternate title: UNEDITED HISTORY OF THE REFORMATION IN SCOTLAND. Available in THE WORKS OF JOHN KNOX, Vol. 1 of 6, (Book 1-2).
    "It breaths with the spirit of excitement and expectation, being told by the author from his experience as an eyewitness and participant in the unfolding drama of the work of God in 16th century Scotland." -- Jay P. Green, Sr.
    "Knox portrayed the origins and development of a movement and not a mere chronology of events . . . Knox based his arguments on original sources and he often cited the documents in full. When KNOX'S HISTORY is compared to the contemporary vernacular narratives of Bishop Leslie and Sir James Melville, the superiority of Knox's work becomes evident. For the most part, these writers were preoccupied with petty details and had no conception of the momentous issues that hung on the events they recorded . . . Knox used history to demonstrate his single-track philosophy. And his philosophy said: 'The hearts of men, their thoughts, and their actions are but in the hands of God.' Lee said KNOX'S HISTORY was a sermon without an audience, a preaching book, one long inflammatory speech in behalf of God's truth as the reformer saw it.' (Kyle, The Mind of John Knox, p. 13). Our editions of volumes one and two of KNOX'S WORKS contain the only full, unedited version of Knox's massive HISTORY OF THE REFORMATION IN SCOTLAND available today." -- Publisher

    Knox, John (1505-1572), John Knox Debates Theonomy, Idolatry and Civil Resistance in the General Assembly of 1564. Available (singly or in WORKS OF JOHN KNOX on the Puritan Hard Drive. The full printed version of this text is free online. "Excerpted from Knox's THE HISTORY OF THE REFORMATION IN SCOTLAND, BOOK IV. From THE WORKS OF JOHN KNOX, VOLUME 2, pages 425-461, collected and edited by David Laing, 1854."
    " 'Perhaps the most thoroughgoing Calvinist,' writes W. Stanford Reid in (Christian History, Vol. 5, No. 4), 'who took the teacher's (Calvin -- RB), ideas to their logical conclusions, was the Scot, John Knox.' This debate is a perfect example of Knox's consistent Calvinism. In fact one wonders about a person's claim to consistent Calvinism at all if he denies the sovereignty of God in the civil arena (i.e. by denying the applicability of the first table of the law, especially the first two commandments, to the realm of the civil magistrate -- along with their penal sanctions as displayed in the Judicial laws of the Old Testament). Knox certainly did not shrink back from the binding nature of the law on these points. He even openly proclaimed, in this debate, that the death penalty should be carried out against idolaters -- and this was in the context of debating the Queen's Mass and her favoring the idolatry of Romanism. With boldness like this, it is easy to see why it was said over Knox's open grave, 'here lies a man who neither flattered nor feared any flesh.' This debate shows conclusively that Knox was a theonomist, in the sense that he believed in the continuing binding validity of OT penal sanctions. Moreover it demonstrates that it is the duty of all ministers to preach that the civil magistrate is bound to uphold the law of God and promote and protect only the one true Reformed religion. Furthermore Knox argued, from the OT, that to tolerate public idolatry is to disobey God and bring a curse upon the land. Though Knox's REFORMATION, REVOLUTION AND ROMANISM is his most important political writing, this debate displays the very same principles, as Knox applied them in 'the heat of battle,' against the queen's secretary, William Maitland of Lethington. This particular debate, as well as many other large sections, are edited out of THE HISTORY OF THE REFORMATION IN SCOTLAND as presently reprinted by The Banner of Truth Trust. However, this debate can also be found in the bound photocopy edition of volume 2 of KNOX'S WORKS or, with contemporary spelling and punctuation, in ON REBELLION (Cambridge Univ. Press, 1994, see page XX in this catalogue). Reid (Trumpeter of God, pp. 234-235), notes that 'the implications of this debate were far reaching' and that 'as far as Knox personally was concerned, this debate also marked a turning point in his career.' Also of great importance was the situation that occurred 'when Maitland quoted Luther, Musculus, Calvin, and others to support the requirement of absolute obedience, Knox replied that they either spoke in a situation in which they had no power to resist the ruler or they were refuting arguments of Anabaptists who rejected all civil government. Unfaithful rulers could therefore be removed by the people if they had the power to do so. In this position he was supported by John Craig, his colleague in St. Giles, and by most, although not all, of the other ministers.' (Reid, Trumpeter of God, p. 234). As present civil governments continue to promote defiance of the laws of 'the Prince of the kings of the Earth,' our great King the Lord Jesus Christ, these arguments will become more and more useful, among those who seek to obey the Lord in all matters." -- Publisher
    Reformation, Revolution and Romanism (1558), John Knox
    "This has been called John Knox's most important political writing. It also deals with Romanism, God's law and much more. "
    http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?currSection=sermonssource&sermonID=1030075041

    *Lusk, Robert (1781-1845), Characteristics of the Witnessing Church. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #23.
    Reprinted from The Original Covenanter and Contending Witness, various issues, published by the Reformed Presbytery of North America.
    Lusk, Robert, Characteristics of the Witnessing Church
    http://www.covenanter.org/reformed/2016/6/20/d2t1s9uxbnxaispskag80dis1k9keh

    *Mason, Archibald, Observations on the Public Covenants Betwixt God and the Church: A Discourse (1799). Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #27.
    Contents: Observations on the public covenants betwixt God and the church / Archibald Mason -- Paleopresbyterianism vs. neopresbyterianism / Michael Wagner -- Permanence of covenant obligation -- The preface and bibliography to the rare bound photocopy: obligation of social covenanting -- The binding nature of national covenants with God -- The Solemn League and Covenant -- Guide for studying the Westminster Confession, in suggested order of reading -- Terms of ministerial and Christian communion in the Reformed Presbyterian Church -- Corporate sanctification: holding fast the attainments of Reformation / John Brown -- What is a moral person? How God views the church and the nations / David Scott, John Cunningham, and George Smeaton -- A hind let loose / Alexander Shields -- Of separation from corrupt churches -- Old landmarks -- confession and testimony.
    Includes: What Is a Moral Person? How God Views the Church and the Nations, David Scott, John Cunningham, and George Smeaton
    http://www.swrb.com/newslett/actualnls/moral.htm

    *M'Crie, Thomas (1772-1835), Brief View of the Evidence for the Exercise of Civil Authority About Religion. Available in STATEMENT OF THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THE PROFESSION OF THE REFORMED CHURCH OF SCOTLAND, AS ADOPTED BY SECEDERS, AND THE PROFESSION CONTAINED IN THE NEW TESTIMONY AND OTHER ACTS, LATELY ADOPTED BY THE GENERAL ASSOCIATE SYNOD, Section VII. A Christian classic. Considered to be among the ten greatest books in the English language. Available (STATEMENT OF THE DIFFERENCE), on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available (STATEMENT OF THE DIFFERENCE), on Reformation Bookshelf CD #25.
    "M'Crie published at Edinburgh in 1807 a helpful discussion of the biblical evidence for an obligation of nations and their civil rulers to give recognition to the true religion. His book is a protest against the church in which he was ordained, and which subsequently departed from the principles it had espoused: STATEMENT OF THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THE PROFESSION OF THE REFORMED CHURCH OF SCOTLAND, AS ADOPTED BY SECEDERS, AND THE PROFESSION CONTAINED IN THE NEW TESTIMONY AND OTHER ACTS, LATELY ADOPTED BY THE GENERAL ASSOCIATE SYNOD. It has often been regarded as the best presentation of the confessional point of view respecting a national acknowledgment of religion. Churches formed after M'Crie's death found their conflicts over church principles defined in his literary output." -- Publisher
    Brief View of the Evidence for the Exercise of Civil Authority About Religion
    http://www.westminsterconfession.org/a-godly-society/the-exercise-of-civil-authority-about-religion.php

    *M'Crie, Thomas (1772-1835), Statement of the Difference . . . Particularly on the Power of Civil Magistrates Respecting Religion, National Reformation, National Churches, and National Covenants, 1871. Alternate title: STATEMENT OF THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THE PROFESSION OF THE REFORMED CHURCH OF SCOTLAND, AS ADOPTED BY SECEDERS, AND THE PROFESSION CONTAINED IN THE NEW TESTIMONY AND OTHER ACTS LATELY ADOPTED BY THE GENERAL ASSOCIATE SYNOD. A Christian classic. Considered to be among the ten greatest books in the English language. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #25.
    " 'The ablest exposition in the English language of the Establishment Principle . . . Dr. (George) Smeaton describes the Statement as a masterly defense of the principles of establishments as Scripture truth: and the most complete vindication ever given to the world of the position occupied by the Reformed Church of Scotland, on the whole subject of national religion and the magistrates legitimate power in promoting it. 'The same thoroughness,' wrote the late Rev. D. Beaton, 'which gave such abiding value to his great biography of Knox, is shown in this, his less known work . . . Dr. McCrie in his STATEMENT shows that all the Confessions of the Protestant and Presbyterian Churches of the Reformation, both in Britain and on the Continent of Europe, held and maintained the Establishment Principle. 'These harmoniously agree,' he writes, 'in declaring as with one mouth that civil authority is not limited to the secular affairs of men, and that the public care and advancement of religion is a principle part of the official duty of magistrates.' He goes on to give extracts from THE CONFESSION OF HELVETIA; THE CONFESSION OF BOHEMIA; THE CONFESSION OF SAXONY; THE FRENCH CONFESSION; THE BELGIC OR DUTCH CONFESSION; THE CONFESSION OF THE ENGLISH CONGREGATION IN GENEVA; THE SCOTS CONFESSION AND THE WESTMINSTER CONFESSION OF FAITH (1646). 'Such is the harmony of doctrine in the Protestant churches on this head,' he remarks, 'expressed in their confessions and public formularies drawn from the Word of God; a harmony which deserves great attention, and from which none should rashly depart' (as cited in CHRIST'S KINGSHIP OVER THE NATIONS by C.J. Brown). Concerning the doctrine of national obedience to Christ, M'Crie demonstrates in the most convincing way that there are few doctrines 'of the practical kind, in which the best interests of mankind and the general state of religion in the world, are more deeply concerned, than in the right and wrong determination of this question.' Contains an excellent preface by George Smeaton. Considered one of the definitive works on Church/State relations, defending the historic Reformed position. An extremely rare and very expensive item if located as a rare book." -- Publisher
    Brief View of the Evidence for the Exercise of Civil Authority About Religion
    http://www.westminsterconfession.org/a-godly-society/the-exercise-of-civil-authority-about-religion.php

    *McFeeters, J.C., Sketches of the Covenanters. A Christian classic. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #1.
    "Stirring accounts of sacrifice and martyrdom for the Reformed Faith that will bring tears to eyes of all but the backslidden. Follows the chain of events which gave Scotland two Reformations and a Revolution. Knox, the National Covenant, the Westminster Assembly, the Field Meetings, and much more is covered. The history of great battles for Christ and His royal rights are recounted in this moving history book. Sheds much light upon the warfare with the dragon for true liberty. One of our best history books, highly recommended!" -- Publisher
    Sketches of the Covenanters
    http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/13570

    Mitchell, Alexander F. (1822-1899), Westminster Assembly: Its History and Standards. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
    "The first three lectures give a succinct account of English Puritanism from its origin to the meeting of the Westminster Assembly. The tenth lecture is a similar account of the history of doctrine in British churches during the same period. Mitchell endeavors to give prominence to aspects of this historical period which have hiterto been overlooked, making this an ideal companion volume for other recent releases of Warfield, Hetherington, and George Gillespie. A perfect introductory volume on Puritanism and the work of the Assembly." -- GCB

    *Price, Greg L., Covenant Theology and its Implications. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #27 and #28.
    "An easy-to-understand introduction to the basics of Covenant Theology. Explains what Covenant Theology is, while adducing a number of practical and theological implications which must follow when this view of Scripture is adopted. Shows how Covenant Theology is (and was), foundational to all true Reformation. Refutes Dispensationalism. Includes overviews (with Scripture proofs), of the covenant of Redemption, the covenant of Works and the covenant of Grace. In short, Price proclaims the classic Reformed position on covenants (and the implications of covenant theology), as it has been declared in the best Reformed Confessions (e.g. The Westminster Confession of Faith [1646]), and in books like THE MARROW OF MODERN DIVINITY (by Fisher and Boston), THE COVENANT OF LIFE OPENED (by Samuel Rutherford), THE ARK OF THE COVENANT OPENED and THE ARK OF THE TESTAMENT OPENED by Patrick Gillespie and THE LIFE OF JUSTIFICATION OPENED (by John Brown of Wamphray). This is the best single tape sermon on Covenant Theology that we have knowledge of." -- Publisher
    Covenant Theology and its Implications a sermon by Greg Price
    http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?SID=22801202653

    *Price, Greg L., Foundation for Reformation: The Regulative Principle of Worship, 22 pages. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #1.
    Foundation for Reformation: The Regulative Principle of Worship. Greg Price
    http://www.swrb.com/newslett/actualNLs/reformation-rpw-gp.htm

    *Purves, Jock, Fair Sunshine: Character Studies of the Scottish Covenanters (The Banner of Truth Trust, 1968), 206 pages, ISBN: 0851511368 9780851511368. Publishing history: The material in this volume consists of two works: SWEET BELIEVING, 1948, and FAIR SUNSHINE: FURTHER STUDIES OF THE SCOTTISH COVENANTERS (91 pages), 1957.
    "I first read this book several years ago at the recommendation of my late father, who was a sovereign grace Baptist minister. . . .
    "I would highly recommend this book to anyone. And anyone who reads this book will be truly blessed. If it were possible the book should have more than five stars." -- Reader's Comment
    An Outline of Scottish 'Covenant History' in the 17th Century From Purves' Book FAIR SUNSHINE
    http://www.ianpaisley.org/article.asp?cov_intro.htm

    *Reformed Presbytery in North America (Steelite), David Steele (1803-1887), John Thorburn (1730?-1788), John Courtass (d. 1795), et al., Act, Declaration, and Testimony, for the Whole of the Covenanted Reformation, as Attained to, and Established in, Britain and Ireland; Particularly Betwixt the Years 1638 and 1649, Inclusive. As, Also, Against all the Steps of Defection From Said Reformation, Whether in Former or Later Times, Since the Overthrow of that Glorious Work, Down to This Present day (1876), (Philadelphia, PA: Printed by Rue and Jones, 1876), a new edition of the Ploughlandhead Testimony of 1761, the subordinate standard of the original "Steelite" Reformed Presbytery that was constitutes in 1840. Available (the 1850 edition only) on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available (the 1850 edition only) on Reformation Bookshelf CD #1.
    "And now, when time has proved that more recent Testimonies, Terms, and Covenants, have failed to preserve either unity or uniformity among those who framed them; it cannot be unseasonable to re-exhibit the original ACT, DECLARATION, AND TESTIMONY, which has been justly characterized as 'the most profoundly reasoned document ever emitted by the Reformed Presbyterian Church'." -- The Reformation Advocate Magazine, Vol. I, No. 8, December, 1875, page 267
    "Upholds the original work of the Westminster Assembly and testifies to the abiding worth and truth formulated in the Westminster family of documents. Upholds and defends the Crown Rights of King Jesus in Church and State, denouncing those who would remove the crown from Christ's head by denying His right to rule (by His law), in both the civil and ecclesiastical spheres. Testifies to the received doctrine, government, worship, and discipline of the Church of Scotland in her purest (reforming) periods. Applies God's Word to the Church's corporate attainments 'with a judicial approbation of the earnest contendings and attainments of the faithful, and a strong and pointed judicial condemnation of error and the promoters thereof.' (The Contending Witness magazine, Dec. 17/93, p. 558). Shows the church's great historical victories (such as the National and Solemn League and Covenant, leading to the Westminster Assembly), and exposes her enemies actions (e.g. the Prelacy of Laud; the Independency, sectarianism, covenant breaking and ungodly toleration set forth by the likes of Cromwell [and the Independents that conspired with him]; the Erastianism and civil sectarianism of William of Orange, etc.). It is not likely that you will find a more consistent working out of the principles of Calvinism anywhere. Deals with the most important matters relating to the individual, the family, the church and the state. Sets forth a faithful historical testimony of God's dealings with men during some of the most important days of church history. A basic text that should be mastered by all Christians." -- Publisher
    Act, Declaration, and Testimony (1876)
    https://archive.org/details/actdeclarationte00refo
    Act, Declaration and Testimony, 1761 (edition of 1876.)
    "Compared with the 1777 edition, Philadelphia. We hereby certify that this is a true edition of the ORIGINAL JUDICIAL TESTIMONY, emitted by the Reformed Presbytery at Ploughlandhead, Scotland, 1761; together with the Supplements adopted by the Reformed Presbytery at this date, June 2d, 1876. [Signed -- compiler] David Steele, James Campbell, Robert Clyde, Robert Alexander, Committee.
    http://www.truecovenanter.com/

    *Reformed Presbytery in North America, "Steelite," (David Steele [1803-1887], James Campbell, Thomas Sproull, James Fulton), A Short Vindication of our Covenanted Reformation, 2nd Edition, Revised, and Enlarged by a Committee of the Reformed Presbytery ("Circular" and "Review" prefixed), 1879, 50 pages. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Also available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #2 (also #1, #25, and #30).
    "Until the church comes to terms with what is written in this book it will remain weak and divided. Covenant breakers will not prosper, as this rare item demonstrates from both Scripture and history. The power packed ordinance of covenanting (the National and Solemn League and Covenant in particular), was foundational to the second Reformation and the work of the Westminster Assembly. 'By the National Covenant our fathers laid Popery prostrate. By the Solemn League and Covenant they were successful in resisting prelatic encroachments and civil tyranny. By it they were enabled to achieve the Second Reformation . . . They were setting up landmarks by which the location and limits of the city of God will be known at the dawn of the millennial day . . . How can they be said to go forth by the footsteps of the flock, who have declined from the attainments, renounced the covenants and contradicted the testimony of 'the cloud of witnesses. . . . All the schisms (separations) that disfigure the body mystical of Christ . . . are the legitimate consequences of the abandonment of reformation attainments, the violation of covenant engagements.' If you are interested in knowing how to recognize a faithful church (or state), when and why to separate from unfaithful institutions, who has held up the standard of Covenanted Reformation attainments and who has backslidden (and why), what it means to subscribe to the Westminster Confession (1646), (and why most that say they do so today do not have any idea of what that means), and much more concerning individual, family, church and civil, individual, family, church and civil duties, this is one of the best books you will ever lay your hands on. It chronicles 'some instances of worldly conformity and mark(s) some steps of defection from our 'covenanted unity and uniformity,' noting how 'it is necessary to take a retrospect of our history for many years; for we did not all at once reach our present condition of sinful ignorance and manifold apostasy.' Presbyterian and the Reformed churches lay under the heavy hand of God's judgement in our day, because of the very defections noted throughout this fine work. 'We heard (hear) from various quarters the cry, "maintain the truth, stand up for the principles of the Second Reformation;" and yet many of those who are the most loud in uttering this cry, appear desirous to bury in oblivion those imperishable national and ecclesiastical deeds, by which the church and kingdom of Scotland became 'married to the Lord.' Are we married to the Lord, or have we thrown off the covenants of our forefathers; are we the chaste bride of Christ, or a harlot who is found in the bedchambers of every devilish suitor (whether ecclesiastical or civil), who tempts us with the favors of this world? Let us cry out, as with 'the noble Marquis of Argyle, upon the scaffold,' when he said, 'God hath tied us by covenants to religion and reformation. These that were then unborn are yet engaged, and it passeth the power of all the magistrates under heaven to absolve them from the oath of God. They deceive themselves, and it may be, would deceive others, who think otherwise.' Not for the weak of heart." -- Publisher
    A Short Vindication of our Covenanted Reformation, Reformed Presbytery
    http://www.covenanter.org/reformed/2015/8/24/a-short-vindication-of-our-covenanted-reformation

    *Reformed Presbyterian Church of Scotland, Andrew Symington (editor), Lectures on the Principles of the Second Reformation. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #18.
    "Contents: Second Reformation / Andrew Symington
    Headship of Christ Over His church / James Ferguson
    Evils, Constitutional and Practical of the Prelatic Establishment of the British Empire / Thomas Neilson
    The Revolution Settlement of the Church of Scotland / John Graham
    Patronage Opposed to the Independence of the Church and to the Scriptural Rights of Christian people / W.H. Goold
    Headship of Christ Over the Nations / Andrew Symington
    Nature and Obligation of Public Vows / William Symington
    The sin and Danger of Union Between the Church of Christ and the Immoral or Anti-Christian Civil Government / Stewart Bates."
    Lectures on the Principles of the Second Reformation
    http://www.covenanter.org/reformed/2015/8/18/the-reformed-presbyterian-churchs-of-scotland-lectures-on-the-principles-of-the-second-reformation

    Reformed Presbyterian Church in the United States of America (RPCNA), Reformation Principles Exhibited, 1806-07, 260 pages. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
    "Although this document was unfaithfully adopted by the RPCNA (when they decried faithful historical testimony as an article of faith in the preface), this book still contains much useful doctrinal and historical information. Part one is 'A Brief Historical View of the Church, As a Visible Society in Covenant with God. In Two Books. The First Exhibiting the Church Universal; and the Second the Reformed Presbyterian Church.'
    "Part two contains the 'Declaration and Testimony of the Reformed Presbyterian Church in America (RPCNA).'
    "Furthermore, notwithstanding the unfaithfulness of the adopting body, REFORMATION PRINCIPLES EXHIBITED testifies to real attainments. Examples include testifying against the immoral U.S. constitution, against jury duty, against the use of the elective franchise (voting) and against swearing an oath of allegiance under this immoral constitution. Close communion is upheld and occasional hearing is denounced as a sinful, schismatic practice. Interestingly, this earlier edition can be compared with later editions to exhibit the continuing defection of the RPCNA -- even from what was good (and part of her own terms of communion), in her own earlier standards. For example, in part two, chapter 21, point 5, 'Of Church Fellowship,' we read, 'We therefore condemn the following errors, and testify against all who maintain them: . . . 5. That it is lawful for the Church to be without any terms of communion. 6. That any person may be admitted to communion, who opposes any of the terms of Church fellowship. 7. That occasional communion may be extended to persons who should not be received to constant fellowship.' (p. 75). Also, 'We therefore condemn the following errors, and testify against all who maintain them . . . 1. That the Bible is the only proper testimony of the church (which takes into account that the Bible is the only divine testimony, but also recognizes human testimony, agreeable to Scripture, as binding [or else why preach, for example, if no one is bound to obey any human testimony, even if the human testimony is agreeable to the divine testimony found in the Bible? (Cf. Various places in Samuel Rutherford's DUE RIGHT OF PRESBYTERIES and A FREE DISPUTATION AGAINST PRETENDED LIBERTY OF CONSCIENCE for further explanation) -- RB]. 2. That a Christian is under no obligation to follow Christ's witnesses in their faithful contendings. 3. That it is lawful, in order to enlarge the church, to open a wider door of communion, by declining from a more pointed testimony, to one which is more loose and general.' (p. 120, part 2, emphases added). How sad that these faithful testimonies are no longer upheld (as points of discipline), in the modern RPCNA." -- Publisher
    "The introduction is particularly helpful in understanding Covenanter history in America.
    "A final caveat must likewise be observed, and it is this: that, while (1) the History related herein forms so much of the ground for presenting the document below, and while (2) as Covenanters we defend the use of Historical Testimony as a Term of Communion, and find the Historical Testimony of the ACT, DECLARATION, AND TESTIMONY competent to this end, yet -- We do not pretend that the History contained in REFORMATION PRINCIPLES EXHIBITED, either the first edition, or any later edition, is approvable for this purpose. Besides matters related which are not to be approved, the fact is, that the historical part of this work contains a number of inaccuracies and uncertain speculations that make it many ways inferior in nature to the ACT, DECLARATION, AND TESTIMONY. In the original testimony from Scotland, no attempt is made to account for the entire history of the Church of Jesus Christ, nor even to present full details concerning the history of the Church of Scotland. Instead, the authors set in order necessary and important historical facts that were well attested, and creditably related, and testified as to their morality or immorality. REFORMATION PRINCIPLES EXHIBITED, on the other hand, presents a Narrative of History, more and less certain, useful for the reader's instruction in ecclesiastical history, but not competent to form a Historical Testimony." -- True Covenanter
    Reformation Principles Exhibited
    http://truecovenanter.com/reformedpresbyterian/rpe.html

    *Renwick, James (1662-1688), Alexander Shields, and Other "Society People," An Informatory Vindication of a Poor, Wasted, Misrepresented Remnant of the Suffering, Anti-prelatic, Anti-Erastian . . . 1744. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #27.
    "INFORMATORY VINDICATION (1687), a statement of principles issued by the Society People (see Societies, United), during James VII's reign. Prepared mainly by James Renwick, latterly in consultation with Alexander Shields, it was published in Utrecht. Its full title reflects something of the contents: AN INFORMATORY VINDICATION OF A POOR WASTED MISREPRESENTED REMNANT OF THE SUFFERING ANTI-POPISH ANTI-PRELATIC ANTI-ERASTIAN ANTI-SECTARIAN TRUE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH OF CHRIST IN SCOTLAND UNITED TOGETHER IN A GENERAL CORRESPONDENCE. BY WAY OF REPLY TO VARIOUS ACCUSATIONS IN LETTERS INFORMATIONS AND CONFERENCES GIVEN FORTH AGAINST THEM. It refuted charges brought against the 'Remnant' of schism (in their eyes a great evil) . . . The VINDICATION mourned the estrangement from other Presbyterians who had accepted the government's INDULGENCES OR EDICTS OF TOLERATION, and expressed love for them as fellow-ministers 'with whom again we would desire to have communion in ordinances'. The separation had been forced upon the Society People by the tyranny and temper of the times, but it did not affect their position as being in the succession of the historic Kirk of Scotland. The document aimed to clear away the hostility and misunderstanding about them that had grown up in Scotland and Holland." (Nigel Cameron, editor, Dictionary of Scottish Church History and Theology, p. 429)
    "In proof of the catholic, unsectarian, Christian spirit of Renwick and his followers, the clear statements of the INFORMATORY VINDICATION, the work which most fully and clearly defines their position, may be referred to . . . In these noble utterances, we have strikingly exemplified the true spirit of Christian brotherhood . . . This is the genuine import of the vow of the Solemn League and Covenant, which binds Covenanters to regard whatever is done to the least of them, as done to all and to every one in particular. While firmly holding fast all Scriptural attainments, and contending earnestly for the faith once delivered to the saints, we should cordially rejoice in the evidences of grace in Christ's servants wherever we find them. We should love them as brethren, fulfil the law of Christ by bearing their burdens, wish them God speed in all that they are doing for the advancement of His glory, and fervently labour and pray for the coming of the happy period when divisions and animosities shall cease, and when there shall be one King, and His name one in all the earth. The testimony of Renwick and his associates is of permanent value and of special importance in our day, as it was directed against systems of error and idolatry, which serve to corrupt the Church and enslave the State. Against Popery in every form Renwick was a heroic and uncompromising witness. At the peril of life, he publicly testified against the usurpation of the papist James, and rejected him as having no claim to be regarded as a constitutional sovereign, and as utterly disqualified to reign in a Protestant reformed land. This was the main ground of his objection against James' toleration, for which the Indulged ministers tendered obsequious thanks to the usurper. Yet this edict of toleration was issued for the purpose of opening the way for the practice of Rome's abominations, and for the advancement of papists to places of power and trust in the nation. None of the Cameronians would, for any earthly consideration, even to save their lives, for a moment admit that a papist had any right to exercise political power in a reformed land. Our martyred forefathers we regard as worthy of high respect and imitation, for their deeply cherished dread of the growing influence of Popery, and for their determined resistance to its exclusive and extravagant claims. The system of Popery is the abnegation of all precious gospel truth; and is a complete politico-religious confederacy against the best interests of a Protestant nation. The boast of its abettors is that it is semper eadem, ever the same. Rome cannot reform herself from within, and she is incapable of reformation from external influences and agencies. The Bible never speaks of Antichrist as to be reformed, but as waxing worse and worse till the time when he shall be completely subverted and irrecoverably destroyed. Whatever changes may be going on in some Popish countries, whereby the power of the Papacy is weakened, it is evident that the principles and spirit of the Romish priesthood, and of those who are under their influence, remain unchanged. The errors of the anti-Christian system, instead of being diminished, have of late years increased. Creature worship has become more marked and general. The Immaculate Conception has been proclaimed by Papal authority as the creed of Romanism. In these countries, and some other Protestant lands, the influence of Popery in government and education, and so on the whole social system, has been greatly on the increase. Among those who have most deeply studied inspired prophecy, there is a general expectation that the period of Babylon's downfall is hastening on, and is not far distant. There is a general presentiment too, that the Man of Sin, prior to his downfall, will make some dire and violent attempt through his infatuated followers against the truth, and against such as faithfully maintain it. The 'Slaying of the Witnesses,' which we are disposed to regard as yet future may take place, not so much by the actual shedding of blood, though it is plain that Jesuit policy and violence will not hesitate to re-enact former persecution and massacre, to accomplish a desired purpose. It may mainly be effected, as Scott, the expositor, suggests, by silencing the voice of a public testimony in behalf of fundamental truths throughout Christendom; and of this there are at present unmistakable signs not a few, throughout the churches in various countries. The Protestant church in all its sections should be thoroughly awake to its danger from the destructive errors, idolatry and power of its ancient irreconcilable enemy; and should, by all legitimate means, labour to counteract and nullify its political influence. The ministry and the rising youth of the church should study carefully the Popish controversy, and should be intimately acquainted with the history of the rise and progress of the Papacy its assumed blasphemous power its accumulated errors and delusions, and its plots, varied persecutions and cruel butcheries of Christ's faithful witnesses. Above all, they should set themselves earnestly, prayerfully and perseveringly to diffuse the Bible and Gospel light in the dark parts of their native country, and among Romanists in other lands. By embracing fully and holding fast, in their practical application, the principles of the British Covenants, and by imbibing the spirit of covenanted martyrs men like Renwick and the Cameronians, we will be prepared for the last conflict with Antichrist. The firm and faithful maintenance of a martyr-testimony will be a principle instrument of the victory of truth over the error and idolatry of Rome. They overcame him by the blood of the Lamb, and the word of their testimony; and they loved not their lives unto the death, (Rev. 12:11 [Revelation 12:11]). Finally, the testimony of Renwick is valuable, as throwing light on great evils connected with systems of civil government, and with Protestant churches, and as pointing out clearly the duty of faithful witnesses in relation to them. Two great principles, the one doctrinal, and the other practical, were essential to it, or rather constituted its whole specialty. These were, first, that, according to the national vows, and the reformation attainments, the whole civil polity of the nation should be conformed to the Scriptures, and secondly, the positive duty of distinct separation from whatever systems in the state and church that are opposed to entire allegiance to Messiah the Prince." (Houston, The Life of James Renwick, pp. 52-55)
    "Some of them, particularly in Scotland, loved not their lives unto death for the word of God, and for the testimony which they held. Rev. vi. 9 [Revelation 6:9]. These refused to have communion in public ordinances not only with prelatical ministers, but even with the acceptors of indulgences or licenses from the civil power, to exercise their ministry under certain limitations. The INFORMATORY VINDICATION, which certainly contains the genuine principles of church communion, held by the sufferers for the cause of Christ in that period, declares, that they could by no means own or countenance the administrations of the indulged ministers; because they considered the indulgence, in any of the forms in which it was granted by the civil power, as derived from the supremacy claimed by that power in ecclesiastical matters; as laying the office of the ministry under unwarrantable restriction; and as tending, in a great measure, to suppress and bury the covenanted reformation, cf. Informatory Vindication, Head iv." (Anderson, Alexander and Rufus; or a Series of Dialogues on Church Communion [1862], p. 294)
    "To the friends of evangelical truth, and the faithful witnesses for the redeemer's royal prerogatives, the services of Renwick, at the crisis in which he exercised his public ministry, were invaluable. He was eminently the man for the time. Through the influence of the unhappy Indulgence, the strict Covenanters were reduced to what they style themselves in the Informatory Vindication, a 'wasted, suffering, anti-popish, anti-prelatic, anti-erastian, anti-sectarian remnant.' By the death of Cargill and Cameron, they were left as 'sheep without a shepherd,' broken and scattered. Through the fierceness of persecution, and the machinations of enemies, they were in danger of falling into confusion, and of being entirely wasted and destroyed. We admire the gracious providence of God in preparing, at this particular crisis, an instrument of such rare and suitable endowments for feeding 'the flock in the wilderness,' and for unfurling and upholding so nobly the 'Banner of Truth' amidst hosts of infuriated enemies. James Renwick, though a very youth when he entered on his arduous work, and trained under great outward disadvantages, had a powerful and well-cultivated mind. He was endowed with singular administrative talent, and had great tact and skill in managing men. He was an acute and logical thinker, an eloquent and attractive public speaker, and was distinguished by fertility and force as a writer. The INFORMATORY VINDICATION his testimony against King James' 'toleration, with his 'Letters,' and 'Sermons and Lectures,' bear ample evidence of his sound judgment, comprehensive mind, and ability as an author. His prudence, meekness and loving disposition, combined with his sanctified zeal, and heroic courage, deservedly gave him great influence among those to whom he ministered. He was eminently fitted to be 'a first man among men.' The Lord held him in the hollow of his hand, and made him a 'polished shaft in his quiver.' The services which Renwick rendered to the Protestant cause were invaluable. He organized the scattered remnant, and imparted new life and ardour to their proceedings. He set forth clearly the principles of the 'Society people;' and in a number of able and logical papers, clearly defined their plans of action. He rendered it, in a great measure, impossible for enemies to misrepresent and accuse them falsely to the Government. He was their Secretary in their correspondence with foreign churches; and he did much to evoke the prayerful sympathy of Protestants in other lands in behalf of the victims of persecution in Scotland. The presence and influence of Renwick among the suffering Presbyterians were of the highest importance in his own day; and not to them alone, but also to the whole church of Christ in these lands, and to the constitutional liberties of the nation. So far as we can see, but for the singular power and devoted spirit of Renwick, and the firm and unyielding position which the Cameronians through him were led to assume, the cause of truth would have been completely borne down, and Erastianism, and Popery, and Despotism had triumphed. Renwick and his followers were the vanguard 'in the struggle for Britain's liberties, and for the Church's spiritual independence.' Though, like other patriots born before their time, they were doomed to fall, yet posterity owes to them a large part of the goodly heritage which they enjoy. (Houston, The Life of James Renwick [1865], pp. 36-37). Emphases added throughout the preceding quotations. This is a very rare and valuable specimen of Paleopresbyterian (Covenanter), thought don't miss it! 142 pages, plus new material added by the present publisher." -- Publisher
    An Informatory Vindication, 1687, James, Renwick, Alexander Shields and Other "Society People"
    http://www.truecovenanter.com/societies/informatory_vindication.html

    *Roberts, William Louis (1798-1864), The Duty of Nations, in Their National Capacity, to Acknowledge and Support the True Religion, 1853. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #25.
    "Excerpted from THE REFORMED PRESBYTERIAN CATECHISM below, this book deals with the inescapable necessity, of the demand found in the Word of God, for the Civil establishment of Christ as King and Lawgiver over every nation on earth. If you are sick of the cease-fire with humanism, set forth by the syncretistic, Satanic and pragmatic pagan politicians of our day (those who bargain with votaries of Antichrist [the Pope], publicly tolerate all manner of false religions (e.g. Islam), and idolatry, and comprise their policy and draw their pretended authority from the beast [and not the Word of God], this book is for you! For all pagan politics is summed up in the words of the Cameronian (Covenanter) political philosopher Alexander Shields, as 'rotting away under the destructive distempers of detestable neutrality, loathsome lukewarmness, declining, and decaying in corruptions, defections, divisions, distractions, confusions; and so judicially infatuated with darkness and delusions, that they forget and forego the necessary testimony of the day.' (A Hind let Loose. 1797 edition, p. 20). Pick up this book and begin the political walk in the 'footsteps of the flock,' traveling the covenanting road of Reformation and Scripture (with the magisterial Reformers of the past)!" -- Publisher
    On the Duty of Covenanting and the Permanent Obligations of Religious Covenants, being section 11 in the Reformed Presbyterian Catechism, 1853, by William L. Roberts
    http://www.swrb.com/newslett/actualnls/PresCatCov.htm
    A Hind Let Loose; Or An Historical Representation of the Testimonies of the Church of Scotland. . . . by Mr. Alexander Shields, Minister of the Gospel, in St. Andrews
    http://www.truecovenanter.com/shields/
    A Hind let Loose: or, An Historical Representation of the Testimonies of the Church of Scotland, for the Interest of Christ: With the True State Thereof in all its Periods, Shields, Alexander
    http://archive.org/details/hindletlooseorhi00shie
    Reformed Presbyterian Catechism, William L. Roberts D.D.
    http://archive.org/details/ReformedPresbyterianCatechism

    *Roberts, William Louis (1798-1864), The Reformed Presbyterian Catechism, ISBN: 0524065543 9780524065549. A Christian classic. Considered to be among the ten greatest books in the English language. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available from ATLA 1991-2638.
    A magnificent catechism that sets forth the Crown Rights of The King of Glory and Lord of Lords. It also presents incontrovertible evidence that the United States Constitution is not a Christian document, and that it is, in fact, a slavery document.
    "A manual of instruction, drawing from such notable authors as William Symington and J.R. Willson, presenting 'arguments and facts confirming and illustrating the 'Distinctive Principles' of the Reformed Presbyterian Church. Chapters deal with: 'Christ's Mediatorial Dominion in General;' Christ's Exclusive Headship Over the Church;' 'The Supreme and Ultimate Authority of the Word of God in the Church;' Civil Government, the Moral Ordinance of God;' Christ's Headship Over the Nations;' 'The Subjection of the Nations to God and to Christ;' The Word, or Revealed Will of God, the Supreme Law in the State;' 'The Duty of Nations, in Their National Capacity, to Acknowledge and Support the True Religion:' 'The Spiritual Independence of the Church of Christ:' 'The Right and Duty of Dissent From an Immoral Constitution of Civil Government;' 'The Duty of Covenanting, and the Permanent Obligations of Religious Covenants;' 'The Application of These Principles to the Governments, Where Reformed Presbyterians Reside, in the Form of a Practical Testimony;' and finally 'Application of the Testimony to the British Empire. . . '." -- Publisher
    Reformed Presbyterian Catechism, William L. Roberts D.D.
    http://archive.org/details/ReformedPresbyterianCatechism
    Roberts, William, On the Mediatorial Dominion of The Lord Jesus Christ, excerpted from THE REFORMED PRESBYTERIAN CATECHISM.
    http://www.truecovenanter.com/reformedpresbyterian/roberts_rp_catechism_section_01_mediatorial_dominion.html
    Roberts, William, The Exclusive Headship of The Lord Jesus Christ Over the Church of God, excerpted from the REFORMED PRESBYTERIAN CATECHISM.
    http://www.truecovenanter.com/reformedpresbyterian/roberts_rp_catechism_section_02_christs_headship_over_the_church.html
    Roberts, William, Civil Government the Moral Ordinance of God, excerpted from THE REFORMED PRESBYTERIAN CATECHISM.
    http://www.truecovenanter.com/reformedpresbyterian/roberts_rp_catechism_section_04_civil_government.html
    Roberts, William, On Christ's Headship Over the Nations, excerpted from THE REFORMED PRESBYTERIAN CATECHISM.
    http://www.truecovenanter.com/reformedpresbyterian/roberts_rp_catechism_section_05_christs_headship_over_nations.html
    Roberts, William, The Subjection of the Nations to God and to Christ, excerpted from the REFORMED PRESBYTERIAN CATECHISM.
    http://www.truecovenanter.com/reformedpresbyterian/roberts_rp_catechism_section_06_subjection_of_nations_to_christ.html
    See also: The Scottish Covenanting Struggle, Alexander Craighead, and the Mecklenburg Declaration, SECRET PROCEEDINGS AND DEBATES OF THE CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION, CONSPIRACY IN PHILADELPHIA: THE ORIGINS OF THE U.S. CONSTITUTION, and A THEOLOGICAL INTERPRETATION OF AMERICAN HISTORY.

    *Rutherford, Samuel (1600-1661), A Free Disputation Against Pretended Liberty of Conscience, 1649. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #9, #25, and #26.
    "Rutherford's FREE DISPUTATION, though scarce, is still one of his most important works with maybe only a few copies of the actual book left in existence. Though Rutherford is affectionately remembered in our day for his LETTERS, or for laying the foundations of constitutional government (against the divine right of kings), in his unsurpassed LEX, REX his FREE DISPUTATION should not be overlooked for it contains the same searing insights as LEX, REX. In fact, this book should probably be known as Rutherford's 'politically incorrect' companion volume to LEX, REX. A sort of sequel aimed at driving pluralists and antinomians insane. Written against 'the Belgick Arminians, Socinians, and other Authors contending for lawlesse liberty, or licentious Tolerations of Sects and Heresies,' Rutherford explains the undiluted Biblical solution to moral relativism, especially as it is expressed in ecclesiastical and civil pluralism! (Corporate pluralism being a violation of the first commandment and an affront to the holy God of Scripture). He also deals with conscience, toleration, penology (punishment), and the judicial laws, as related to both the civil and ecclesiastical realms. Excellent sections are also included which address questions related to determining the fundamentals of religion, how covenants bind us, the perpetual obligation of social covenants (with direct application to the Solemn League and Covenant and the covenant-breaking of Cromwell and his sectarian supporters), whether the punishing of seducing teachers be persecution of conscience, and much more. Walker adds these comments and context regarding Rutherford's FREE DISPUTATION, 'The principle of toleration was beginning to be broached in England, and in a modified shape to find acceptance there. Samuel Rutherford was alarmed, or rather, I should say, he was horrified, for he neither feared the face of man or argument. He rushed to the rescue of the good old view . . . It is not so easy to find a theoretical ground for toleration; and Rutherford has many plausible things to say against it. With the most perfect confidence, he argues that it is alike against Scripture and common sense that you should have two religions side by side. It is outrageous ecclesiastically, it is sinful civilly. He does not, however, take what I call the essentially persecuting ground. He does not hold that the magistrate is to punish religion as religion. Nay, he strongly maintains that the civil magistrate never aims at the conscience. The magistrate, he urges, does not send anyone, whether a heretic (who is a soul murderer -- RB), or a murderer, to the scaffold with the idea of producing conversion or other spiritual result, but to strengthen the foundations of civil order. But if he gives so much power to the king, he is no lover of despotism withal: the king himself must be under law. To vindicate this great doctrine is the object of another book, the celebrated LEX, REX; of which it has been said by one competent to judge, that it first clearly developed the constitutionalism which all men now accept.' (Theology and Theologians . . . pp. 11-12). In our day Francis Schaeffer, and numerous others, have critiqued many of the problems found in modern society, but most have spent little time developing explicitly Biblical solutions especially regarding the theoretical foundations that Rutherford addresses here. Rutherford's FREE DISPUTATION provides a detailed blueprint for laying the foundations that must be laid before any lasting, God-honoring solutions will be found. Furthermore, Rutherford and his writings were the enemies of all governments not covenanted with Christ. This book will give you a very clear picture as to why 'the beast' (civil and ecclesiastical), has reserved his special hatred for such teaching. As Samuel Wylie noted 'the dispute, then, will not turn upon the point whether religion should be civilly established . . . but it is concerning what religion ought to be civilly established and protected, -- whether the religion of Jesus alone should be countenanced by civil authority, or every blasphemous, heretical, and idolatrous abomination which the subtle malignity of the old serpent and a heart deceitful above all things and desperately wicked, can frame and devise, should be put on an equal footing therewith." -- The Two Sons of Oil; or, the Faithful Witness for Magistracy and Ministry Upon a Scriptural Basis. Can our generation swallow Rutherford's hard, anti-pluralistic, Covenanter medicine, poured forth from the bottle of the first commandment, without choking on their carnal dreams of a free and righteous society divorced from God (and His absolute claims upon everyone and everything)? Not without the enabling power of the Holy Spirit -- that is for sure! In summary, this book answers all the hardest questions theonomists (and their wisest and best opponents), have been asking for the last 20-30 years (and these answers are much more in depth than any we have seen in the last couple of millennia [less about a century to account for the apostles]). As the reader will discover, Rutherford was a wealthy man when it came to wisdom (and much advanced theologically), and those who take the time to gaze into the King's treasure house, as exhibited in this book, will find that they are greatly rewarded. Furthermore, because of its uncompromising stand upon the Word of God, this book is sure to be unpopular among a wicked and adulterous generation. However, on the other hand, it is sure to be popular among the covenanted servants of King Jesus! This is one of the best books (in the top five anyway), for advanced study of the Christian faith. We have now obtained an easy-to-read, amazingly clear copy of this very rare, old treasure. Great price too, considering that a copy of the 1649 edition, containing this quality of print, would likely cost upwards of $1000 on the rare book market -- though it is unlikely you would ever see a copy for sale!" -- Publisher
    A Brotherly and Free Epistle to the Patrons and Friends of Pretended Liberty of Conscience, Samuel Rutherford
    http://www.truecovenanter.com/anti_toleration/rutherfurd_epistle_against_pretendedlibertyofconscience.html
    Brutus, Junius, The Covenant Between God and Kings, from A DEFENSE OF LIBERTY
    http://www.constitution.org/vct/vindiciae1a.htm

    *Rutherford, Samuel (1600-1661), The Glory, Majesty, Dominion and Power of Jesus Christ, 1643. Alternate title: A SERMON PREACHED TO THE HONORABLE HOUSE OF COMMONS: AT THEIR LATE SOLEMNE FAST, WEDNESDAY, JANU. 31. 1643. BY SAMUEL RUTHERFURD, PROFESSOR OF DIVINITIE IN THE UNIVERSITIE OF ST. ANDREWS. PUBLISHED BY ORDER OF THE HOUSE OF COMMONS. [Daniel 6:26], 1644. A Christian classic. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available [THE GLORY, MAJESTY, DOMINION AND POWER OF JESUS CHRIST, 1643] on Reformation Bookshelf CD #9, #25, and #29.
    "Here Rutherford covers a wide range of topics including Christ's kingship and dominion over civil governments, what lawful power (civil and ecclesiastical), is, God's providence, suffering (especially among those covenanted to Him), the oppression and martyrdom of the saints, the wrath of God, apologetics, the fear of God, the visible church, assurance and the weak believer, the free offer of the Gospel, the sovereignty of God, antinomianism, Arminianism, and much more. However, whatever the subject, Rutherford can be found focusing on and exalting the Lord Jesus Christ and His truth in a way that few others have been granted the ability to do -- notwithstanding the fact that he himself wrote, 'I have neither tongue nor pen to express to you the happiness of such as are in Christ.' (Letters of Samuel Rutherford, p. 47). Classic Rutherford, preached before some of the most powerful civil leaders of his day!" -- Publisher
    "It hath been the sin of this Land, that when Episcopacy, anti-Christian Ceremonies, Superstition, and Will-worship were enjoined by Law, to pleasure an earthly King, you willingly followed after the command, against the direction of the King of Kings: and now hath the Lord delivered the people of the Land into the hand of their KING. And for this the Sword of the Lord hath gone through the Land." -- Samuel Rutherford

    *Rutherford, Samuel (1600-1661), Lex, rex, or The law and the Prince, ISBN: 0873779517. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #10, #25.
    " 'Lex, rex' is Latin for 'law is king.'
    "LEX, REX is 'the great political text of the Covenanters.' (Johnston citing Innes in Treasury of the Scottish Covenant, p. 305). 'Rutherford was the first to formulate the great constitutional principle Lex est Rex -- the law is King . . . much of the doctrine has become the constitutional inheritance of all countries in modern times.'
    "Gilmour writes [in SAMUEL RUTHERFORD], 'that, as regards religious fervour, scholastic subtlety of intellect, and intensity of ecclesiastical conviction, Samuel Rutherford is the most distinctively representative Scotsman in the first half of the seventeenth century'." -- Publisher
    "Without a doubt one of the greatest books on political philosophy ever written. Rutherford here has penned a great Christian charter of liberty against all forms of civil tyranny -- vindicating the Scriptural duty to resist tyrants as an act of loyalty to God." -- Publisher
    "That resistance to lawful authority -- even when that authority so called has, in point of fact, set at nought 'all law' -- is in no instance to be vindicated, will be held by those only who are the devotees of arbitrary power and passive obedience. The principles of Mr. Rutherford's LEX, REX, however obnoxious they may be to such men, are substantially the principles on which all government is founded, and without which the civil magistrate would become a curse rather than a blessing to a country. They are the very principles which lie at the basis of the British Constitution, and by whose tenure the House of Brunswick does at this very moment hold possession of the throne of these realms." -- Rev. Robert Burns, D.D., in his "Preliminary Dissertation" to Wodrow's Church History
    Additional sources of text related to LEX REX are as follows:
    "Though Rutherford is affectionately remembered in our day for his LETTERS, or for laying the foundations of constitutional government (against the divine right of kings), in his unsurpassed LEX, REX, his FREE DISPUTATION should not be overlooked, for it contains the same searing insights as LEX, REX. In fact, this book [A FREE DISPUTATION AGAINST PRETENDED LIBERTY OF CONSCIENCE -- compiler] should probably be known as Rutherford's 'politically incorrect' companion volume to LEX, REX. It is a sort of sequel aimed at driving pluralists and antinomians insane. Written against 'the Belgick Arminians, Socinians, and other Authors contending for lawless liberty, or licentious Tolerations of Sects and Heresies,' Rutherford explains the undiluted Biblical solution to moral relativism, especially as it is expressed in ecclesiastical and civil pluralism! (Corporate pluralism being a violation of the first commandment, and an affront to the holy God of Scripture)." -- Publisher
    A HIND LET LOOSE by Alexander Shields is sometimes referred to as 'Lex, Rex, Volume Two.'
    A Hind Let Loose; or An Historical Representation of the Testimonies of the Church of Scotland. . . . by Mr. Alexander Shields, Minister of the Gospel, in St. Andrews
    http://www.truecovenanter.com/shields/
    A Hind let Loose; or, An Historical Representation of the Testimonies of the Church of Scotland, for the Interest of Christ
    "This book sets forth the Crown rights of King Jesus, against all usurpers in both church and state, giving a history of some of faithful sufferings endured by the elect, in maintaining this truth." -- Publisher
    http://archive.org/details/hindletlooseorhi00shie
    "This [THE DUE RIGHT OF PRESBYTERIES OR A PEACEABLE PLEA FOR THE GOVERNMENT OF THE CHURCH OF SCOTLAND -- compiler], could be considered the LEX, REX of church government -- another exceedingly rare masterpiece of Presbyterianism! Characterized by Walker as sweeping 'over a wider field than most'." -- Publisher
    Rutherford, Samuel (1600-1661), Lex, rex: The law and the Prince, a Dispute for the Just Prerogative of King and People. (1843)
    http://archive.org/details/lexrexlawandpri00ruthgoog
    Lex, rex, or The law and the Prince, Samuel Rutherford
    "Rutherford is to be praised for his teaching that the king is subject to the law of God. The Bible has nothing but condemnation for those who frame mischief by a law and declares rhetorically, Shall the throne of iniquity have fellowship with thee? (Psalm 94:20). Deuteronomy 17 is the classic passage in defense of LEX, REX, wherein the king is charged to read therein all the days of his life: that he may learn to fear the Lord his God, to keep all the words of this law. (Deuteronomy 17:19)." -- Publisher
    http://www.constitution.org/sr/lexrex.htm
    Lex, rex: the law and the Prince, a Dispute for the Just Prerogative of King and People, containing the reasons and causes of the defensive wars of the kingdom of Scotland, and of their expedition for the ayd and help of their brethren of England. In which a full answer is given to a seditious pamphlet, intituled, Sacro-sancta regum majestas, penned by J. Maxwell. By S. Rutherford. [Followed by], De jure regni apud Scotos; a dialogue, tr. by R. Macfarlan (repr. from the ed. of 1799).
    http://books.google.com/books?id=jtYDAAAAQAAJ&ie=ISO-8859-1&output=html
    Brutus, Junius, The Covenant Between God and Kings, from A DEFENSE OF LIBERTY
    http://www.constitution.org/vct/vindiciae1a.htm

    *Schwertley, Brian M., and Westminster Presbyterian Church in the United States. Publications Committee, National Covenanting and Christ's Victory Over the Nations. Available at Reformed Online.
    "This is the first book-length, scholarly exposition and defense of national covenanting since 1843. This comprehensive treatment includes the binding nature of covenants, covenant renewals under the godly kings of Israel, objections to covenanting answered, the unbiblical nature of the U.S. Constitution, the unscriptural alteration of the Westminster Confession of Faith in 1789, the necessity of the Old Testament moral law for a Christian nation and the biblical requirements for civil office. In the book, Rev. Schwertley not only sets forth the biblical case for social or national covenanting in a simple and organized manner but also critiques the modern pluralistic alternatives to the original Presbyterian teaching on this topic." -- Publisher
    It was preceded by 'Social Covenanting,' a series of 31 sermons in MP3 format, given by the author starting in the summer of 2012.
    Social Covenanting series of 31 sermons by Brian Schwertley
    http://www.sermonaudio.com/search.asp?seriesOnly=true&currSection=sermonstopic&sourceid=ccc&keyword=National+Covenanting&keyworddesc=National+Covenanting

    *Scott, David, John Cunningham, and George Smeaton, What is a Moral Person? How God Views the Church and the Nations. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available in OBSERVATIONS ON THE PUBLIC COVENANTS BETWIXT GOD AND THE CHURCH: A DISCOURSE.
    "A clear and concise summary of the biblical doctrine of the moral person (i.e. that God regards churches and nations as moral entities separate from the individual members of which they are comprised). No Christian can afford not to understand this vital teaching! In many ways this is a crux of the Covenanter position, underlying as it does the issues of separation from backslidden or anti-Christian civil and church governments, the binding nature of lawful Covenants on posterity, eschatology, etc." -- Publisher
    What is a Moral Person? How God Views the Church and the Nations, David Scott, John Cunningham, and George Smeaton
    http://www.swrb.com/newslett/actualnls/moral.htm

    *Shields, Alexander (1660?-1700), A Hind Let Loose, or An Historical Representation of the Testimonies of the Church of Scotland for the Interest of Christ With the True State Thereof in all its Periods. Together with a Vindication of the Present Testimony Against Popish, Prelatical, and Malignant Enemies of That Church, as it is now Stated, for the Prerogatives of Christ, Privileges of the Church, and Liberties of Mankind; and Sealed by the Sufferings of a Reproached Remnant of Presbyterians There, Witnessing Against the Corruptions of the Time: Wherein Several Controversies of Greatest Consequence Are Enquired Into, and in Some Measure Cleared; Concerning Hearing of the Curates, Owning of the Present Tyranny, Taking of Ensnaring Oaths and Bonds, Frequenting of Field-Meetings, Defensive Resistance of Tyrannical Violence, With Several Other Subordinate Questions Useful for These Times, 1797, 1744, 1687. A Christian classic. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #2, #26.
    "First printed in 1687 (near the end of the 'killing times'), we have used the 1797 edition for this rare bound photocopy because all of the Latin has been translated into English (an obvious improvement for English readers). This rare Covenanter classic, concerning Calvinistic political philosophy and tactics of civil resistance, is comparable to Samuel Rutherford's LEX, REX; in fact it could rightly be referred to as 'Lex, Rex volume two.' It is solidly in the line of John Knox's teachings on civil disobedience and addresses numerous topics that are relevant to today's Christian. 'In A HIND LET LOOSE, Shields justified the Camerionian resistance to royal absolutism and the divine right of kings. He argued that government is divinely ordained, but the people are entitled to bring a king to judgement for wrongdoing. Parliament is commissioned by the people to oversee the nation's affairs, but the compact between the people and their rulers does not entail a forfeiture of the people's power to depose tyrants and confer authority on someone else. Government is by consent, and must justify itself to the consciences of the people. God has given men the right of self defence, and this extends to a right not only passively to resist, but also to kill relentless persecutors' writes Isbell in the Nigel Cameron, editor, DICTIONARY OF SCOTTISH CHURCH HISTORY AND THEOLOGY, p. 773. Controversial chapter titles include: 'Concerning Owning of Tyrants Authority;' 'Defensive Arms Vindicated;' 'Of Extraordinary Execution of Judgement by Private Men;' and 'Refusing to Pay Wicked Taxation Vindicated.' This book sets forth the Crown rights of King Jesus, against all usurpers in both church and state, giving a history of some of faithful sufferings endured by the elect, in maintaining this truth. It bears testimony against 'the popish, prelatical and malignant enemies' of Christ and proclaims the only true basis of liberty for mankind. 'The matter is argued with a vast abundance of Biblical illustration, and with much reference to Reformation and Puritan divines. It should be consulted, if practicable, by all who wish fully to understand the inner spirit of the Covenanting Movement,' writes Purves in FAIR SUNSHINE (p. 202). Isbell interestingly notes that Shields was once 'amanuensis to the English Puritan John Owen'." -- Publisher
    A Hind Let Loose; Or An Historical Representation of the Testimonies of the Church of Scotland. . . . by Mr. Alexander Shields, Minister of the Gospel, in St. Andrews
    http://www.truecovenanter.com/shields/
    A Hind let Loose: or, An Historical Representation of the Testimonies of the Church of Scotland, for the Interest of Christ: With the True State Thereof in all its Periods, Shields, Alexander
    http://archive.org/details/hindletlooseorhi00shie
    Brutus, Junius, The Covenant Between God and Kings, from A DEFENSE OF LIBERTY
    http://www.constitution.org/vct/vindiciae1a.htm

    *Sibbes, Richard (1577-1635), The Faithful Covenanter, 1639. Available (THE WORKS OF RICHARD SIBBES), on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #29.
    "An amazing sermon opening the narrow road of faithful covenanting -- as seen first and foremost in the Lord Jesus Christ, our perfect covenant keeper! Expounds on the four periods of time relating to the renewing of the covenant of grace in history. Shows that 'whatsoever we give the supremacy of the inward man to, whatsoever we love most, whatsoever we trust most, whatsoever we fear most, whatsoever we joy and delight in most, whatsoever we obey most -- that is our God.' Applies this to the first commandment, as a part of the law of the covenant, and works out the implications (which involve numerous areas). Goes on to give Scriptural marks whereby covenant keepers can be distinguished from covenant breakers and connects the everlasting covenant with the sacraments and their meaning. A meaty meal, recommended for those who are willing to advance theologically and practically." -- Publisher

    Singer, C. Gregg (1910-1999), John Knox, the Scottish Covenanters, and the Westminster Assembly, Acts 1:11; Romans 13 (1 of 3 audio files [MP3]). Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
    "Great historical teaching, Singer at his best!" -- Publisher
    http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?SID=124071413102

    Singer, C. Gregg (1910-1999), John Knox, the Scottish Covenanters, and the Westminster Assembly, Hebrews 11:39; 1 Peter 2:13-14 (2 of 3 audio files [MP3]). Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
    "Great historical teaching, Singer at his best!" -- Publisher
    http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?SID=125071244422

    Singer, C. Gregg (1910-1999), John Knox, the Scottish Covenanters, and the Westminster Assembly, Daniel 4:35; Acts 13:17 (3 of 3 audio files [MP3]). Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
    "Great historical teaching, Singer at his best!" -- Publisher
    http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?SID=12607114250

    *Smellie, Alexander (1857-1923), Men of the Covenant: The Story of the Scottish Church in the Years of the Persecution, 534 pages, ISBN: 0851512127. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
    " 'A great book dealing with one of the most inspiring periods of Church history,' said Dr. C. Gregg Singer. Brilliant sketches of Covenanter history addressed to ordinary readers who do not have the opportunity or leisure for protracted personal studies in this area. A testimony, as Smellie notes, to 'the dogged fighters for freedom in Church and State.' The great sufferings these Christians endured gave them a seriousness about the faith, and a 'vision' of the truth, which has been unequaled since -- stirring reading!" -- Publisher
    "Recounts the events in seventeenth century Scotland in which men and women, bound by 'covenant' to Christ, laid down their lives for His cause. Recaptures the intensity, zeal, heroism, and faith of these martyrs, as well as the craftiness and cruelty of their persecutors. First published in 1903." -- Cyril J. Barber
    Men of the Covenant (1908), volume 1 of 2
    http://archive.org/details/menofcovenant01smeluoft

    *Steele, David (1803-1887), The Two Witnesses: Their Cause, Number, Character, Furniture and Special Work, 1859. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #14.
    "This is a great companion volume to Steele's NOTES ON THE APOCALYPSE. Here Steele zeros in on and works primarily from the text of Revelation 11:13, I will give power unto my two witnesses, and they shall prophecy. Steele deals with Testimony-bearing, Antichrist, Popery, The beasts of revelation, The mark of the beast, 666, The image of the beast, Civil and ecclesiastical apostasy, Reformation, Covenanting, Heresy, Schism, Terms of communion, Slavery, Sectarianism, Mormonism, Independency, Freemasonry, History, Worship, Idolatry, Britain, The united states, Canada, Mystical babylon, The last days, The ultimate victory of the church, and a host of other subjects!
    "As is usually the case with Steele, he makes the doctrines of Scripture eminently practical. For example, note how the faithful witnesses are continually called to testify against open opposition to the Lord's Covenanted Zion and the attainments of biblical Reformation (in the faith which was once delivered unto the saints); and against whom this testimony is directed:

    'These witnesses are called and commissioned to testify especially against Antichrist -- a false christ, and therefore an opposing christ. But Christ is to be considered either personally or mystically; either abstractly in his personal rights and prerogatives, or in the concrete, in the rights and immunities of his church. There is this prejudice, too prevalent, against Christians testifying against Christians! This we are often told, is contrary to the law of charity. We have not so learned Christ. They are not all Israel which are of Israel. Much of the business of these two prophets is to oppose prophets -- to prophesy against the shepherds, Ezekiel 34:2. Moses with his miracles must confront the magicians with their enchantments, Exodus 8:19. Elijah must confront the prophets of Baal, 1 Kings 18:25. Paul must counteract false apostles, 2 Corinthians 11:13. In short, the direct object of these witnesses' testimony is apostate christendom -- those who depart from the faith, 1 Timothy 4:1 -- who have gone out from fellowship and renounced the doctrines of the apostolic church, 1 John 2:19. Their special work is to testify against error and its propagators and abettors, together with ungodliness, the natural fruit of error, rather than against pagans.' -- The Two Witnesses, p. 14
    'These two witnesses have always testified -- not formally against pagans or infidels as such; but -- against apostate Christians, as comprising an organized and complex system of opposition to the Lord and his Anointed. And just here, the witnesses have detected the secret of Antichrist's successful enterprise among the human family . . .' Many false prophets are gone out into the world. . . this is a deceiver and an Antichrist, (2 John 7). The combination is ostensibly on the side and in the interest of Christ, and the elements of which Antichrist is composed were obviously professing Christians, They went out from us, but they were not of us, for if they had been of us, they would no doubt have continued with us: but they went out, that they might be made manifest that they were not all of us. (1 John 2:19). Here is the apostasy, and so the witnesses are fully borne out in asserting that Antichrist is a great Christian apostasy! To trace the origin and development, in the organization and modifications of this enemy of all righteousness, is the special work of Christ's witnesses.' -- (The Two Witnesses, pp. 17-18)
    "Moreover, having taken his own place 'in the wilderness' (i.e. having separated himself from, and having been ostracized by the 'civilization' of the obstinately defecting RPCNA and other unfaithful denominations of his day [2 Thessalonians 3:6,14-15; Revelation 12:6, Revelation 17:3]), it was given to Steele to see and expound those grand old principles of our covenanted forefathers (who sat at Westminster and in the best Reformed churches during both the first and second Reformations -- the Scottish Presbyterians being granted the greatest measure of light as a settled body from 1638-1649).
    "Thus, if you are interested in Reformation eschatology, with some of the strongest possible application, individually and corporately (in keeping with the body of Reformed truth), it is unlikely that you will find a better introduction to these topics than this!
    "As an additional bonus we have added Steele's 19-page debate with James McLeod Willson (a prominent RPCNA minister), to this book (along with a number of other pertinent documents). Since Steele references this theological clash in his preface to the TWO WITNESSES this makes a fitting appendix to add to this work.
    "We hope that you obtain and study this fine work -- and that you will find it edifying, as well as a useful weapon in your battle with the beasts of Revelation." -- Publisher
    The Two Witnesses: Their Cause, Number, Character, Furniture, and Special Work, 1859, Steele, David (1803-1887)
    http://www.covenanter.org/reformed/2015/8/17/david-steeles-pamphlet-on-the-two-witnesses-their-cause-number-character-furniture-and-special-work
    The Two Witnesses, Their Cause, Number, Character, Furniture and Special Work, Steele, David (1803-1887)
    http://www.truecovenanter.com/steele/steele_two_witnesses.html

    *Stewart, James (1635-1713), and James Stirling (1631-1672?), Naphtali, or The Wrestlings of the Church of Scotland for the Kingdom of Christ, From the Beginning of the Reformation of Religion Unto the Year, 1667: Together with the last speeches and testimonies of some who have died for the truth since the year 1660: Whereunto also are subjoined, a relation of the sufferings and death of Mr. Hugh McKail, and some instances of the sufferings of Galloway and Nithisdale, 1693. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #2.
    "Stewart, a Covenanter lawyer and writer, is characterized by Wodrow as 'a great Christian, and an able Statesman, one of the greatest Lawers ever Scotland bred, of universall learning, of vast reading, great and long experience in publick business . . .' (Analecta II, 205).
    "This book is 'the product of joint authorship. The first and logical part of this famous covenanting work was executed by Sir James Stewart of Goodtrees; it bears the stamp of a mind of great vigor and grasp. The narrative portion was written by the Rev. James Stirling of Paisley, whose RECOLLECTIONS form an interesting portion of Wodrow's ANALECTA. In 1667 the Council issued a proclamation against NAPHTALI, ordering it to be burned. (Wod., II., 100). All copies were to be delivered up to the nearest magistrates, and a fine of ten thousand pounds Scots was the penalty inflicted upon any in whose hands the book should afterwards be found. It passed through the flames unscathed only to become dearer than ever to the Scottish hearts . . . and you cannot help admiring the manly sense, spirit, calmness, dignity, and piety which distinguished the sufferers to a degree so equal that you fancy them a band of brothers.' (cited in Johnston, ,Treasury of the Scottish Covenant, pp. 375-367). A rare old gem of 559 pages." -- Publisher

    *Symington, Andrew (1785-1853), Headship of Christ Over the Nations, 1841. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #13, #25.
    "Provides Scriptural evidences for Christ's headship over the nations and the church, demonstrating the importance of this doctrine to the kingdom of Christ. A lecture excerpted from the book LECTURES ON THE PRINCIPLES OF THE SECOND REFORMATION, edited by Andrew Symington." -- Publisher
    Lectures on the Principles of the Second Reformation
    http://www.covenanter.org/reformed/2015/8/18/the-reformed-presbyterian-churchs-of-scotland-lectures-on-the-principles-of-the-second-reformation

    *Thomson, John Henderson (editor), John McMain, and David Scott (introduction), A Cloud of Witnesses for the Royal Prerogatives of Jesus Christ Being the Last Speeches and Testimonies of Those who Have Suffered for the Truth in Scotland Since, 1680. Alternate title: THE FIFTEENTH EDITION, ENLARGED AND CORRECTED: A CLOUD OF WITNESSES, FOR THE ROYAL PREROGATIVES OF JESUS CHRIST: OR, THE LAST SPEECHES AND TESTIMONIES OF THOSE WHO HAVE SUFFERED FOR THE TRUTH IN SCOTLAND, SINCE THE YEAR 1680: WITH AN APPENDIX, CONTAINING THE QUEENSFERRY PAPER; TORWOOD EXCOMMUNICATION; A RELATION CONCERNING MR. RICHARD CAMERON, MR. DONALD CARGIL, AND HENRY HALL; AND AN ACCOUNT OF THOSE WHO WERE KILLED WITHOUT PROCESS OF LAW, AND BANISHED TO FOREIGN LANDS: WITH A SHORT VIEW OF SOME OF THE OPPRESSIVE EXACTIONS, ISBN: 0873779231. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
    "With the Testimonies of John Nisbet the Younger, John Nisbet of Hardhill, Robert Miller, Thomas Harkness, &c. A Letter of John Semple's and of Archibald Stewart's. The Paper found upon Mr. Cameron at Airsmoss, and an Acrostick upon his name. The Testimony of John Finlay in Kilmarnock. The Epitaphs upon the Grave Stones of Mr. Samuel Rutherford, Mr. John Welwood, and the noble Patriots who fell at Pentland-hills, &c.
    "Also includes The Testimony of some persecuted Presbyterian Ministers of the Gospel, unto the Covenanted Reformation of the Church of Scotland, and to the present expediency of continuing to preach the Gospel in the fields, and against the present anti-Christian Toleration in its nature and design, &c. Given in to the Ministers at Edinburgh, by Mr. James Renwick, upon the 17th Jan. 1688. And Mr. Richard Cameron's Last Sermon; preached on Kype Water in Evandale, July 18th, 1680, three days before he was killed at Airs-moss. (Pittsburgh: Printed for David Reed, by Eichbaum & Johnston, 1824), 1884 edition.
    Wherefore seeing we also are compassed about with so great a cloud of witnesses, let us lay aside every weight, and the sin which doth so easily beset us, and let us run with patience the race that is set before us, Looking unto Jesus the author and finisher of our faith; who for the joy that was set before him endured the cross, despising the shame, and is set down at the right hand of the throne of God. (Hebrews 12:1,2)
    "Presbyterian Covenanter martyrs of Scotland, their last speeches and testimonies. The first edition appeared in 1714, and as more material was collected it was added to the 15 editions that were printed over the next 100 years."
    "An amazing book compiled to show how -- and especially why (from their own dying testimonies) -- the Covenanters suffered, bled and died. These brave martyrs for Christ laid the foundation for liberty and truth in both church and state. They have much to say to us today . . . . Though the issues and ferocity of persecution (by the Popes, prelates, and Erastians), were more obvious during the times covered in this book, the message to contemporary Christians could not be clearer: we are involved in a life and death struggle. Few books are this moving or this edifying -- a real treasure! (658 pp., 1884 ed.)." -- Publisher
    The 1871 edition was praised by Spurgeon.
    A Cloud of Witnesses, 1871 edition, free online e-text. Original from Oxford University. Digitized Aug 31, 2006.
    http://books.google.com/books?id=4vMCAAAAQAAJ&dq=thomson+a+cloud+of+witnesses&ie=ISO-8859-1

    *Westminster Assembly (1643-1652), The Westminster Confession of Faith (1646), [completed and first printed in 1646, approved by the Assembly, August 27, 1647, Session 23 -- compiler] (Glasgow, Scotland: Free Presbyterian Publication [133 Woodlands Road, Glasgow G3 6LE], 1994), ISBN: 0902506080 (casebound), and ISBN: 0902506358 (paperback). Among the ten greatest works in the English language. Available (THE WESTMINSTER CONFESSION OF FAITH (1646) with all its subordinate documents in searchable format) on the Puritan Hard Drive. Also available (THE WESTMINSTER CONFESSION OF FAITH (1646) with all its subordinate documents in searchable format) on Reformation Bookshelf CD #1.
    Westminster Confession of Faith (1646) With Scripture Proofs
    http://www.reformed.org/documents/wcf_with_proofs/
    Westminster Assembly (1643-1652), The Confession of Faith, the Larger and Shorter Catechisms, With the Scripture Proofs at Large: Together With The sum of Saving Knowledge (contained in the Holy Scriptures, and held forth in the said Confession and Catechisms), and Practical use Thereof, Covenants National and Solemn League, Acknowledgment of Sins and Engagement to Duties, Directories, Form of Church-government, &c. of Public Authority in the Church of Scotland, With Acts of Assembly and Parliament, Relative to, and Approbative of the Same (1757) [the original version of 1646, prior to the changes of the "American Version" of 1789 -- compiler]
    http://archive.org/details/confessionofscot00chur
    " 'The product of Puritan conflict,' stated Shedd, reaching 'a perfection of statement never elsewhere achieved.' All that learning the most profound and extensive, intellect the most acute and searching, and piety the most sincere and earnest, could accomplish, was thus concentrated in the Westminster Assembly's Confession of Faith, which may be safely termed the most perfect statement of Systematic Theology ever framed by the Christian Church,' writes Hetherington. (The History of the Westminster Assembly of Divines, p. 345).
    "Concerning The Shorter Catechism, which is one of the items also included in this book, Mitchell notes: 'it is a thoroughly Calvinistic and Puritan catechism, the ripest fruit of the Assembly's thought and experience, maturing and finally fixing the definitions of theological terms to which Puritanism for half a century had been leading up and gradually coming closer and closer to in its legion of catechisms.' (Westminster Assembly: Its History and Standards, p. 431).
    "THE WESTMINSTER CONFESSION OF FAITH (1646) is the greatest of all the creeds of the Christian church. The church of Christ cannot be creedless and live. Especially in an age of doubt and confusion, it is her duty to define and proclaim the one true faith. Nowhere has the Reformed church done this so effectively as in the WESTMINSTER CONFESSION, and family of documents. This book represents Reformed thinking at its purest and best. It was intended, as part of the Covenanted Reformation taking place during its compilation, to be adopted as the binding confessional standard for every individual, family, court, church, and legislature in the British Isles." -- Publisher
    This is considered to be the definitive publication of the Westminster family of documents. It includes the following:

    1. "To the Christian Reader, Especially Heads of Families"
      http://www.reformed.org/documents/wcf_standards/index.html?mainframe=/documents/wcf_standards/p005-to_head_of_families.html
    2. "Mr. Thomas Manton's Epistle to the Reader"
      http://www.reformed.org/documents/wcf_standards/index.html?mainframe=/documents/wcf_standards/p005-to_head_of_families.html
    3. THE CONFESSION OF FAITH (1646), the full and original edition with Scripture proofs written out
      http://www.reformed.org/documents/wcf_with_proofs/
    4. THE LARGER CATECHISM with Scripture proofs written out
      http://www.reformed.org/documents/wlc_w_proofs/index.html
    5. THE SHORTER CATECHISM with Scripture proofs written out
      http://www.reformed.org/documents/WSC_frames.html
    6. THE SUM OF SAVING KNOWLEDGE
      http://www.reformed.org/master/index.html?mainframe=/documents/sum/sum.html
    7. "The National Covenant"
      http://www.reformed.org/documents/wcf_standards/index.html?mainframe=/documents/wcf_standards/p345-nat_covenant.html
    8. "The Solemn League and Covenant"
      http://www.reformed.org/documents/wcf_standards/index.html?mainframe=/documents/wcf_standards/p355-solemn_league.html
    9. "A Solemn Acknowledgement of Publick Sins and Breaches of the Covenant; and a Solemn Engagement to all the Duties Contained Therein"
      http://www.truecovenanter.com/covenants/scotland_covenant_renewal_1648.html
    10. THE DIRECTORY FOR PUBLIC WORSHIP
      http://www.reformed.org/documents/wcf_standards/index.html?mainframe=/documents/wcf_standards/p369-direct_pub_worship.html
    11. THE FORM OF PRESBYTERIAL CHURCH GOVERNMENT
      http://www.reformed.org/documents/wcf_standards/index.html?mainframe=/documents/wcf_standards/p395-form_presby_gov.html
    12. "The Directory for Family-Worship, Approved by the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland, for Piety and Uniformity in Secret and Private Worship, and Mutual Edification"
      http://www.reformed.org/documents/wcf_standards/index.html
    THE WESTMINSTER CONFESSION OF FAITH (1646) is said to be the finest summary of THE HOLY BIBLE available. It is recommended for daily devotions. See the following resources:
    1. THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THE WESTMINSTER STANDARDS AS A CREED
      http://www.fpcr.org/blue_banner_articles/signific.htm
    2. "The Complete Scripture Index to the Westminster Confession (1646), Larger and Shorter Catechisms." Alternate title: SCRIPTURE INDEX TO THE WESTMINSTER STANDARDS. Available on Library of Presbyterian Heritage Publications [and] Protestant Heritage Press CD. Also available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
    3. Bordwine, James, A GUIDE TO THE WESTMINSTER STANDARDS: CONFESSION OF FAITH AND LARGER CATECHISM, ISBN: 0940931303 9780940931305.
      Includes a unique, 100-page topical index to both the CONFESSION and the LARGER CATECHISM.
    4. WESTMINSTER LARGER CATECHISM WITH PROOF TEXTS
      http://www.reformed.org/documents/wlc_w_proofs/index.html
    5. THE SHORTER CATECHISM WITH SCRIPTURE PROOFS
      Arguably the greatest tract ever created, all factors considered.
      http://www.reformed.org/documents/WSC_frames.html
      THE SHORTER CATECHISM
      Free downloadable PDF file.
      http://www.greenvillepresbyterian.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/shorter-catechism.pdf
    6. Westminster Shorter Catechism Project
      "Click on any of the individual questions below to get the answer and Biblical references, as well as links to works by John Flavel, Thomas Watson, Thomas Boston, James Fisher, and John Whitecross, and others."
      http://www.shortercatechism.com/
    7. Commentaries on the Westminster Standards Including the Westminster Confession of Faith, The Larger Catechism, and The Shorter Catechism
      http://www.lettermen2.com/bcrr3ch.html#cwswcsc
    8. The Westminster Confession of Faith (1646), (The Westminster Standards), and Related Works: A Study Guide
      http://www.lettermen2.com/suggest.html
    9. The Scottish Covenanted Reformation continued the work of The Westminster Assembly. David Steel (1803-1887), is considered to be one of the most faithful Covenanter ministers in America. Notice that the citation following is an authorized, complete edition of their final TESTIMONY.
      Reformed Presbytery in North America (Steelite), David Steele (1803-1887), John Thorburn (1730?-1788), John Courtass (d. 1795), et al., ACT, DECLARATION, AND TESTIMONY, FOR THE WHOLE OF THE COVENANTED REFORMATION, AS ATTAINED TO, AND ESTABLISHED IN, BRITAIN AND IRELAND; PARTICULARLY BETWIXT THE YEARS 1638 AND 1649, INCLUSIVE. AS, ALSO, AGAINST ALL THE STEPS OF DEFECTION FROM SAID REFORMATION, WHETHER IN FORMER OR LATER TIMES, SINCE THE OVERTHROW OF THAT GLORIOUS WORK, DOWN TO THIS PRESENT DAY (1876), (Philadelphia, PA: Printed by Rue and Jones, 1876).
      This is a new edition of the Ploughlandhead Testimony of 1761. It was the subordinate standard of the original "Steelite" Reformed Presbytery that was constitutes in 1840.
      https://archive.org/details/actdeclarationte00refo
    10. Church and State
      Works listed here discuss the decline of the influence of Calvinism and the Covenanted Reformation in Great Britain and the United States. The various alterations to the Westminster Standards are also discussed.
      http://www.lettermen2.com/bcrr9chc.html#churchstate
    11. Heresies Defined and the Necessity of Heresies Explained, by George Gillespie, Scottish Commissioner to the Assembly of Divines at Westminster
      http://www.truecovenanter.com/gillespie/ggilles09.html

    *Wylie, James A. (1808-1890), Story of the Covenant and the Service of the Covenanters to the Reformation in Christendom and the Liberties of Great Britain, 1880. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
    "A fine historical introduction to the battle for Godly government and liberty against the forces of anti-Christian bondage (to national sin and Satanic deception). The Covenanters are responsible, more than any other group historically, for maintaining 'the crown rights of King Jesus' -- even at peril of severe torture and the loss of their earthly lives. Their covenanting principles are still the purest and most faithful form of Christianity known to man, and the revival of these eminently Biblical views are a sure hope for the future! For a more extensive 'Camerionian' treatment of this subject: Howie's SCOTS WORTHIES." -- Publisher

    *Wylie, Samuel B. (1773-1852), The Two Sons of Oil; or, The Faithful Witness for Magistracy and Ministry Upon a Scriptural Basis (1850 edition, reprinted 1995). A Christian classic. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #13, #26.
    "A Covenanter classic opening Revelation 11:3-4 and Zechariah 4:14. It has been hailed as the 'best presentation of the position of the Covenanter Church that has been written.' Noting that the 'time has been, when the whole body of Presbyterians, in Scotland, England, and Ireland, unanimously subscribed' to these principles, 'for civil and ecclesiastical reformation' and that thousands bled and died for the glorious covenanted cause of civil and ecclesiastical reformation; Wylie sets out to explain and defend 'that cause. Not because it is an ancient cause; not because many have sealed it with their blood; but, because,' as he says, 'I thought it the doctrine of the Bible, and the cause of Christ.' This book explains how to tell if a government (especially a civil government), is faithful to Christ and thus to be obeyed for conscience's sake. It also gives direction regarding when and how to resist (and disassociate), yourself from governments which get their power from 'the beast.' Moreover, this book gives clear testimony as to what the Bible requires of civil magistrates, noting 'that civil rulers should exercise their power in protecting and defending the religion of Jesus.' It also gives plain reasons why dissent from the government of the United States (and other covenant breaking nations), is the legitimate Scriptural pattern." -- Publisher
    The Two Sons of Oil; or, the Faithful Witness for Magistracy and Ministry Upon a Scriptural Basis, Samuel B. Wylie
    http://www.swrb.com/newslett/actualNLs/two-sons-of-oil.htm
    The Two Sons of Oil, or, The Faithful Witness for Magistracy and Ministry Upon a Scriptural Basis (1850),
    Samuel Brown Wylie and James McLeod Willson
    http://archive.org/details/twosonsofoilorfa00wylirich

    See also: The sovereignty of god, The doctrine of man (human nature, total depravity), Covetousness, greed, selfishness, The inspiration and infallibility of scripture (the doctrine of revelation, the doctrine of plenary inspiration, the doctrine of divine inspiration, the doctrine of verbal inspiration, The ten commandments: the moral law, Trusting god, Idolatry, Immanuel, christ's presence, christ in you, Justifying faith, Justification, Forgiveness, Sanctification, Glorification, Theft, Sexual relationship, Spiritual adultery (spiritual whoredom/harlotry), Idolatry, syncretism, Sexual wholeness, Rebellion and lawlessness: wickedness, demonic possession, substance abuse, abnormal behavior, insanity, mental illness, mental retardation, Repentance, the key to salvation and change, Justice, the theology of judgment, god's final judgment, the great white throne judgment, the day of the lord, The sovereign grace of god: his everlasting mercy and lovingkindness, Covenant theology and the ordinance of covenanting, The covenanted reformation, Background and history of the covenanted reformation of scotland, Covenanted reformation short title listing, Selection of covenant heads for positions of leadership, The one and the many, Corporate faithfulness and sanctification, Individual responsibility for corporate faithfulness and sanctification, Unfaithful reformed ministries, Secret societies, ungodly alliances, voluntary associations, Conspiracy and corruption, and so forth, and so on.

    Related WebLinks

    The Westminster Confession of Faith (1646, The Westminster Standards), and Related Works: A Study Guide
    http://www.lettermen2.com/suggest.html

    Ten Best Classics For Advanced Studies From Still Waters Revival Books
    http://www.swrb.com/ten-best.htm

    An Outline of Scottish 'Covenant History' in the 17th Century From Purves' Book FAIR SUNSHINE
    http://www.ianpaisley.org/article.asp?cov_intro.htm



    The Puritan Revolution

    *Beeke, Joel R. and Randall J. Pederson, Meet the Puritans: With A Guide to Modern Reprints, ISBN: 1601780001.
    "It's endorsed by Packer, Piper, MacArthur, Sproul, Duncan, Mohler, Ferguson -- and the recommendations go on and on.
    "It's packed with terse information, illustrations, great biographies on more than 140 individual Puritan authors, overviews of over 700 individual Puritan volumes, a list of all the known reprints published between 1956 and 2005, excellent articles, and a glossary of terms used. At 900 pages, its a deep well of information. As clothbound, it's made to endure years of use.
    "Important helps include chapters on who the Puritans are, why we should read them, and short histories of the English, Scottish and Dutch Puritans. I found the short history of the resurgence of Puritan literature in the 20th century especially interesting.
    "Here is just one quote, taken from the section explaining why we should read the Puritans today:
    With the Spirit's blessing, Puritan writings can enrich your life as a Christian in many ways as they open the Scriptures and apply them practically, probing your conscience, indicting your sins, leading you to repentance, shaping your faith, guiding your conduct, comforting you in Christ and conforming you to Him, and bringing you into full assurance of salvation and a lifestyle of gratitude to the triune God for His great salvation (xix).
    "Perfect for the beginner and the more advanced reader, MEET THE PURITANS will help guide and direct your way through the forest of Puritan authors.
    "In summary, I cannot say it better than our friend, Dr. Ligon Duncan:
    Joel Beeke and Randall Pederson have produced a tremendous gift to and resource for all who want an entryway into the study of the Puritans. They not only provide accurate biographical and theological introduction to every Puritan whose works have been reprinted in the last fifty years, but also combine with their helpful summaries an insightful analysis. If this were not enough, they've added major appendices that include the so-called Scottish Puritans (that is, the great Scottish theologians who were contemporaries of and like-minded brethren in doctrine and piety with the English Puritans), as well as the Dutch Further Reformation divines. MEET THE PURITANS, WITH A GUIDE TO MODERN REPRINTS is a must have. I know of nothing like it. If you are looking for a reliable window into the life, theology, piety and ministry of the Puritans -- this is it.
    "Like I said, a monumental work!" -- The Shepherd's Scrapebook
    The format of the book is simple. After a Preface explaining how to profit from reading the Puritans, a brief word about where to begin and a brief history of English Puritanism, there comes a long list of authors. Each author has his own chapter containing a short biography and a list of his books that have been reprinted. There is a review of each book along with publishing information and the number of pages. And that is the heart of the book and continues for some 800 pages. Five appendices deal with collections of Puritan writings, Scottish divines, Dutch further Reformation divines, secondary sources on the Puritans and a final word on Puritanism courtesy of J.I. Packer. In short, this is a one-stop-shop for all you could want to know as a beginner to the Puritans. And if you are already a fan of their writing, this book will lead you further and deeper, guiding you to the best books available." -- Reader's Comment

    Bremer, Francis J., Puritan Crisis: New England and the English Civil Wars, 1630-1670, ISBN: 082406173X 9780824061739.

    *Brook, Benjamin, Lives of the Puritans, 3 volumes, ISBN: 1877611794. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
    "This scarce three volume set was first published in 1813 in London, and there has never been a second printing until now. It contains biography and bibliography of many noted as well as relatively unknown (but not insignificant), Puritan pastors and authors of the 16th and 17th centuries. Brook's massive endeavor was, at his own admission, an updating of Edmund Calamy's classic NONCONFORMIST MEMORIAL. In volume one there are such men as Edward Deering, Bernard Gilpin, and Richard Greenham. In volume two are sketches of Thomas Gataker, Henry Smith, William Perkins, Richard Rogers, Henry Ainsworth, John Preston, Robert Bolton, William Ames, Henry Scudder, Arthur Dent, Daniel Dyke, Samuel Hieron, Nicholas Byfield, Richard Sibbes, and John Ball. Volume three contains Jeremiah Burroughs, Thomas Hooker, Thomas Shepard, Christopher Love, John Cotton, Obadiah Sedgwick, William Gouge, and Thomas Goodwin. And these are but a sampling of the hundreds of godly men you will find profiled." -- Jay P. Green, Sr.

    Gardiner, Samuel Rawson, The Constitution Documents of the Puritan Revolution, 1625-1660. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #30.
    "This period of time and thought had great bearing on the foundations of many nations, not the least of which include the United States and Canada. These documents are intended to serve either as a basis for the study of the constitutional history of this important period, or as a companion to the political history of the time. Relevant to both church and state." -- Publisher
    The Constitutional Documents of the Puritan Revolution, 1628-1660
    http://books.google.com/books?id=wAUwAAAAMAAJ&ie=ISO-8859-1&output=html

    *Geneva Bible Notes, 1599
    The GENEVA BIBLE contained "marginal notes which were heavily influenced by John Calvin, John Knox, and many other leaders of the Reformation. The GENEVA BIBLE was the predominant English translation during the period in which the English and Scottish Reformations gained great impetus. Iain Murray, in his classic work on revival and the interpretation of prophecy, THE PURITAN HOPE, notes that, 'the two groups in England and Scotland developed along parallel lines, like two streams originating at one fountain. The fountain was not so much Geneva, as the Bible which the exiles newly translated and issued with many marginal notes . . . it was read in every Presbyterian and Puritan home in both realms.' (p. 7). This time also saw the rise of the forces for covenanted Reformation against the corruption and abuses of prelacy and the royal factions. Darkness was dispelled as people read this Bible and saw for themselves that there is no authority above the Holy Scriptures.
    "Although most people today have never heard of the GENEVA BIBLE, it was so popular from 1560 to 1644 that it went through 140 plus printings. The reason for its popularity among the faithful is obvious: the marginal notes promoted a full-orbed, nation-changing Protestantism. . . !
    " 'By 1599, the GENEVA BIBLE . . . added many Calvinist annotations for household use' (Bremer, The Puritan Experiment, p. 12). A number of the notes argued for family worship and instruction by the head of the household. Puritanism in the British Isles is known as an effort to continue the Reformation of the church in the area of worship and church government. However, the Puritans also sought to reform the family life according to Biblical principles . . . as a result of their efforts they 'were creators of the English Christian marriage, the English Christian family, and the English Christian home'." (J.I. Packer, A Quest for Godliness, p. 260) -- Publisher
    1599 Geneva Bible Notes
    http://www.reformedreader.org/gbn/en.htm
    For other GENEVA NOTES text see the following listed below:

  • KING JAMES BIBLE WITH THE GENEVA BIBLE NOTES, 1672,
  • 1599 GENEVA BIBLE, Tolle Lege Press restoration,
  • THE 1599 GENEVA BIBLE, TOLLE LEGE ONLINE EDITION.
  • "1599 GENEVA BIBLE, Tolle Lege Press Restoration, Fourth Printing, 2008, Probable Errata Listing," and
  • "A Resolution That Tolle Lege Press and White Hall Press of Chicago Complete the Limited Modernization of the 1599 GENEVA BIBLE Begun in 2004."
  • *King James Bible With the Geneva Bible Notes, 1672. This is considered to be a superior text to the 1599 GENEVA BIBLE, which is said to be about 80 percent Tyndale translation. A Christian classic. Considered to be among the ten greatest books in the English language. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive and in The Amazing Christian Library.
    "The best Reformation translation (King James Version), combined with the best Bible notes of the first Reformation, the GENEVA BIBLE notes. A great tool for public, family, and private worship and study. Printed from a marvelously clean original copy, surpassing the quality of all other printings (of the GENEVA BIBLE NOTES in particular), we have seen. Contains almost 1000 (8.5 X 11 inch), pages with notes on the complete Bible (Old and New Testaments), making this a veritable library of study and classic Protestant commentary in just one book." -- Publisher
    The following title is apparently an alternative edition of the 1672 AKJV with GENEVA NOTES:
    James, King of England, Lancelot Andrewes, Theodore de Beze, Franciscus Junius, and John Canne, The Holy Bible: Containing the Old and New Testament; Newly translated out of the originall tongues and with the former translations diligently compared and revised by his Majesties speciall command; With most profitable Annotations [probably the GENEVA NOTES -- compiler] upon all the hard places, and other things of great importance; Which notes have never before been set forth with this new translation; but are now placed in due order with great care and industrie. "Publisher: [Amsterdam]: [Stephen Swart], Printed in the Year MDCLXXII."
    The Authorized King James Version of 1611 (Pure Cambridge Edition), Digital Text
    "The PURE CAMBRIDGE EDITION (first published circa 1900), is the product of the process of textual purification that has occurred since 1611 when the AUTHORIZED VERSION was completed, and has been used (often unwittingly), as the received text for many decades. Millions of copies conformed to this edition were issued by Bible and missionary societies in the twentieth century. This text stands in contrast to all other editions (especially newly edited and modernised ones). . . ." -- excerpt from Bible Protector homepage
    http://www.bibleprotector.com/

    *[Geneva Bible 1599 -- compiler] Calvin, John (1509-1564), et al. John Knox, Theodore Beza, Miles Coverdale, William Whittingham, Anthony Gilby, Martin Luther, and others], Peter A. Lillback (foreword), Tolle Lege Press (preface), Gary DeMar (Notes to the Modern Reader), Marshall Foster (The History and Impact of the Geneva Bible), 1599 Geneva Bible, (Tolle Lege Press, 2006, 2007), 1400 pages, ISBN: 0975484699 9780975484692 0975484613 9780975484616 0975484621 9780975484623. Available (Tolle Lege Press restoration) on the Puritan Hard Drive.
    "When the Pilgrims arrived in America in 1620, they brought along supplies, a consuming passion to advance the Kingdom of Christ, a bright hope for the future, and the Word of God. Clearly, their most precious cargo was the Bible. The GENEVA BIBLE, printed over 200 times between 1560 and 1644, was the most widely read and influential English Bible of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. This superb translation was the product of the best Protestant scholars of the day and became the Bible of choice for many of the greatest writers, thinkers, and historical figures of that time [but the translation was surpassed by the AUTHORIZED KING JAMES VERSION in 1611, see 'Textual Criticism' -- compiler]. The GENEVA BIBLE is unique among all other Bibles. It was the first Bible to use chapters and numbered verses and became the most popular version of its time because of the extensive marginal notes. These notes, written by Reformation leaders such as John Calvin, John Knox, Miles Coverdale, William Whittingham, Anthony Gilby, and others, were included to explain and interpret the scriptures for the common people. For nearly half a century these notes helped the people of England, Scotland, and Ireland understand the Bible and true liberty. King James despised the GENEVA BIBLE because he considered the notes on key political texts to be seditious [to question the Divine Right of Kings -- compiler] and a threat to his authority. Unlike the KING JAMES VERSION, the GENEVA BIBLE was not authorized by the government. It was truly a Bible by the people and for the people. You can see why this remarkable version with its profound marginal notes played a key role in the formation of the American Republic. Until now, the only complete version available was a large, cumbersome, and difficult-to-read facsimile edition. But this new edition contains all the original words and notes [see the errata listing below -- compiler], but the type set has been enlarged and the font style change for today's reader." -- Publisher
    "This is the Bible that eventually put an end to Feudalism in Europe, strengthened Puritans, Quakers, and came to America on the Mayflower. This was the first Bible published in the language of the common people, the first Bible to contain commentary and verse numbers, and the first Bible written in English from Greek and Hebrew texts available from Constantinople, not from the Latin Vulgate. The dynamite in this Bible is the commentary accounting for about one third of its length.
    "The Church of England and King James were so upset they determined to create a new translation. They called it the KING JAMES VERSION. They choose to use language so formal and grand, even by the standards of those days, that the common people would find difficult to understand. The GENEVA BIBLE was found seditious by it's insertions of commentary that spoke directly about the priesthood of lay believers, the church as naturally anti-oligarchy, and setting forth some other ideas considered anarchy by the King, but meaning freedom to the masses who read it. . . .
    "Important facts to remember about this Bible. The Reformation was strong in England and the Lollards were a lay group of huge influence that had to go underground. English Christian theologians, not Catholics and not Anglicans, fled in huge numbers to Geneva for freedom. Geneva was not part of Switzerland at that time, because Geneva was its own city-state. . . . The GENEVA BIBLE was printed 1560-1644. THE KING JAMES VERSION was published in 1611. The GENEVA BIBLE was against the law to own. . . ." -- Reader's Comment
    Available "in printed formats with various binding options from Tolle Lege Press. Tolle Lege Press has given Puritan Downloads permission to provide a PDF copy of their retypeset and fully searchable edition of the 1599 GENEVA BIBLE (Copyright 2006-2008, Tolle Lege Press), on the Puritan Hard Drive.
    "The GENEVA BIBLE is the Puritan Bible with Reformation promoting marginal notes authored by prominent leaders of the Reformation (during the time of John Calvin and John Knox). The New Testament was translated out of the Greek, by Theodore Beza. The GENEVA BIBLE was the predominant English translation during the period in which the English and Scottish Reformations gained great impetus.
    "Iain Murray, in his classic work on revival and the interpretation of prophecy, THE PURITAN HOPE, notes,

    The two groups in England and Scotland developed along parallel lines, like two streams originating at one fountain. The fountain was not so much Geneva, as the Bible which the exiles newly translated and issued with many marginal notes . . . it was read in every Presbyterian and Puritan home in both realms. (p. 7)
    "This time also saw the rise of the forces for covenanted Reformation against the corruption and abuses of prelacy and the royal factions. Darkness was dispelled as people read this Bible and saw for themselves that there is no authority above the Holy Scriptures. Discerning this truth, it became apparent that the civil tyranny and the heretical superstitions imposed by Pope, King and Bishops were to be resisted unto death, if necessary (i.e. because these innovations in church and state were opposed to the Kingship of Christ and the law of His kingdom, as set forth in Holy Scripture).
    "Moreover, this is the Bible that led to the King James edition. James . . . did not want the Calvinistic marginal notes of the GENEVA BIBLE getting into the hands of the people because he considered them 'seditious' hence, he authorized the KING JAMES VERSION as a substitute (though the KJV far surpasses modern translations).
    "Although most people today have never heard of the GENEVA BIBLE, it was so popular from 1560 to 1644 that it went through 140 plus printings. The reason for its popularity among the faithful is obvious: the marginal notes promoted a full-orbed, nation-changing Protestantism! Taking a modern work, such as the SCOFIELD REFERENCE BIBLE, and comparing the notes to those of the GENEVA BIBLE, it will readily be seen that the religion of the Protestant Reformation bears no resemblance to much of the nonsense being prattled today!
    "Additionally, the later editions of the GENEVA BIBLE (like this 1599 edition), are more strongly Calvinistic and anti-Papal noted by Eason in THE GENEVAN BIBLE, NOTES ON ITS PRODUCTION AND DISTRIBUTION. . . ."
    The notes of TOMSON'S NEW TESTAMENT of 1576, which took the place of the New Testament of the Bible of 1560 in many editions from 1587 onward, are entirely different from those in the GENEVA BIBLE. They are taken from Beza's Latin Testament, and are controversial and strongly Calvinistic.
    "Furthermore, Eason cites Pocock (a rabid anti-Calvinist), in the same book,
    The changes adopted in the GENEVA BIBLE and New Testament synchronize with the gradual spread of the Calvinistic heresy and the contemporaneous development of hatred of the whole Papal system of doctrine. The notes attacked the Sacramental teaching of the Church, substituting for it the Calvinistic doctrines of election and reprobation. They taught that Sacraments are nothing more than signs and seals of grace previously given to the elect. All passages about the Sacraments are explained away.
    ("We cite this quote, though it is full of a good deal of devilish nonsense, to demonstrate that even the enemies of biblical truth recognized the powerful impact that the GENEVA BIBLE was having in furthering the Protestant Reformation, as well as to show that the notes in the later versions of the GENEVA BIBLE were moving in the direction of a more distinct testimony against error and for the truth." -- RB) -- Publisher
    "There were three primary editions of the GENEVA BIBLE:
    (1) The editions that follow the first edition of 1560.
    (2) The editions in which TOMSON'S NEW TESTAMENT of 1576 is substituted for the 1560 New Testament.
    (3) The Bibles from 1598 that contain the Notes on Revelation of Francis Junius."
    "In our opinion, the notes in the 1599 edition were the most faithful to Scripture." -- The Genevan Bible, Notes on its Production and Distribution [Of course, the judgment and candor of Calvin are renown. This Bible played a key role in the Reformation, and anyone not using it 'will be the poorer for their neglect.' However, very few works are without caveats. Calvin used the LATIN VULGATE. His comments had to be translated from French. Experts (see 'Textual Criticism'), consider the authorized KING JAMES VERSION to be the most accurate translation. It used a literal approach to translation of the Traditional Text, which is referred to today as the Majority Text or Textus Receptus. Beza's translation of the New Testament is in a different category. One is urged to not neglect the knowledge developed over 400 years of Reformed scholarship since 1599. For example, compare the 1599 GENEVA BIBLE (1400 pages, 1366 in the Tolle Lege restoration edition), annotation with the annotation, theological notes, text notes, scripture notes, and other study aids of the NEW GENEVA STUDY BIBLE (2228 pages), with its own noted caveats. -- compiler]
    "Features of the Tolle Lege 1599 GENEVA BIBLE:
  • Word-for-word accuracy with the 1599 Geneva Bible [see the errata listing below -- compiler]
  • Original cross references
  • Modern spelling
  • Original study notes by Reformers
  • Old English Glossary
  • 2-page Family Tree Chart
  • Presentation page with several family registry pages
  • Easy-to-read print [see the errata listing below -- compiler]
  • Size: 8.75" X 11.5"
  • Approximately 1,400 pages." -- Publisher
  • Excerpts from two articles on the 1599 GENEVA BIBLE may be read at the Puritan Downloads site: "The Forgotten Translation," Gary DeMar, President of American Vision and Honorary Member of the 1599 Geneva Bible Advisory Board, and "Introduction to the 1599 Geneva Bible," Marshall Foster, President of the Mayflower Institute, Member of the 1599 Geneva Bible Advisory Board.
    http://www.swrb.com/bibles/bibles.htm
    "The GENEVA BIBLE has a unique place in history. It is some times called the BREECHES BIBLE. That term comes from the reference in Genesis 3:7 where it says that Adam and Eve clothed themselves in 'breeches' made from fig leaves. It is the product of Protestant scholars who had taken refuge in Geneva, Switzerland during the reign of Queen 'Bloody Mary' of England (1553-1558). It is also known as the Bible that the Pilgrims brought to America. It is older than the KING JAMES VERSION and is considered by some to be more 'Protestant' than the KING JAMES VERSION." [probably because of the Notes of the Geneva Reformers -- compiler] -- Reader's Comment
    "I've seen the facsimile versions of the GENEVA BIBLE and they don't even come close to this edition. The legibility and readability of this edition is far superior to other editions. -- Reader's Comment
    Tolle Lege Press edition of the 1599 Geneva Bible
    http://www.GenevaBible.com
    Perhaps the unique wisdom in the annotation by the Reformers, John Calvin, Martin Luther, John Knox, and Theodore Beza, among others, is due to their doctrinal position of the absolute sovereignty of God and the utter depravity of mankind. The notes are also very concise, explaining the meaning of Scripture and free of pedantic material.
    Sample notes from the 1599 GENEVA BIBLE, the Tolle Lege Press restored edition of 2007:
  • Genesis 1:11 "So that we see it is the only power of God's word that maketh the earth fruitful, which else naturally is barren.
  • Genesis 1:12 "This sentence is so oft repeated, to signify that God made all his creatures to serve to his glory, and to the profit of man: but for sin they were accursed, yet to the elect, by Christ they are restored, and serve to their wealth.
  • Genesis 2:16 "So that man might know there was a sovereign Lord, to whom he owed obedience.
  • Genesis 2:17 "By this death he meaneth the separation of man from God, who is our life and chief felicity: and also that our disobedience is the cause thereof.
  • Genesis 3:4 "This is Satan's chiefest subtlety, to cause us not to fear God's threatenings.
  • Genesis 4:5 "Because he was an hypocrite, and offered only for an outward show without sincerity of heart.
  • Genesis 9:6 "Not only by the magistrate, but oft times God raiseth up one murderer to kill another.
    Therefore to kill man is to deface God's image, and so injury is not only done to man, but also to God.
  • Psalm 37:1,7,11 "1 This Psalm containeth exhortation and consolation for the weak, that are grieved at the prosperity of the wicked, and the affliction of the godly. 7 For how prosperously soever the wicked do live for the time, he doth affirm their felicity to be vain and transitory, because they are not in the favor of God, but in the end they are destroyed as his enemies. 11 And how miserably that the righteous seemeth to live in the world, yet his end is peace, and he is in the favor of God, he is delivered from the wicked, and preserved.
  • Psalm 37:5 "Be not led by thine own wisdom, but obey God, and he will finish his work in thee.
  • Psalm 37:6 "As the hope of the daylight causeth us not to be offended with the darkness of the night: so ought we patiently to trust that God will clear our cause and restore us to our right.
  • Psalm 37:8 "Meaning, except he moderate his affections, he shall be led to do as they do.
  • Psalm 37:12 "The godly are assured that the power and craft of the wicked shall not prevail against them, but fall on their own necks, and therefore ought patiently to abide God's time, and in the meanwhile bewail their sins, and offer up their tears, is a sacrifice of their obedience.
  • Psalm 37:16 "For they are daily fed as with Manna from heaven, and have sufficient, when the wicked have never enough, but ever hunger.
  • Psalm 37:25 "Though the just man die, yet God's blessings are extended to his posterity, and though God suffer some just man to lack temporal benefits, yet he recompenseth him with spiritual treasures.
  • Psalm 37:29 "They shall continually be preserved under God's wings, and have at least inward rest.
  • Psalm 37:30 "These three points are required of the faithful, that their talk be godly, that God's law be in their heart, and that their life be upright.
  • Psalm 37:37 "He exhorteth the faithful to mark diligently the examples both of God's mercies, and also of his judgments.
  • Psalm 37:39 "He showeth that the patient hope of the godly is never in vain, but in the end hath good success, though for a time God prove them by sundry tentations.
  • John 1:1 "The Son of God is of one, and the selfsame eternity or everlastingness, and of one and the selfsame essence or nature, with the Father.
    "From his beginning, as the Evangelist saith, 1 John 1:1, as though he said, that the world began not then to have his being, when God began to make all that was made: for the word was even then when all things that were made, began to be made, and therefore he was before the beginning of all things.
    "Had his being.
    "This word, That, pointeth out unto us a peculiar and choice thing above all other, and putteth a difference between this Word, which is the Son of God, and the Laws of God, which otherwise also are called the word of God.
    "This word (With) putteth out the distinction of persons to us.
    "This word (Word) is the first in order in the sentence, and is that which the learned call (Subjectum) and this word (God) is the latter in order, and the same which the learned call (Predicatum.)
  • John 1:3 "The son of God declareth that same his everlasting Godhead, both by the creating of all things, and also by the preserving of them, and especially by the excellent gifts of reason and understanding, wherewith he that beautified man above all other creatures.
    "Paul expoundeth this place, Col. 1:15 and 16 [Colossians 1:15,16].
    "That is, as the Father did work, so did the Son work with him: for he was fellow worker with him.
    "Of all those things which were made, nothing was made without him.
  • Jude 1:24 "He commendeth them to the grace of God, declaring sufficiently that it is God only that can give us that constancy which he requireth of us.
  • Hebrews 13:8b "all precepts of manners, and that is this: That we ought to quiet and content ourselves in Christ only: for there was yet never any man saved without the knowledge of him, neither is at this day saved, neither shall be saved hereafter.
  • Revelation 4:9 "God is said to have glory, honor, kingdom, and such like given unto him, when we godly and reverently set forth that which is properly and only his." -- excerpts from 1599 Geneva Bible, Tolle Lege Press, 2006, 2007)
  • 1599 Geneva Bible, Tolle Lege Press Restoration, Fourth Printing, 2008, Probable Errata Listing (June 30, 2014, revised August 15, 2014, revised September 4, 2015)
    http://www.lettermen2.com/1599errata.html
    A Resolution That Tolle Lege Press and White Hall Press of Chicago Complete the Limited Modernization of the 1599 GENEVA BIBLE Begun in 2004 and of all Spin-off Publications (August 15, 2014, revised September 7, 2015)
    http://www.lettermen2.com/1599resolve.html
    The 1599 Geneva Bible, Tolle Lege edition, online
    http://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=matthew%201&version=GNV
    There is confusion in certain library records for the 1599 and 1672 Bibles that will only be resolved by physical inspection. The following is thought to be an alternative record for the 1599 GENEVA BIBLE.
    *Beze, Theodore de, Joachim Camerarius, Pierre Loyseleur, Laurence Tomson, and Franciscus Junius, The Bible, That is, The Holy Scriptures Conteined in the Old and New Testament. "Publisher: [Amsterdam?]: [publisher not identified], [approximately 1599]."
    1599 Geneva Bible Notes
    http://www.reformedreader.org/gbn/en.htm

    Miller, Perry (editor), and Thomas H. Johnson (editor), The Puritans: A Sourcebook of Their Writings, two volumes in one, ISBN: 0486416011 9780486416014.
    "Critically acclaimed classic lets Puritans speak for themselves in crucial documents covering history, theory of state and society, religion, customs, behavior, biographies and letters, poetry, literary theory, education, science, and more. Regarded by historian Samuel Eliot Morison as 'the best selection ever made of Puritan literature, point of view and culture'."
    "This thematic consideration of primary source material covers the major epochs of early American Puritanism. It includes the Puritan's views on the state and society, this world and the next, poetry, education, and so on. First published in 1938." -- Cyril J. Barber

    Solt, Leo F., Saints in Arms: Puritanism and Democracy in Cromwell's Army.

    Symonds, Richard, Diary of the Marches of the Royal Army During the Great Civil War.

    See also: The sovereign grace of god: his everlasting mercy and lovingkindness, The doctrine of man (human nature, total depravity), Selection of covenant heads for positions of leadership, Puritanism: works by and about puritans, Puritan paperback series from banner of truth, Corporate faithfulness and sanctification, The covenanted reformation of scotland author/title listing, Background, foundation, and history of the covenanted reformation of scotland, The application of scripture to the corporate bodies of church and state, Reformation eschatology, Sexual relationship, and so forth, and so on.

    Related WebLinks

    Puritanism
    The Puritan Theological and Cultural Heritage
    Dr. C. Gregg Singer, Puritan Heritage, 47 min.
    http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?SID=9220394856

    The Puritan Political Heritage
    Dr. C. Gregg Singer, Puritan Heritage, 47 min.
    http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?SID=922039503

    The Departure From the Puritan Heritage
    Dr. C. Gregg Singer, Puritan Heritage, 52 min.
    http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?SID=92903104657



    Sermons Preached Before Governing Bodies

    See Isaiah 40:1 -- Isaiah 55:13 and annotations in The Reformation Study Bible.

    And I will make thee unto this people a fenced brasen wall: and they shall fight against thee, but they shall not prevail against thee: for I am with thee to save thee and to deliver thee, saith the LORD.
    And I will deliver thee out of the hand of the wicked, and I will redeem thee out of the hand of the terrible.
    (Jeremiah 15:20, 21)

    Arrowsmith, John, The Covenant Avenging Sword Brandished . . . Matt. 10:34 [Matthew 10:34], (1643). Alternate title: THE COVENANT-AVENGING SWORD BANISHED, 1643. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
    "This famous sermon (of 32 pages), on Leviticus 26:25, I shall bring a sword upon you, that shall avenge the quarrel of my covenant, (by one of the more prominent men that was shortly thereafter called to the Westminster Assembly), was preached 'Before the Honorable (English -- RB), House of Commons, At Their Late Solemn Fast, January 25 (1643).' It demonstrates that it is the Scriptural duty of nations and their rulers to covenant with Christ and to seek God's glory in all things -- which is especially important in the case of civil leaders in their office as civil leaders. For, as Arrowsmith shows, if this is not done (with godly zeal), God's wrath (in the form of blindness to the truth, in a lack of fear of the judgment that is to come, in storms and wars and other calamities, etc.), will be poured out upon those nations which refuse to kiss the Son by obeying and covenanting with Him.
    " Be wise now therefore, O ye kings: be instructed, ye judges of the earth. Serve the LORD with fear, and rejoice with trembling. Kiss the Son, lest he be angry, and ye perish from the way, when his wrath is kindled but a little. Blessed are all they that put their trust in him. (Ps. 2:10-12 [Psalm 2:10-12]).
    "In this sermon Arrowsmith also summons the English parliament to new obedience to Christ. Some suggest that Arrowsmith may have been the main shaper of the Shorter Catechism. 'Cotton Mather says . . . "everything of Arrowsmith is admirable . . ." He was clearly respected as both a preacher and a scholar by the (Westminster -- RB), Assembly, which he repeatedly summoned to unity and diligence in its work'." (Barker, Puritan Profiles, p. 148) -- Publisher

    Arrowsmith, John, England's Ebenezer; or, Stone of Help. Set up in Thankfull Acknowledgment of the Lord's Having Helped us Hitherto . . . In a Sermon Preached to Both . . . Houses of Parliament . . . 1 Sam. vii. 12 [1 Samuel 7:12], March 12, 1645.

    Ashe, Simeon (d. 1662), The Best Refuge for the Most Oppressed, in a Sermon Preached From the Text, Ps. 9:9 [Psalm 9:9], to the Honorable House of Commons at Their Solemn Fast, March 30, 1642. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.

    *Ashe, Simeon (d. 1662), The Church Sinking, Saved by Christ: Set out in a Sermon Preached Before the Right Honourable the House of Lords, in the Abby-Church at Westminster, on Wednesday, Febr. 26. 1644, Being the day of the Monthly Publike Fast. [Isaiah 63:5] Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.

    *Ashe, Simeon (d. 1662), Religious Covenanting Directed, and Covenant-keeping Perswaded: Presented, in a Sermon Preached Before the Right Honourable Thomas Adams Lord Major, and the Right Worshipfull the Sheriffs, and Aldermen his Brethren, and the Rest of the Common-Councel of the Famous City of London, January 14. 1645. Upon Which day the Solemne League and Covenant was Renewed by Them and Their Officers, With Prayer and Fasting, at Michael Basing-shaw, London, 1645.

    Ashe (Ash), Simeon (d. 1662), Self-surrender Unto God: Opened and Applyed, in a Sermon Preached Before the Honourable House of Commons, at Margarets, Westminster, at Their Late Solemn Fast, February 23. 1647. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.

    Baillie, Robert (1599-1662), Errours and Induration are the Great Sins and the Great Judgements of the Time. Alternate title: ERROURS AND INDURATION ARE THE GREAT SINS AND THE GREAT JUDGEMENTS OF THE TIME: PREACHED IN A SERMON BEFORE THE RIGHT HONOURABLE HOUSE OF PEERS, IN THE ABBEY-CHURCH AT WESTMINSTER, JULY 30, 1645, THE DAY OF THE MONTHLY FAST. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Puritan Bookshelf CD #15.

    Baillie, Robert (1599-1662), Satan the Leader in Chief to all who Resist the Reparation of Sion. As it was cleared in a sermon to the Honourable House of Commons at their late solemn fast, Febr. 28. 1643. By Robert Baylie, minister at Glasgow. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #23.

    Barker, Matthew, A Christian Standing and Moving Upon the True Foundation . . . Isa. 30:7 [Isaiah 30:7]; Cant. 3:6 [Song of Solomon 3:6], 1648.
    Full title: A Christian standing and moving upon the true foundation, or, A word in season: perswading to sticke close to God, act eminently for God, in his present design against all discouragements, oppositions, temptations: expressed in a sermon preached before the honourable House of Commons upon the day of their monthly fast, Octob. 25, 1648.

    Baxter, Richard (1615-1691), The Life of Faith; As it is the Evidence of Things Unseen. A Sermon Preach'd (contractedly) Before the King at White-Hall, Upon July the 22d, 1660. By Richard Baxter, . . . With enlargement, and relaxation of the stile for common use, 1706, ISBN: 1877611360.

    *Baxter, Richard (1615-1691), The one Thing Necessary, ISBN: 1877611360. Available in THE REFORMED PASTOR.
    A treatise on the sin of Martha.

    Bond, John, Eshcol, or Grapes (among) thorns. As they were delivered in a thanksgiving sermon, to the honourable House of commons . . . 1648
    Eshcol, Or Grapes (among) Thorns, John Bond
    http://books.google.com/books?id=ena1HwAACAAJ&ie=ISO-8859-1&output=html

    Bowles, Oliver (ca. 1577-1646?), Zeale for God's House Quickened, or, A Sermon Preached Before the Assembly of Lords, Commons and Divines at Their Solemn Fast Iuly 7, 1643, John ii. 17: Gal. 4:18. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.

    Bridge, William (1600?-1670), Joabs Counsel, and King Davids Seasonable Hearing it: Delivered in a Sermon Before the Honourable House of Commons at Their Late Solemne Fast, Feb. 22, 1643. [2 Samuel 19:5-8]

    *Burges (or Burgess), Cornelius (1589?-1665), The First Sermon Preached to the Honorable House of Commons now Assembled in Parliament at Their Public Fast, Nov. 17, 1640. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #29.
    "A beautifully clear facsimile copy of this amazing sermon (published by order of the British House of Commons in 1641), exhorting this Parliament to 'stand to the covenant' of God; by, 'endeavouring of a further Sanction of, and stronger Guard about our true Palladium, the true Religion, already established among us; in the perfecting of the Reformation of it; in the erecting, maintaining, protecting, and encouraging of an able, godly, faithful, zealous, profitable, Preaching Ministry, in every Parish Church and Chapel throughout England and Wales; in interceding to the Kings sacred Majesty for the setting up of a Faithful, Judicious, and Zealous Magistracy, where yet the same is wanting, to be ever at hand to back such a Ministry: without either of which, not only the power of Godliness will sooner degenerate into formality, and zeal into lukewarmness; but Popery, Arminianism, Socinianism, Profaneness, Apostasy, and Atheism itself will more and more crowd in upon us, and prevail against us, do You all You can be all other means.' Points out that where a godly ministry and magistracy are lacking, society degenerates into a godless mob, headed by one of the above named heresies -- as we have seen in our day. Presses national covenant renewal, from Jer. 50:5 [Jeremiah 50:5], and explains from scripture how and why this should take place. Cites many biblical examples of the great Scriptural blessing that has followed previous national covenanting; while making practical application to the situation of the day. This sermon foreshadows chapter 23, of the celebrated Westminster Confession of Faith [1646], on 'the Civil Magistrate,' and gives much insight into this watershed period of Christian political development. It is highly recommended for anyone even remotely interested in seeing their nation prosper politically and ecclesiastically. Furthermore, it will be a great help for anyone seeking to formulate a biblical doctrine explaining the four way relationship between: loving God with all your heart, soul, strength and mind; Jesus Christ as mediator; the everlasting covenant (and covenanting); and the state, as set forth in Scripture. A very rare item. A Covenanter's delight! 70 pages." -- Publisher

    Burges (or Burgess), Cornelius (1589?-1665), A Sermon Preach From Jer. 1:5 [Jeremiah 1:5], to Parliament, Nov., 17th, 1640. Available in SERMONS BEFORE PARLIAMENT, NOV. 17, 1640 -- JUNE 30, 1647.

    *Burgess, Anthony (d. 1664?), The Difficulty of, and the Encouragements to a Reformation: A Sermon Preached Before the Honourable House of Commons at the Publick Fast, Septem. 27, 1643, Mark i. 2-3, 1643. [Mark 1:2,3]. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
    "Deals with the centrality of Scripture in Reformation and 'that it is a special duty upon all, to remove all impediments, and to make way for Christ when he is coming to us.' 'Dr. Wilkins,' writes Thomas Smith (of Burgess), 'enrolls him among the most eminent of the English divines for sermons and practical divinity . . . Dr. Cotton Mather says . . . 'Of A. Burgess, I may say, he has wrote for thee excellent things'." (Select Memoirs . . . of Pious and Learned English and Scottish Divines, p. 471) -- Publisher

    *Burgess, Anthony (d. 1664?), Publick Affections Pressed in a Sermon Before the Honourable House of Commons Assembled in Parliament: Upon the Solemn day of Humiliation, Febr. 25. 1645, Numb. 11:12. [Numbers 11:12]. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.

    *Burgess, Anthony (d. 1664?), The Reformation of the Church, To be Endeavoured More Than That of the Commonwealth, 1645, 28 pages. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
    "A 'Sermon preached before the Right Honourable House of Lords at the publicke Fast, August 27, 1645,' (notes the cover), during the days of the sitting of the Westminster Assembly. Can you image these words (which are just a small sample from the preface to the godly exhortation contained in this sermon), directed, by request of the civil magistrate, to the leaders of your nation? Burgess writes, 'It was my endeavour in this Sermon to excite your Lordships to a speedy and exact Reformation of the Church from all the corruptions that have defiled her, and herein to attend unto God's Word, as the only starre that will conduct unto Christ. None are too great to undertake so good a work. Gregory said of David dancing before the Ark, Magis miror Davidum saltantem, quam pugnantem, David is to be more admired in his religious worship of God, than in his courageous conquest and slaughter of the Philistines, or other enemies. Hence, Jer. 9:23,24 [Jeremiah 9:23,24], where glory in wisdome, riches and might is forbidden, there is a kinde of an holy pride allowed in the knowledge of the Lord. Let Heathens glory, that they are saluted by the Common-wealth, Patres Pariae; but let those Christians, whom God honoureth with dignity and place, delight to be nursing Fathers to the Church, by speaking comfortably unto those who teach the good knowledge of God; and by commanding the Levites to carry all the filthiness out of the Temple. Which that your Lordships may faithfully and zealously doe, is the prayer of Your Lordships humble Servant, Anthony Burgesse'." -- Publisher

    *Burgess, Anthony (d. 1664?), Rome's Cruelty and Apostasy: Declared in a Sermon Preached on the Fifth of November, 1644, Before the Honourable House of Commons. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.

    Calamy, Edmund (1600-1666), England's Antidote Against the Plague of Civil War: Presented in a Sermon Before the Honorable House of Commons, on Their Late Extraordinary Solemne Fast, October 22. 1644, Luke 13:4,5.

    Calamy, Edmund (1600-1666), The Great Danger of Covenant-refusing, and Covenant-breaking. Alternate title: THE GREAT DANGER OF COVENANT-REFUSING, AND COVENANT-BREAKING: PRESENTED IN A SERMON PREACHED BEFORE THE RIGHT HONORABLE THOMAS ADAMS, LORD MAYOR, AND THE RIGHT WORSHIPFULL THE SHERIFFES, AND THE ALDERMEN HIS BRETHREN, AND THE REST OF THE COMMON-COUNCELL OF THE FAMOUS CITY OF LONDON, JAN. 14, 1645. UPON WHICH DAY THE SOLEMNE LEAGUE AND COVENANT WAS RENUED BY THEM. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
    Vow, and pay unto the Lord your God. (Psalm 76:11a)
    When thou vowest a vow unto God, defer not to pay it: for he hath no pleasure in fools; pay that which thou hast vowed.
    Better it is that thou shouldest not vow, than that thou shouldest vow and not pay.
    (Ecclesiastes 5:4,5)
    http://www.truecovenanter.com/covenants/calamy_sermon_danger_of_covenant_refusing_and_breaking.html

    Calamy, Edmund (1600-1666), An Indictment Against England Becavse of her Selfe-mvrdering Divisions: Together With an Exhortation to an England-preserving Unity and Concord: Presented in a sermon preached before the . . . House of Lords in the abby Church at Westminster, at the late solemne fast, Matt. 12:25 [Matthew 12:25], December 25. 1644. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.

    Calamy, Edmund (1671-1732), The Ministry of the Dissenters Vindicated: in an Ordination Sermon Preach'd at Ailsbury, in the County of Bucks; on June 11. 1724.

    *Calvin, John (1509-1564), The Institutes of the Christian Religion, 2 volumes, ISBN: 0664220207 0664220215. Considered to be among the ten greatest books in the English language. A Christian classic.
    "Edited by John McNeill and translated by Ford Lewis Battles, this is the definitive English language edition of one of the monumental works of the Christian church -- Calvin's INSTITUTES.
    "Still considered by many to be the finest explanation and defense of the Protestant Reformation available.
    "The work is divided into four books: I. The Knowledge of God the Creator, II. The Knowledge of God the Redeemer in Christ, III. The Mode of Obtaining the Grace of Christ, IV. The External Means or Helps by Which God Allures Us Into Fellowship With Christ and Keeps Us in It. . . . THE INSTITUTES is praised by the secular philosopher, Will Durant, as one of the ten books that shook the world." -- GCB
    Calvin spent a lifetime writing and perfecting INSTITUTES OF CHRISTIAN RELIGION. His Prefatory Address makes it clear that he intended the work to be a defense of Christianity to the King of France.
    Therefore, plainly stated, one of the most influential works ever published in the English language is a defense of Christianity to leaders of State.
    Prefatory Address to His Most Christian Majesty, The Most Mighty and Illustrious Monarch, Francis, King of the French, His Sovereign, John Calvin. Available in THE INSTITUTES OF THE CHRISTIAN RELIGION.
    "Indeed, this consideration makes a true king: to recognize himself a minister of God in governing his kingdom. Now, that king, who in ruling over his realm does not serve God's glory, exercises not kingly rule but brigandage. [Footnote: 'Nec iam regnum ille sed latrocinium exercet.' An echo of Augustine's famous phrase: 'When justice is taken away, what are kingdoms [[regna]] but a vast banditry [[magna latocinia]]?' City of God, IV. iv (MPL [[Migne, J.P., Patrologiae cursus completus, series Latina]], 41. 115; tr. NPNF [[A Select Library of the Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers, second series]], II. 66)]. Furthermore, he is deceived who looks for enduring prosperity in his kingdom when it is not ruled by God's scepter, that is, his Holy Word; for the heavenly oracle that proclaims that where prophecy fails the people are scattered [Prov. 29:18 (Proverbs 29:18)], cannot lie." (Battles translation)
    "The characteristic of a true sovereign is, to acknowledge that, in the administration of his kingdom, he is a minister of God. He who does not make his reign subservient to the divine glory, acts the part not of a king, but a robber. He, moreover, deceives himself who anticipates long prosperity to any kingdom which is not ruled by the sceptre of God, that is, by his divine word. For the heavenly oracle is infallible which has declared, that where there is no vision the people perish (Proverbs 29:18), (Beveridge translation)."
    See the entire Prefatory Address, Beveridge translation. Considered to be one of the greatest prefaces ever written.
    http://www.ccel.org/ccel/calvin/institutes.ii.viii.html
    "The doctrines of covenant liberty were rediscovered in the Reformation. John Calvin went further than anyone else in defining liberty and what Christians need to do to maintain it. Includes bibliographies."
    It is recommended that INSTITUTES OF CHRISTIAN RELIGION be used for daily devotions and may be used in combination with Ford Lewis Battles and John Walchenbach, AN ANALYSIS OF THE INSTITUTES OF THE CHRISTIAN RELIGION OF JOHN CALVIN and with CALVIN'S COMMENTARIES.
    Calvin's Commentaries at BibleStudyGuide.org
    http://www.biblestudyguide.org/comment/calvin/comm_index.htm
    Calvin's Commentaries, complete
    From the Calvin Translation Society edition.
    http://www.ccel.org/ccel/calvin/commentaries.i.html
    One Hundred Aphorisms, Containing, Within a Narrow Compass, the Substance and Order of the Four Books of THE INSTITUTES OF THE CHRISTIAN RELIGION
    http://www.lettermen2.com/pringle.html
    Calvin, Jean (1509-1564), Institutes of the Christian Religion; A New Translation by Henry Beveridge (1845), Volume: 1
    http://archive.org/details/instituteschrist01calvuoft
    Calvin, Jean (1509-1564), Institutes of the Christian Religion; A New Translation by Henry Beveridge (1845), Volume: 2
    http://archive.org/details/institutesofreli02calvuoft
    Calvin, Jean (1509-1564), Institutes of the Christian Religion, Beveridge translation
    http://www.ccel.org/ccel/calvin/institutes.iii.vii.html
    Monergism: Commentaries
    From Mongergism.com search "commentaries."
    http://www.monergism.com

    Caryl, Joseph (1602-1673), David's Prayer for Solomon: Containing the Proper Endowments and Duty Royall of a King, With the Consequent Blessings Upon a Kingdome: Delivered in a Sermon at Christ-Church London, before the Right Honourable the Lord Major, the . . . aldermen his brethren, together with the . . . companies of the said city, upon the 27th of March, 1643. Being the commemoration of His Majesties inauguration. A sermon.

    Caryl, Joseph (1602-1673), Heaven and Earth Embracing; or, God and Man Approaching: Shewed in a Sermon Preached Before the . . . House of Commons . . . January 28, 1645 . . . Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.

    Caryl, Joseph (1602-1673), The Nature, Solemnity, Grounds, Property, and Benefits of a Sacred Covenant: Together With the Duties of Those who Enter Into Such a Covenant: Delivered in a Sermon at westminster at the Publique Convention, Ordered by the Honourable House of Commons, for the Taking of the Covenant, by all such, of all degrees as willingly presented themselves, upon Friday Oct.b. 6, 1643. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.
    A sermon on the Solemn League and Covenant, Nehemiah IX, 38. [Nehemiah 9:38]
    Caryl, Joseph (1602-1673), Joseph Caryl on Covenanting
    http://www.truecovenanter.com/covenants/slc_caryl_westminster.html

    Caryl, Joseph (1602-1673), and Ferdinando Fairfax (1584-1648), The Saint's Thankfull Acclamation at Christ's Resumption of his Great Power and the Initials of his Kingdome. Delivered in a Sermon . . . thanksgiving . . . for the . . . victory given our armie, under the command of . . . Lord Fairfax, at Selby . . . and the other . . . forces in Pembrockshire, April 23d, 1644 . . . Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.

    Caryl, Joseph (1602-1673), George Miller, and Giles Calvert, The Arraignment of Unbelief, as the Grand Cause of our Nationall Non-establishment: Cleared in a Sermon to the Honourable House of Commons in Parliament, at Margarets Westminster, Upon the 28th. of May, 1645. Being the day of Their Publike Fast. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.

    Case, Thomas (1598-1682), Spiritual Whoredom, Discovered in a Sermon Preached Before the Honorable House of Commons Assembled in Parliament Upon a Solemn day of Humiliation, May 26, 1647. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.

    Cawdrey, Daniel (1588-1664), Church Reformation Promoted, in a Sermon on Matt 18:15-17 [Matthew 18:15-17], Preached at Northampton on the day of Humiliation Before the Association of Ministers. As also 1. Some animadversions upon Mr. Humphrey's Second Vindication for promiscuous admission to the sacrament. 2. Some animadversions upon Mr. Sanders his Antidiatribe, tending to the same end of Church-Reformation, 1657.

    Cawdrey, Daniel (1588-1664), The Good man a Publick Good, 1. Passively, 2. Actively. As it was Manifested in a Sermon Preached to the Honourable House of Commons, at the Late Solemne Fast: January 31. 1643. By Daniel Cavvdrey, Minister of the Gospell at Great Billing in Northhamptonshire, and one of the Assembly of Divines. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.

    Cawdrey, Daniel (1588-1664), A Late Great Shipwrack of Faith: Occasioned by a Fearful Wrack of Conscience Discovered in a Sermon Preached at Pauls the First day of July, 1655.

    Chambers, Humphrey, and Samuel Man, A Divine Ballance to Weigh Religious Fasts in: Applyed to Present vse, in a Sermon Preached Before the Honourable House of Commons, in S. Margarets Westminster at their Publique Fast, Sept. 27. 1643, James 3:18.

    Cotton, John (1584-1652), Wisdom, knowledge, and the fear of God recommended to rulers and people. A sermon preach'd in the audience of His Honour Spencer Phips, Esq; lieutenant-governour and commander in chief, the Honourable His Majesty's Council, and House of Representatives, of the province of the Massachusetts-Bay, in New-England. May 30th. 1753. Being the day for the election of His Majesty's Council for the province. By John Cotton, A.M. Pastor of the Church in Newtown. Boston: N.E., 1753.

    Edwards, Thomas, Reasons Against the Independent Government of Particular Congregations: As Also Against the Toleration of Such Churches to be Erected in This Kingdom -- Together With an Answer to Such Reasons as are Commonly Alleged for Such a Toleration, 1641. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #24, #26.

    Eells, Edward, Christ, the Foundation of the Salvation of Sinners, and of Civil and Ecclesiastical Government: Illustrated in a Sermon, preached before the General Assembly of the colony of Connecticut, on the day of the anniversary election, May 14th, 1767.

    *Gillespie, George (1613-1648), Ezekiel's Vision of Millennial Glory, Preparation for Coming Reformation and a Remedy for Backsliding and Lukewarmness. Available (THE PURITAN FAST SERMONS, 1640-1652, THE WORKS OF GEORGE GILLESPIE, and as two MP3 files), on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available (two MP3 files), on Reformation Bookshelf CD #18.
    "This sermon was originally preached to England's House of Commons 'At Their Late Solemn Fast, Wednesday, March 27, 1644.' It is taken from volume one of Gillespie's two volume WORKS. It gives great insight into the covenanted unity, uniformity and worldwide Reformation sought by the majority of the Westminster Divines and the best of the civil leaders of Gillespie's day. Gillespie searchingly deals with the individual, the church and the state, while painting a Scriptural picture of prophesied earthly victory (Isa. 2:2-5 [Isaiah 2:2-5], Ezek. 47:1-12 [Ezekiel 47:1-12], etc.) -- in classic historicist postmillennial style -- which is sure to stir even the coldest Christian heart. He shows how the worst disease the land can suffer is corruption in religion (particularly as exhibited in false worship), rebukes those opposing the Solemn League and Covenant and calls upon all to maintain (and even improve upon), the Reformation attainments whereunto we have already attained. (Phil. 3:16 [Philippians 3:16]). It is also interesting to note, especially since this sermon was preached before civil rulers, that though Gillespie points out the need for humility, repentance, prayer, tears, godly affections, sanctified minds and honorable actions, he does not forget to mention the importance of a covenanted army in this great cause of Christ's Covenanted Reformation. Also noted is the destruction of Antichrist, the calling and conversion of the Jews (Rom. 11 [Romans 11]), the two witnesses and the 1260 year apostasy. Gillespie closes with an appeal to the English House of Commons, with whom the Scots had 'joined in covenant and in arms,' to be faithful 'according to the word he (God -- RB), hath covenanted with you (i.e. in the Solemn League and Covenant -- RB), so his spirit remaineth among you' -- exhorting these magistrates to fear not but to be strong in the Lord, and in the power of his might. This is classic Covenanter preaching, among the best sermons you may ever hear!" -- Publisher

    *Gillespie, George (1613-1648), Reformation's Refining Fire; or, Iconoclastic Zeal Necessary to World Reformation by George Gillespie, audio file. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Also found in volume one of GILLESPIE'S WORKS.
    "This sermon, read by elder Lyndon Dohms, was originally preached to the House of Lords in the abbey church at Westminster during the days of the Westminster Assembly (on August 27, 1645). It deals with Malachi 3:2 and can also be found in volume one of GILLESPIE'S WORKS. The reading is approximately 80 minutes in length and for content this is likely the best sermon that we have ever carried. The glory of Christ is magnified in a soul stirring manner and at a level which is seldom (if ever), reached in our day. Though preaching before some of the most powerful men of his day, Gillespie does nothing to shave off the sharp edges of the whole counsel of God. He makes it abundantly clear that spiritual Reformation (individual, ecclesiastical and civil), is like a flaming fire which burns the dross of the flesh and is often hated and opposed by those that cry loudest for 'Reform.' On the other hand, the refining fire of Reformation which pleases God (and comes from His fatherly hands, filled with mercy, love and grace), not only turns his wrath from the nations (by granting the grace to remove the causes of His wrath), but invigorates the spirit with that iconoclastic zeal against sin (whether personal or corporate), that can only be produced by His sovereign power. Whole-hearted (covenanted) reformation is contrasted, throughout this sermon, with the half-hearted comfortable Christianity that has been common in most ages. Gillespie wields the sword of Scripture as few can in driving home a multitude of vitally important points. This sermon can be listened to over and over with increasing profit, as it contains a fullness which is almost impossible to absorb in just one sitting. Don't miss this one; it is a real gem!" -- Publisher

    Goode, William (b. 1599 or 1600), The Discoverie of a Publique Spirit: Presented in a Sermon Before the Honourable House of Commons at Margarets Westminster, at their publique fast, March 26. 1645. By William Goode B.D. pastor of Denton in Norfolk, on of the Assembly of Divines (London: Printed by I.L. for Christopher Meredith, at the sign of the Crane in Pauls Church-yard, 1645). Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.

    Gouge, William, The Saint's Support, set out in a Sermon Preached Before the Honourable House of Commons Assembled in Parliament. At a publick fast, 29. Iune, 1642, Nehemiah V, 19. Running title reads: A SERMON PREACHED AT THE LATE FAST BEFORE THE COMMONS HOUSE OF PARLIAMENT. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #29.

    Greene, John, The Churches Duty, for Received Mercies. Discovered in a Sermon Preached Before the Honourable House of Commons: at Margarets Westminster, Feb. 24. 1646. being the day of the solemne monthly fast. By John Greene Minister of Gods Word, and a member of the Assembly of Divines . . . Deut. 4:7,10,12 [Deuteronomy 4:7,12,12]. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.

    Greene, John, Nehemiah's Teares and Prayers for Judah's Affliction, and the Ruines and Repaire of Jerusalem. Delivered in a Sermon in the Church of Magarets Westminster, before the Honourable House of Commons upon the day of their monethly humiliation, April 24. 1644. By John Greene Master of Arts, late pastour of Pencomb in the countie of Hereford.

    Greenhill, William (1591-1671), The axe at the Root, a Sermon Preached Before the Honourable House of Commons, at Their Publike Fast, April 26. 1643. By William Greenhill. . . Matt. 3:10 [Matthew 3:10].

    Henderson, Alexander (1583?-1646), and Philip Nye (1596?-1672), The Covenant: With a Narrative of the Proceedings and Solemn Manner of Taking it by the Honourable House of Commons, and reverent Assembly of Divines the 25th day of September, at Saint Margarets in Westminster. Also, tvvo speeches delivered at the same time; the one by Mr. Philip Nye, the other by Mr. Alexander Hendersam. Published by speciall order of the House, 1643

    Henderson, Alexander (1583?-1646), A Sermon Preached to the Honourable House of Commons, at Their Late Solemne Fast, Wednesday, December 27. 1643. By Alexander Henderson, minister at Edinburgh. Published by order of the House, 1644.

    Henderson, Alexander (1583?-1646), A Sermon Preached Before the Right Honorable the Lords and Commons Assembled in Parliament: at Margarets Church in Westminster, upon Thursday the 18. day of Iuly, 1644. It being the day of public thanksgiving for the great mercie of God in the happie successe of the forces of both kingdomes neer York, against the enemies of King and Parliament. By Alexander Henderson Minister at Edinburgh. Published by order of both houses, 1644.
    Notes: "A catalogue of the names of those divines, who have preached before the parliament . . . Jan. 18, 1644 to July 18, 1644" -- Recto of 6th p. Reproduction of original in Thomason Collection, British Library.

    Henderson, Alexander (1583?-1646), A Sermon Preached Before the Right Honourable House of Lords, in the Abbey-Church at Westminster, Wednesday the 28. of May 1645. Being the day appointed for solemne and publick humiliation. By Alexander Henderson, minister at Edenburgh, 1645.

    Herle, Charles (1598-1659), Abraham's Offer God's Offering: in a Sermon Preached Before the Right Honorable the Lord Mayor, Together With the Aldermen his Brethren: at Christ-church on Easter-Tuesday last, being the day of their publique thanksgiving.

    Herle, Charles (1598-1659), Davids Song of Three Parts: Delivered in a Sermon preached before the right Honorable the House of Lords, at the Abby-Church in Westminster, upon the 15. day of June, 1643. Being the day appointed for publike thanksgiving for Gods great deliverance of the Parliament, citie and kingdome, from the late most mischievous conspiracy against all three, Isaiah 33:11.

    Herle, Charles (1598-1659), A Pair of Compasses for Church and State: Delivered in a Sermon Preached at St. Margarets in Westminster Before the Honorable House of Commons, at Their monethly Fast November the Last, 1642. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.

    Howard, Simeon, A Sermon Preached Before the Honorable Council, and the Honorable House of Representatives of the State of Massachusetts-Bay, in New-England, May 31, 1780. Being the anniversary for the election of the Honorable Council. By Simeon Howard, A.M. Pastor of the West Church in Boston. N.B. Several passages omitted in preaching are now inserted in the publication of this discourse. Boston, New-England, MDCCLXXX. [1780].

    London Ministers, James Nichols (editor), Puritan Sermons 1659-1689: Being the Morning Exercises at Cripplegate, St. Giles in the Fields, and in Southwark by Seventy-Five Ministers of the Gospel in or Near London with Notes and Translations by James Nichols (six volumes). Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.

    Manton, Thomas (1620-1677), Englands Spirituall Languishing; With the Causes and Cure: Discovered in a Sermon Preached Before the Honorable House of Commons, on their solemn day of fast, at Margarets Westminster, June 28. 1648. By Thomas Manton, minister of Stoke-Newington, 1648.

    Manton, Thomas (1620-1677), Meate out of the Eater, or, Hopes of Unity in and by Divided and Distracted Times. Discovered in a Sermon Preached Before the Honourable house of Commons at Margarets Westminster on their solemne day of fast, June 30. 1647. By Tho: Manton Minister of Stoke-Newington, 1647.

    Marshall, Stephen (1594?-1655), Emmanuel: A Thanksgiving Sermon Preached to the Honourable House of Commons upon their solemn day of praising God for the victory obtained by the Parliaments forces in Southvvales. In the church of Margarets Westminster, May 17. 1648. By Stephen Marshall B.D. minister of Gods Word at Finchingfield in Essex. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.

    Marshall, Stephen (1594?-1655), A Divine Project to Save a Kingdome: Opened in a Sermon to the Right Honorable the Lord Maior and court of aldermen, of the citie of London, at their anniversary meeting on Easter Munday, Apr. 22. 1644. at Christ-Church. By Stephen Marshall, B.D. Minister of Gods word at Finchingfield in Essex, 1644.

    Marshall, Stephen (1594?-1655), and Giles Firmin (1614-1697), The Power of the Civil Magistrate in Matters of Religion Vindicated: The Extent of his Power Determined in a Sermon Preached Before the First Parliament on a Monthly Fast day / by . . . Mr. Stephen Marshall . . . / published by G. Firmin . . . with notes upon the sermon, 1657.

    *Marshall, Stephen (1594?-1655), Reformation and Desolation, or, A Sermon Tending to the Discovery of the Symptomes of a People to Whom God Will by no Meanes be Reconciled. Preached to the Honourable House of Commons at their late solemne fast, Decemb. 22. 1641. By Stephen Marshall B.D. Minister of Finchingfield in Essex, 1642. Zephaniah 2:1,2. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.

    Marshall, Stephen (1594?-1655), A Sermon Preached to the Right Honourable the Lord Mayor, and Court of Aldermen of the City of London, at Their Anniversary Meeting on Easter Monday April 1652, at the Spittle. Wherein the Unity of the Saints With Christ, the Head, and Especially With the Church, the Body; With the Duties Thence Arising, are Endeavoured to be Cleared. Tending to Heale our Rents and Divisions. The second impression, corrected by the authour. By Stephen Marshal B.D. and minister of the gospel at Finchingfield in Essex, 1652.

    Marshall, Stephen (1594?-1655), A Sermon Preached to the two Houses of Parliament, at Their Solemn Meeting to Praise God for his Infinite Mercy in the Restoring of the Said Houses of Parliament to Their Honor and Freedome With so Little Effusion of Blood: at the Abbey-Church in Westminster, Aug. 12. 1647. By Stephen Marshall, 1647

    Marshall, Stephen (1594?-1655), The Sinne of Hardnesse of Heart: The Nature, Danger, and Remedy of it. Opened in a Sermon, Preached to the Honorable House of Commons, July 28. 1648. being the day of their solemne monethly fast. By Stephen Marshall, B.D. minister of Gods Word at Finchingfield in Essex. Published by order of that House, 1648. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.

    Nairn, Thomas, A Sermon, Preached at Braehead, at the Ordination of Mr. Alexander Marshal, November 15th, 1744, on 1 Cor. iii. 9 [1 Corinthians 3:9]. "We are Labourers together with God." and A Short Account of the Constitution, and some of the Proceedings of the Reformed Presbytery.

    Newcomen, Matthew (1610?-1669, The Craft and Cruelty of the Churches Adversaries, Discovered in a Sermon Preached at St. Margarets in Westminster, Before the Honourable House of Commons Assembled in Parliament. Novemb. 5, 1642. By Mathew Newcomen, minister of the Gospell at Dedham in Essex. Published by order of the House of Commons. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.

    Owen, John (1616-1683), The Advantage of the Kingdome of Christ, in the Shaking of the Kingdoms of the World: or, Providential Alterations, in Their Subserviencie to Christ's Exaltation. Opened in a sermon preached to the Parliament, Octob. 24. 1651. A solemn day of thanksgiving for the destruction of the Scots army at Worcester, with sundry other mercies; by John Owen, minister of the Gospel, 1652. Alternate title: THE ADVANTAGE OF THE KINGDOM OF CHRIST, IN THE SHAKING OF THE KINGDOMS OF THE WORLD. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.

    *Owen, John (1616-1683), The Complete Works of John Owen, 16 volumes, ISBN: 0851513921 9780851513928. A Christian classic. Alternate title: THE WORKS OF JOHN OWEN. See Volume 1 for annotation on all 16 volumes. Many separate works by Owen may be found in the Puritan Hard Drive and the Reformation Bookshelf 30 CD Set.
    John Owen "is by common consent not the most versatile, but the greatest among Puritan theologians. For solidity, profundity, massiveness and majesty in exhibiting from Scripture God's ways with sinful mankind there is no one to touch him. . . ." -- J.I. Packer in A Quest for Godliness, p. 81
    "To master his works is to be a profound theologian." -- C.H. Spurgeon
    "The Banner of Truth Trust completed in May, 1968, the re-issue of the complete English works of Owen, his seven volumes on the Epistle of Hebrews excepted. All of these volumes 'are of the greatest value' (Dr. Lloyd-Jones), but for newcomers to Owen we especially recommend the four volumes in the Practical Division (vols. 6-9) . . ." -- William J. Grier
    "His works on communion, Christian life, and the person and glory of Christ, the work of the Holy Spirit, etc. are of the utmost value to any serious-minded Christian." -- Jay P. Green, Sr.

    *Owen, John (1616-1683), God's Presence With a People the Spring of Their Prosperity; With Their Special Interest in Abiding in Him. Alternate title: "GOD'S PRESENCE WITH A PEOPLE, THE SPRING OF THEIR PROSPERITY; WITH THEIR SPECIALL INTEREST IN ABIDING WITH HIM. A SERMON, PREACHED TO THE PARLIAMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF ENGLAND, SCOTLAND, AND IRELAND, AT WESTMINSTER, OCTOB. 30. 1656. A DAY OF SOLEMN HUMILIATION. BY JOHN OWEN, D.D. A SERVANT OF JESUS CHRIST, IN THE WORK OF THE GOSPEL. PRINTED BY ORDER OF PARLIAMENT, 1656. A Christian classic. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #25. Available in various editions of THE COMPLETE WORKS OF JOHN OWEN. Available in THE COMPLETE WORKS OF JOHN OWEN, VOL. 8, SERMONS TO THE NATION, sermon 11.
    http://johnowenquotes.files.wordpress.com/2011/01/johnowenvol-8.pdf
    Owen preaches at length, 21 pages, on God's presence with a people, both individually and corporately, in a sermon on the text And he went out to meet Asa, and said unto him, Hear ye me, Asa, and all Judah and Benjamin; The Lord is with you, while ye be with him; and if ye seek him, he will be found of you; but if ye forsake him, he will forsake you. (2 Chronicles 15:2), delivered to Parliament October 30, 1656.
    "The great concernment of any people or nation is, to know that all their prosperity is from the presence of God amongst them, and to attend to that which will give continuance thereunto. . . .
    "There is a presence of God in respect of providential dispensations. . . . -- attended with peculiar love, favor, good-will, special care towards them with whom he is so present. So Abimelech observed that he was with Abraham, Genesis 21:22, God is with thee in all that thou doest, -- with thee to guide thee, bless thee, preserve thee, as we shall see afterward. So he promised to be with Joshua, I will be with thee, Joshua 1:5; and so he was with Gideon, The Lord is with thee, Judges 6:12, -- to bless him in his great undertaking; and so with Jeremiah, I am with thee, Jeremiah 15:20. This is fully expressed, Isaiah 43:1,2, I have redeemed thee, I have called thee by thy name; thou art mine. When thou passest through the waters, I will be with thee; and through the rivers, they shall not overflow thee. And this is the presence of God here intimated, -- his presence with the people as to special providential dispensations, as is manifest from the whole discourse of the prophet; and wherein this consists, shall be afterward at large declared. . . .
    "There is an abiding with God in national administrations; -- this is a fruit of the other, in those who are called to them. And that this is principally here intended is evident from that use that Asa made of this information and exhortation of the prophet. He did not only look to his personal walking thereupon, but also immediately set upon the work of ordering the whole affairs of the kingdom so as God might be glorified thereby. How this may be effected, shall at large afterward be declared. What hath already been spoken may suffice for a foundation of that proposition which I shall this day insist upon; and it is this, --
    "The presence of God with a people, in special providential dispensations for their good, depends on their obediential presence with him in national administrations to his glory: The Lord is with you, while ye be with him. . . .
    "What is the rule and measure of God's continuance with his people in the covenant of grace? Plainly this, -- that he will never forsake them; and, on that account, will take care that they shall never forsake him, but abide with him forever. It is not whilst they do so and so, he will abide with them; and when they cease so to do, he will forsake them, as to his federal and covenant presence; -- there is not such a sandy foundation left us of our abiding with God in Christ. See the tenor of the covenant, Jeremiah 31:33, 32:38-40. The sum is, that God will be with them, and take care that they always abide with him; and therefore hath he provided for all interveniences imaginable, that nothing shall violate this union. God lays his unchangeableness as the foundation of the covenant, Malachi 3:6, and he therein makes us unchangeable; -- not absolutely so, for we change every moment; but with respect to the terms and bounds of the covenant, he hath undertaken that we shall never leave him. The law of God's presence in respect of providential dispensations, and all special privileges attending it, is quite of another importance: it is purely conditional, as you may see in my text. The tenor of it is expressed to the height, 1 Samuel 2:30, I said indeed that thy house, and the house of thy father, should walk before me forever: but now the Lord saith, Be it far from me; for them that honor me I will honor, and they that despise me shall be lightly esteemed. Here is no alteration of counsel or purpose in God; but merely an explanation of the rule, law, and tenor of providential dispensations; -- no interpretation of the covenant of grace (Eli held not the priesthood by that covenant); but an explication of the tenor of a privilege given in special providence, Psalm 89:32,33. Hence is that variety of God's dealings with men mentioned in the Scripture; which yet are always righteous, according to one or other of these rules and laws. . . .
    "I suppose I need not go for proof beyond the observation of the constant tenor of God's proceedings with his people of old. When did he not deal thus with them? What instance can be given of transgressing this rule? Is the whole story of the nation of the Jews any thing but the illustration of this proposition? Some ruled well, and sought the Lord; and the Lord was with them, and prospered them in all their ways; -- some fell from him, and walked according to their own imaginations; and the Lord cut them short on that account; -- yea, sometimes the same man, as Solomon, Asa, Uzziah, experienced both these states and conditions. Hath not the state of all nations, since they came into the power of men professing the knowledge of him, been the same? Look on the Roman empire; did it not flourish under the hand of men who ruled with God, and were faithful with the saints? Is not the present distraction of it, under the fury and cruelty of Turk and Pope, the issue of the violence, unrighteousness, idolatry, luxury, and persecution of ill governors? Doth not the demonstration of all God's people in the world -- the consideration whereof, in particular, might be insisted on as the ground and reason of the truth insisted on -- require that it should be thus Leviticus 26:1, and almost the whole book of Deuteronomy, are sermons on this text; and every verse, almost, in them would afford a new confirmation of the truth in hand. . . .
    "The second use of this pillar was, to give them protection and defense in their ways; so Exodus 14:19,20,24. This protected them from the Egyptians; -- and from thence God troubled their enemies out of the pillar; that is, from his especial presence. This use of it is insisted on, Isaiah 4:5,6. The cloud, that was as smoke by day, and as fire by night, was also a shadow, a place of refuge, and a covert; in one word, a protection or a defense. And this is a second thing which is in God's special presence, -- he will protect or defend them with whom he is so present. He is their dwellingplace, Psalm 90:1, then, when in this world they have none; their refuge in the time of trouble: so Isaiah 25:4, 26:1, 31:4. Promises and instances to make this good abound; -- they are known to all; the time would fail me to insist upon them. I might go over all the causes, means, and ways of the fears, dangers, ruin of such a people, and show you how a defense is provided against them all. Are their fears from themselves, because of their folly, weakness, and division? or from pretended friends, because of their envy and desertion? or from open enemies, because of their power, cruelty, malice, and revenge? A defense is provided on every account. Heat, rain, tempests, storms, adversity, prosperity, -- all are provided against, where God is present, Isaiah 32:1,2.
    "And if any people in the world have experience of this truth, we have it this day. Had not the Lord been with us, who had not destroyed us? Enemies, friends, abroad, at home, our own follies, -- all, any of them, had done the work, had not the Lord himself been with us. . . .
    "That we may abide with God, this is indispensably required, -- that we may have peace with him in Jesus Christ. If we are never with him, we cannot abide with him; no man can abide where he never cornea The acceptance of our persons lies at the bottom of the acceptance of our duties. As the special presence of God with any, is in and by Christ, and no otherwise, so is our abiding with God in and through him. God with us is the name of Christ: our being with God is in him who is our peace. Two cannot walk together, unless they be agreed, Amos 3:3.
    "Now, because this is not to be expected from all the individuals of a nation, yet this thing is to be endeavored, -- that the rulers of it be such as have this interest. I do not divest of a share in government, those who have no share in Christ, if lawfully called thereunto; but I say, when God gives governors whom he intends to make a blessing unto a people, they shall be such as are blessed of him in Christ. And if ever the government of this nation, in this present constitution, -- suppose it the most exactly framed and balanced, in the several parts of it, for the furtherance of public good, -- be devolved into the hands of men not interested in God by Christ, though the constitution may be absolutely good, yet the government will not be blessed, and the nation will be ruined; for God and his glory will depart, Micah 5:5,6. It is Christ that is our peace, even in outward troubles. . . .
    "This, then, I say, is pre-required, as a qualification of any person to the performance of this duty of abiding with God. It is the psalmist's advice, Psalm 2:11,12. Let this principle be always owned amongst you; by it honor Christ in the world. Give him the pre-eminence; it is the Father's will he should have it in all things. Expect not the presence of God, but upon this account. Bear testimony herein against the world of profane men, who despise these things. Seeing, then, it cannot be expected to have this qualification diffused universally, as yet, through the body of the people, let the rulers take care that they be not the cause of God's departure from us. . . ." -- John Owen
    Owen, John (1616-1683), God's Presence With a People the Spring of Their Prosperity
    http://www.reformedsermonarchives.com/owen11.htm

    Owen, John (1616-1683), An Humble Testimony Unto the Goodness and Severity of God in his Dealing With Sinful Churches and Nations. Or the only way to deliver a sinful nation from utter ruin by impendent judgments: in a discourse on the words of our Lord Jesus Christ, . . . By John Owen, D.D. The second edition Edinburgh, 1737. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive. Available on Reformation Bookshelf CD #25.

    Owen, John (1616-1683), Ouranon Ourania. The Shaking and Translating of Heaven and Earth. A Sermon Preached Before the Honourable House of Commons, in Parliament Assembled, April the 19th, 1649. By Dr. John Owen. London, [1793]. Available (MP3 format), on the Puritan Hard Drive.

    Owen, John (1616-1683), A Sermon Preach'd to the Honourable House of Commons, in Parliament Assembled, on January 31st, 1648/49. A day of Solemn Humiliation. By John Owen . . . , 1720. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.

    *Owen, John (1616-1683), Sermons to the Nation, ISBN: 9780851510668 0851510663. A Christian classic.
    "Contains 16 long and detailed sermons that Owen gave mostly during the Cromwellian Period. Nine of them were preached before the House of Commons (Long Parliament). The majority of texts that are used are from the Old Testament."

    Owen, John (1616-1683), The Shaking and Translating of Heaven and Earth. A Sermon Preached Before the Honourable House of Commons, in Parliament Assembled, April the 19th, 1649. By Dr. John Owen.

    Owen, John (1616-1683), The Stedfastness of Promises, and the Sinfulness of Staggering: Opened in a Sermon Preached at Margarets in Westminster Before the Parliament Febr. 28. 1649. Being a day set apart for solemn humiliation throughout the nation. By John Owen minister of the Gospel, 1650. Available on the Puritan Hard Drive.

    Owen, John (1616-1683), A Vision of Vnchangeable Free Mercy, in Sending the Means of Grace to Undeserved Sinners: Wherein God's uncontrollable eternall purpose, in sending, and continuing the gospel unto this nation, in the middest of oppositions and contingencies, is discovered: his distinguishing mercy, in this great work, exalted, asserted, against opposers, repiners: in a sermon preached before the Honourable House of Commons, April 29. being the day of publike humiliation. Whereunto is annexed, a short defensative about church-government (with a countrey essay for the pract